Dental Issues

LaurelB

Senior Member
Messages
127
Likes
23
I have had severe dental problems since coming down with ME/CFS, including rapid tooth decay despite obsessive brushing, flossing and other measures of dental care.

I have heard others with ME/CFS speak of this as well.

Does anyone know of any actual published studies that have been done on dental problems in ME/CFS? I'm looking for a possible explanation that I can print out.

Thank you.
 

Esther12

Senior Member
Messages
13,774
Likes
28,351
Some people get really stained teeth despite no red wine/tea/coffee... apparently it's because of some bug that a small minority of people have living in their mouth.

When you say 'obsessive brushing' - it is possible to take it to far and do damage. What does your dentist say? It could be totally unrelated. (My teeth are great... low sugar diet!)
 
Last edited:

LaurelB

Senior Member
Messages
127
Likes
23
By obsessive, I just mean I typically brush after every meal (3x a day) and floss after every meal. I also use mouthwash, chew cavity fighting gum (xylitol), and avoid sugar. I've been on a low sugar diet for about 10 years.

Prior to coming down with CFS, I went years without a single cavity.

My dentist has previously approved of my dental hygiene. However, being bedridden, I a have been unable to make it to the dentist for routine appointments.

I read somewhere something about calcium ions possibly being blocked; something to do with ion channelopathy. I haven't been able to be online enough to do research. I'm curious to know how this could play a role.

I also have severe dry mouth, which I attempt to fix with Biotene dry mouth products, etc.
 

Esther12

Senior Member
Messages
13,774
Likes
28,351
Sorry, I've not heard anything directly related to CFS. If we have immune problems, we could be more prone to mouth bacteria? Total speculation though.
 
Last edited:

Mij

Senior Member
Messages
2,353
Likes
4,958
I have had severe dental problems since coming down with ME/CFS, including rapid tooth decay despite obsessive brushing, flossing and other measures of dental care.

I have heard others with ME/CFS speak of this as well.

Does anyone know of any actual published studies that have been done on dental problems in ME/CFS? I'm looking for a possible explanation that I can print out.

Thank you.
It's possible that you are too acidic, it causes tooth/enamel erosion.

Mij
 
Messages
4
Likes
0
Location
Texas
Hi Laural,

I didn't have many dental problems until I got CFS either, and like you, I have a very dry mouth at times. I don't know of any published data that correlates dental problems with CFS, but I have read that a dry mouth allows bacteria to proliferate. I think I have also read that some CFS sufferers have overly acidic mouths. So given those two variables, I can see why we would struggle more with tooth decay. Sorry you're having a tough time with it.
 

sleepy237

Senior Member
Messages
246
Likes
14
Location
Hell
Hey Laural, just like you started after onset now my mouths a mess, the dry mouth! I wake up with an intensely dry mouth and see the whiteness on my gums due to too much air I think. This can lead to decay and there are products available in pharmacies to keep it moist. Mine also got worse after an acute sinus infection, where all my teeth started to hurt. I have some infection in a root and need treatment for that as well as the other decays and problems. Dental issues are very common in CFS/ME/FIBRO
 

rlc

Senior Member
Messages
822
Likes
300
Hi LaurelB, have you had your Vitamin D and Calcium levels checked? you need vitamin D to absorb Calcium which you need to have strong teeth, a bit of info about it here http://blog.drgina.com/2009/03/24/vitamin-d-deficiency-and-tooth-decay/ I've seen in your previous posts that you've had trouble with EBV CMV etc new reseach has found that the immune system can't work without sufficient Vit D info here http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100307215534.htm the referance ranges for Vit d have been proven to be way to low info on it here http://www.thorne.com/altmedrev/.fulltext/13/1/6.pdf and here http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health/deficiency/am-i-vitamin-d-deficient.shtml

If Vitamin D is fine by new referance ranges make sure you've been checked for celiac and other mal absorbtion syndromes, if calcium is low make sure they rule out all causes of hypocalicimia, my feeling is that if CFS caused tooth decay, everyone here would have bad teeth which they don't, so it's important to look for the underlying cause of your dental problems, which is probably causing alot of your other problems as well, Hope this helps

All the Best
 

jstefl

Senior Member
Messages
216
Likes
218
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
I have also had severe problems with my teeth. I needed to get my teeth cleaned every three months.

Two things helped. The first was a drug called Periostat. I believe that it is a very low dose tetracycline that I was prescribed by my dentist.

The second was Valcyte. After taking the Valcyte for eight months, my problems were greatly reduced. I now can go six months between cleanings.

While I was at the Reno conference, I asked a very prominent CFS specialist about this, and he told me that it is because your body gets more acidic. When this happens, it changes the environment that the bacteria in your mouth exist in. This allows some of trhe more destructive bacteria to thrive.

John
 

Advocate

Senior Member
Messages
528
Likes
88
Location
U.S.A.
I also have severe dry mouth, which I attempt to fix with Biotene dry mouth products, etc.
A cheap, easy fix for the dry mouth might be to keep a container of xylitol granules or powder next to your bed and tuck a little bit into your mouth when it is dry. It will stimulate saliva, kill bad bacteria (they love it, eat it and die), taste good, and when you swallow the xylitol-laden saliva it will strengthen your bones. There has been a lot of research on this.
 

*GG*

senior member
Messages
6,335
Likes
5,012
Location
Concord, NH
In addition to what rlc said, I have read that medications can do this, and lots of us have poor digestion, so if you don't digest your food properly, then you are likely not getting proper nutrition, which is needed for healthy teeth! Sucks to be us!!

