Do you have thumb hyperextension?

For SEIDs patients, do you also have painless thumb hyperextension?

  • I have SEIDs, POTs, cervical instability and thumb hyperextension.

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • I have SEIDs, POTs, cervical instability but no thumb hyperextension.

    Votes: 3 23.1%
  • I have SEIDs and POTs but no cervical instability and thumb hyperextension

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • I have SEIDs and POTs but no cervical instability and no thumb hyperextension

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • I have SEIDs only and thumb hyperextension

    Votes: 1 7.7%
  • I have SEIDs only and no thumb hyperextension

    Votes: 3 23.1%

  • Total voters
    13
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I have this and can rotate my elbows and knees the wrong direction too, and excessive motion/ instability at shoulders and hips, my ribs are all out of place, and many PTs have said my vertebrae slide out of place (has been said about my lower cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae). I also have paralysis of my small intestine and significant dysmotility that causes chronic nausea and pain any time I eat or drink.

I have ME/ CFS and HHV-7 encephalitis since I was 21 (I’m 29 now), and POTS since I was 12, and hypermobility since birth.

I later developed MCAS, with constant hives, vomiting, and fainting lasting for many months. Now mostly controlled by maxing out all my MCAS meds (thank you, Dr K!!)

So far I have not heard back from Dr B on the cervical instability and it’s been several months :/ I kinda felt like I would have heard back by now if it was CCI/AAI. Even though one of my worst symptoms is crippling pain from the base of the skull.

I did the supine MRI on a T3 but they didn’t stabilize my head for the shot and the images were blurry because I was crying from the pain.
 

Hip

Senior Member
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Good idea to do a poll on this.

Though I believe in the test for joint hypermobility asks whether you can bend your thumb back to touch your forearm, as shown in diagram B in this Beighton score calculator webpage (and also shown in the image I posted below).

That webpage allows you to work out you Beighton score, which is a scoring system from 0 to 9, depending on the flexibility of various joints. A Beighton score of around 4-6 or higher indicates joint hypermobility, caused by lax ligaments.

Being able to bend your thumb to touch your forearm
is one of the tests that make up your Beighton score

570-1-hlight_default.jpg



You might want to make it clear that this poll is only for ME/CFS patients who have been tested for CCI (which I presume is the intention), as the last two answer options of the poll might be selected by ME/CFS patients who were not tested for CCI, and so do not know their CCI status.
 

Judee

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I do not but my mom does. I on the other hand can bend my fingers and elbows backwards. I didn't realize I did that until I was taking a taekwondo class years ago and my teacher freaked out because he saw my arms in such an unnatural position.
 
Last edited:

panckage

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I on the other hand can bend my fingers and elbows backwards. I didn't realize I did that until I was taking a taekwondo class years ago and my teacher freaked out because he saw my arms in such an unnatural position.
I find that funny. I took a martial arts class and ALL the females (4 or 5 of them) were able to hyperextend their elbows. None of the males could do it though. I thought it odd but maybe it is common? They were all Chinese if that matters