Dycal (dental compound), sulfonamide (antibiotic).

vision blue

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Has anyone else ever had Dycal put into their fillings or other dental work? Thing is, you may not know because dentists don't tell you. I don't even know if Dycal still being used;; was popular in the 1980s I think. Dycal has a sulfonamide in it. Sulfonamide keeps important things from getting to the mitochondria and therefore keep mitochondria from "generating energy".

On sulfonamide antibiotic, I guess it would do the same thing- interestingly, there was some study that found the rate of sulfonamide allergy was greater in lupus patients than healthy control- I don't think anyone looked at CFS.
 

Wishful

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Dycal has a sulfonamide in it. Sulfonamide keeps important things from getting to the mitochondria and therefore keep mitochondria from "generating energy".
If the sulfonamide is in the filling material, it's either gone quickly, or it leaks out at a rate that is very low. I can't see it as affecting mitochondria at a rate that will be noticeable. Maybe it would be a problem if taken in pill form daily, but not at a rate of molecules per week, or whatever the leakage rate would be from fillings.

If it triggered an immune reaction, that would be easily testable.
 

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Interesting comment- thanks. I believe it leaks out by small amounts over the lifetime of the restoration. I'll see if can find some links on it, but there isnt' much. it's used - or was - in pretty much all types of restorations, i.e. it can be.

Maybe also depends on 1 tooth vs 15 teeth with an "offensive" chemical.

How do you think it is easily testable if it triggered an immune reaction? Not sure what you have in mind.

btw, are dental materials a particular area of expertise of yours? I could sure use one...
 
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Wishful

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How do you think it is easily testable if it triggered an immune reaction? Not sure what you have in mind.
Allergic reactions seem to be pretty dramatic and reliable. Apply possible allergen, look for a response. Type I allergic reactions release histamines. Type IV releases various cytokines. Testing for type IV reactions isn't a standard test for most medical clinics, but it can be done. So, compared to a lot of other possible health-affecting chemicals (or EMF or whatever), testing sulfonamide for an allergic reaction is easily testable.

btw, are dental materials a particular area of expertise of yours?
Nope, just an interest in materials and science in general. Also an interest in basic logic of situations. People might read that there's a toxic material (sulfonamide or mercury) in fillings, yet not pay attention to the point that it's locked into the filling. It doesn't matter how much is in the filling if almost all of it stays in there. If the toxic level of sulfonamide is 10 mcg/day and your filling leaks it a 1/10000 that rate, it's probably a lower health risk than a lot of other things you consume each day, such as processed foods or tap water. It's all relative.
 

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ok, thanks for your thoughts

its actually no easier to test than any chemcial reaction- there can be delays to reaction making cause - effect difficult. Plus low levels of continuous stimulation make it difficult as well. But do agree that there are many things in princiople possible- but that doesn't get one very far unless you have a sophisticated lab in your back pocket.

(by the way in my case i do have proof of immune reaction to dental materials, but for many this may not be the case)

On the other comment, If you read on dental materials, you will find these things are not locked into fillings for long. They leach out a bit at a time for years. No more than silicone being "locked into" breast implants.
 

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If you read on dental materials, you will find these things are not locked into fillings for long. They leach out a bit at a time for years.
Yes, but the rate of release makes a difference. If it's leaching out at a rate where it's below the level for noticeable biological harm, especially if it's eliminated from the body faster than the leaching rate, it shouldn't be a problem. If it leaches out fast enough to cause harm, then it is a problem.