GG
 

Wayne

Senior Member
Messages
3,509
Likes
4,763
Location
Ashland, Oregon
Dental Issues and Lyme Disease

Does anyone know of any actual published studies that have been done on dental problems in ME/CFS? I'm looking for a possible explanation that I can print out. Thank you.
Hi Laurel,

I too have had my share of dental problems, and have noticed I easily get cavities. I seem to remember you mentioning once that you had Lyme. If so (and perhaps even if not), you may find the following article interesting.

It seems if the mouth can become ground zero for Lyme, it could be the same for other types of bacteria as well. This is why I do an almost daily routine of "oil pulling" and holding bentonite clay in my mouth to absorb various kinds of heavy metals and bacterial infections that may be going on. So far, it seems to be helping me manage my dental problems a fair amount better.

I hope some of this may help.

Best, Wayne
..................................................

Ground Zero for Lyme is the Mouth

I'll paste the first three paragraphs of this article below:

Ground Zero for Lyme is the Mouth

The mouth is the most important factor in the breakdown of health; there is no close second. All the antibiotics, and all the holistic approaches to healing, are likely to fail if the mouth has been overlooked.

The mouth is a reservoir of bacterial infections that become entrenched within the structure of teeth and trigger the high number of chronic degenerative diseases now epidemic in America, including Lyme.

Lyme has the ability to embed itself in tooth structure, where it goes undetected and remains unreachable by antibiotics. Each tooth has some three miles of tubules that emanate from the main canal. Bacteria hide out in all that footage. Lyme is a spirochete similar to spirochetes that cause syphilis. Spirochetes by nature burrow into tissue, such as teeth, bones, and soft tissue like the brain. These areas are the toughest to get to, impenetrable by drugs and herbs.​
 
Last edited:
Messages
1,270
Likes
116
Wayne, I had entirely forgotten about the oil pulling, which I want to start again. I vaguely remember getting a pure sesame oil, is that right?

I have had major tooth problems, partly because of lyme I think, but also because they messed with my teeth, doing surgery under anesthesia when I was 11 in order to remove fragments of baby teeth so they could give me braces, and then I got so many cavities while having braces, that I ended up with about 16 amalgams in my mouth as a teen. And all along, I never even needed braces. My teeth were straight, good, and not crowded.

Don't get me started on the dental profession...I can't even get someone to do a hand cleaning anymore. The cavitron cracked a tooth root once and also cracked a tooth root of a friend of mine. Both of us *lost* those perfectly good teeth. If you read the peer review literature that CAN happen with the diamond burr of the cavitron. Hygienists aren't always that careful. I like a good hand cleaning. I've been a year and a half without a cleaning now while travelling. The last dentists office I wasted $90 at, a few months ago, I was assured beforehand they would do it, and when she saw the work involved, she said she wouldn't. I had a hygienist practically threaten me once that my teeth would fall out if I didn't let him use the cavitron.
 

LaurelB

Senior Member
Messages
127
Likes
23
Thanks for all the helpful replies! I will look into all the suggestions. I have had my calcium and vitamin D levels checked; they were within normal range. It's been awhile though, so perhaps it's worth checking again.

I do use lots of xylitol products, including oral mints with xylitol and probiotics specific to oral care. Nothing seems to help.

I was also diagnosed with Lyme years back (through Igenex), so I will take a look at that Lyme article.

Thanks again for all the links and suggestions!!!
 

*GG*

senior member
Messages
6,335
Likes
5,012
Location
Concord, NH
Thanks for all the helpful replies! I will look into all the suggestions. I have had my calcium and vitamin D levels checked; they were within normal range. It's been awhile though, so perhaps it's worth checking again.
QUOTE]

Some people think that the current Vitamin D levels that are considered "normal" are to low. FYI

GG
 

Enid

Senior Member
Messages
3,309
Likes
865
Location
UK
Just to add (after 11 years) major tooth decay did set in (mouth ulcers too) despite my Dentists best and my own work. It followed severe ME symptoms along with the all the others. It has stabilised now along with the return of saliva production. I think it followed the extraction of two teeth showing some possible root infection and general health supplements. I've always felt the cause secondary bacterial infection from ME. It affected the eyes and nose (dry) hearing and sinuses blocked and painful and olfactory distortions. Not much help except that it worked itself out. There is another thread "Help - advice wanted Teeth & Gums" too.
 

Little Bluestem

All Good Things Must Come to an End
Messages
4,927
Likes
6,209
Has the tooth been extracted yet? If so, did your doctor give you instructions? What sort of things are you wondering about?
 

Toxed

Certified in Environmental Medicine, ATSDR
Messages
120
Likes
229
Location
Oregon
My enamel dissolved after glyphosate (Roundup) exposure. Like within 2 weeks, on 6 teeth. Glyphosate is a chelator. Avoid areas were glyphosate has been sprayed for a month. Don't eat GMO foods, or conventional grown grains, peas, beans or cane sugar. Eat organic for those foods.

I read a book called, "Cure Teeth Naturally" by Ramiel Nigel. It helps you eat to rebuild your teeth (and bones), and gives you resources for finding less toxic dentists.

With all our stomach issues I'd advice against xylitol. Its toxic and known to cause stomach problems. Coconut oil is a much healthier option. Oil pulling with coconut oil is very effective. Mouthwash with organic essential oils of mint, oregano and cinnamon, in water. The best mouthwash I've found yet is to add 2 Tbl of aloe vera juice to a pint of essential oil mouth wash, "Inhibitory activity of Aloe vera gel on some clinically isolated cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria" Mohammadmehdi Fani1) and Jamshid Kohanteb2),
Journal of Oral Science, Vol. 54, No. 1, 15-21, 2012