Does Butyrate make you sick at first?

ebethc

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I just started taking butyrate a few days ago and I feel like I'm coming down with something... Achey, tired, any exertion makes me sweat...It's not a really melodramatic reaction, and I can tolerate it, but I do want to understand if it's typical and if it's going to go away soon. Is this an ammonia detox reaction? I just take a few each day.

thanks
 
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I haven't taken butyrate in about a year, but it was absolutely awful for me. I was so freaking sick when taking it and it never seemed to want to end with me so I just stopped taking it.

How long have you been on it?
 

ebethc

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I haven't taken butyrate in about a year, but it was absolutely awful for me. I was so freaking sick when taking it and it never seemed to want to end with me so I just stopped taking it.

How long have you been on it?
@Soundthealarm21 - it has only been a few days, so not long, but long enough that I'm wondering if this is me getting sick or if butyrate doesn't agree w me. I think I'll give a a break today and then try it again..

@ggingues - it supposedly absorbs ammonia in the gut. i don't know if I'm having a detox reaction, or just getting sick for some other reason (I do get sick often anyway)

@Sushi - how long did you take it? do you think that it helped you detox ammonia faster?
 

JalapenoLuv

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My guess is you're overdosing. If you have working intestinal bacteria they make all the butyrate you need so it's an unnecessary supplement. On the other hand, if you're taking antibiotics it is great when combined with vitamin k2.
 
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I know this is really old post!!! But just on second day of butyrate capsule and have felt worse both days. Light headed fatigue worse, sore throat, was hoping someone might have an explanation but of course doesn't look like it as with most CFS reactions!!
 

pattismith

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I wonder if this paper would explain why some people doesn't tolerate very well Butyrate.:thumbdown:

Butyrate may activate abortive lytic EBV infection in cells with latent EBV...


Activation of Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Infection by Radiation and Sodium Butyrate in Vitro and in Vivo: A Potential Method for Treating EBV-positive Malignancies

http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/60/20/5781.short
October 2000
Abstract
The consistent presence of the EBV genome in certain tumors offers the potential for novel EBV-directed therapies. Switching the latent form of EBV infection present in most EBV-positive tumor cells into the cytolytic form may be clinically useful because lytic EBV infection leads to host cell destruction, and very few normal cells contain the EBV genome. It would also be therapeutically advantageous to induce expression of EBVencoded lytic proteins that convert the nucleoside analogues ganciclovir (GCV) and 3′-azido-3′deoxythymidine (AZT) into their active, cytotoxic forms. In this report, we have explored two different approaches for activating the lytic form of EBV infection in tumors. We show that γ-irradiation at clinically relevant doses induces lytic EBV infection in lymphoblastoid cell lines in vitro as well as in EBV-positive B-cell tumors in SCID mice.
In addition, sodium butyrate (given as a single i.p. dose) is effective for activating lytic viral infection in some EBV tumor types in SCID mice. We also examined whether low-doseγ -irradiation treatment of EBV-positive lymphoblastoid cells in vitro promotes GCV or AZT susceptibility. The combination of radiation with either GCV or AZT induced significantly more cell killing in vitro than either radiation or prodrug treatment alone. Most importantly, we found that the combination of γ-irradiation and GCV was much more effective in treating EBV-positive lymphoblastoid tumors in SCID mice than either agent alone. Thus, GCV or AZT treatment could potentially enhance the therapeutic efficacy of radiation therapy for EBV-positive lymphomas in patients.
 

dannybex

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I wonder if this paper would explain why some people doesn't tolerate very well Butyrate.:thumbdown:

Butyrate may activate abortive lytic EBV infection in cells with latent EBV...

Activation of Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Infection by Radiation and Sodium Butyrate in Vitro and in Vivo: A Potential Method for Treating EBV-positive Malignancies
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/60/20/5781.short
October 2000
Abstract
The consistent presence of the EBV genome in certain tumors offers the potential for novel EBV-directed therapies. Switching the latent form of EBV infection present in most EBV-positive tumor cells into the cytolytic form may be clinically useful because lytic EBV infection leads to host cell destruction, and very few normal cells contain the EBV genome. It would also be therapeutically advantageous to induce expression of EBVencoded lytic proteins that convert the nucleoside analogues ganciclovir (GCV) and 3′-azido-3′deoxythymidine (AZT) into their active, cytotoxic forms. In this report, we have explored two different approaches for activating the lytic form of EBV infection in tumors. We show that γ-irradiation at clinically relevant doses induces lytic EBV infection in lymphoblastoid cell lines in vitro as well as in EBV-positive B-cell tumors in SCID mice.
In addition, sodium butyrate (given as a single i.p. dose) is effective for activating lytic viral infection in some EBV tumor types in SCID mice. We also examined whether low-doseγ -irradiation treatment of EBV-positive lymphoblastoid cells in vitro promotes GCV or AZT susceptibility. The combination of radiation with either GCV or AZT induced significantly more cell killing in vitro than either radiation or prodrug treatment alone. Most importantly, we found that the combination of γ-irradiation and GCV was much more effective in treating EBV-positive lymphoblastoid tumors in SCID mice than either agent alone. Thus, GCV or AZT treatment could potentially enhance the therapeutic efficacy of radiation therapy for EBV-positive lymphomas in patients.
Nope. Note that this was a study where mice were injected with sodium butyrate. Probably a large amount.
 
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About six months ago I tried Butyrate and felt pretty crappy from it. Couldn't figure out why but didn't worry about it - just moved it to the back of my supplements cabinet. But then I recently had my DNA run through GeneticsLifeHack.com and found a clue why the Butyrate didn't work for me. Turns out I have one copy of the SCADD mutation. From my analysis provided by GeneticsLifeHack:

"SCADD is a condition where the body can’t use the shorter chain fatty acids for energy in
the mitochondria. People with SCADD then have a hard time when the body goes into
ketosis due to either fasting or lack of eating carbs. This is a real problem for kids,
especially when they get sick and don’t want to eat. The lack of the body being able to easily
kick into ketosis and use the shorter chain fatty acids can cause hypoglycemia and
metabolic acidosis.

What does this mean for an adult with one copy? Some carriers of one SCADD mutation
find that they also tend to get hypoglycemia when fasting for longer periods of time (e.g.
longer than a day). They also may not do very well on a keto diet. If this applies to you,
then you may want to try a diet lower in fat with at least some carbs during the day.
Anecdotally, the hypoglycemia is worse when exercising a bunch without eating and when
drinking a lot of alcohol without eating."

Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid. Sounds like it kinda just sat there without being processed in a timely manner. Don't know if this is helpful to anyone but thought I should share.