Dental Fillings - is anything safe?

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I have a mouth full of composite (plastic) fillings which even "biological" dentists use. Now I need two more cavities filled, despite trying my best to resolve the issues I have with tooth decay the past few years.

Turns out the composite fillings are toxic, made of BPA and heavy metals that can and do leak into your system.

This was discussed on another thread but rather than hijacking that thread, I'm quoting someone here:

These materials have to be very well researched and tested before placing them in our bodies!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ar... that are,its intrinsic toxicity remains high.

In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic.

From my research and some recommendation, it seems that ELS from SAREMCO Switzerland are ok, but, please, do your own research! This is not medical advice!

Holistore by Denmat seems to also be a good option, as being "the most compatible composite". It contains no aluminum oxide, iron oxide, or barium oxide, no fluoride.

Then, for larger cavities, Holistore fillings will not work, an inlay from Premise Indirect can be the solution, but of course, these materials also have to be tested for each patient.
I'm considering gold fillings but I worry about increasing EMF exposure with metal in my mouth.

Wondering if anyone has more info about safe filling materials. Thanks.
 

Wishful

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I'm considering gold fillings but I worry about increasing EMF exposure with metal in my mouth.
Why should metal fillings be a problem regarding EMF? I have heard of rare cases where people have been able to 'hear' AM radio broadcasts through fillings, but I'm guessing that commercial AM radio towers are less common now, so such cases will be even more rare.
 
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Why should metal fillings be a problem regarding EMF? I have heard of rare cases where people have been able to 'hear' AM radio broadcasts through fillings, but I'm guessing that commercial AM radio towers are less common now, so such cases will be even more rare.
I suppose because metal is conductive for electricity / EMFs. It's why people who are electrically sensitive try to sleep on beds without any metal.
 
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The issue is that composite fillings are toxic and the links above show that they can leak into your system. I think these toxic things build up and we may not notice their effects.

I'm interested in finding a material that will not cause me more problems when I fill the two cavities I currently have. So the question is, what filling material would be healthier? I'll keep researching but if anyone has any info, please post! Thanks.
 
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Wayne

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So the question is, what filling material would be healthier?
Do you know whether "composite" fillings are different from ceramic fillings? I think I remember hearing there is a difference, and that ceramic is the way to go. I know relatively little about the topic but thought I'd mention in case you might want to do a little research on it.
 

Wishful

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I suppose because metal is conductive for electricity / EMFs.
Actually, at high frequencies, metal is shielding, or at least it just conducts along its surface. A metal filling won't 'draw in' extra RF energy. For microwave frequencies, it would just reflect it. A metal bed would provide shielding from below, but shouldn't otherwise affect a person, even in a typical EMF environment.

Gold fillings would be less toxic than amalgam ones, but far more expensive, and not cause any problems involving EMFs. Ceramic should be safe too.
 
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Haven't looked into ceramic extensively but I *believe* I read they can contain BPA, fluoride and aluminum as well.

There are some people who believe metal shouldn't be in the mouth in any form. I haven't had the spoons to fully research why yet.
 
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"Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. "

"The clinical consequences of biodegradation are still poorly understood. "


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3532765/

"Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor with potential toxicity. Composite resins may not contain pure BPA, but its derivatives are widely used. Several studies found doses of BPA or its derivatives in saliva or urine of patients after composite resin placement. "

"
Results:
160 composite resins were identified from 31 manufacturers and 23 manufacturers (74.2%) responded to the survey. From the survey and websites, the composition of 130 composite resins (81.2%) was: 112 (86.2%) based on BPA derivatives, 97 (74.7%) on bis-GMA, 17 (13.1%) without monomer derived from BPA (UDMA, sometimes with TEGDMA) and 6 (4.6%) with UDMA (only); 1 (0.8%) did not contain a BPA derivative or UDMA or TEGDMA. Pure BPA was never reported.
Conclusion:
This work has established a list of 18 composite resins that contain no BPA derivative. Manufacturers should be required to report the exact composition of their products as it often remains unclear or incomplete.
"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5039892/

And this is just BPA, without getting into the carcinogenic and cytotoxic effects of fluoride, aluminum etc.
 

Wishful

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Haven't looked into ceramic extensively but I *believe* I read they can contain BPA, fluoride and aluminum as well.
I can't find an actual description of the ceramic fillings. Is it just metal oxides (that's what ceramic is), or is it safe ceramic particles bound together by polymers? Composite and porcelain fillings are the latter. If a ceramic filling is an inert solid, it will have to be bonded in place with polymers, so there's no escaping that.

If a ceramic filling contains aluminum, it will be aluminum oxide, which is chemically inert. Ruby and sapphire are aluminum oxide plus trace elements for colour. You won't find a metal-free ceramic, because without the metals, it would be pure oxygen.
 

Gingergrrl

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I don't know if this will be helpful @Artemisia but I will be starting the process to have cavities filled with composite/resin fillings (after stalling on this since 2017).

I did a test called the "Clifford Test" (which is a blood test) in 2019 to help determine which materials I was least likely to have an allergic reaction to. I did a lot of research including contacting the companies who made the dental products to try to get the exact ingredients to confirm that they did not contain dyes or pigments that I am allergic to. Then everything got postponed b/c of the pandemic and now I will finally be getting the dental fillings.

The Clifford Test is controversial (and I am not even convinced myself that it is legit) but I felt that in my case, it was better than nothing. It allowed me to choose materials that I was (hopefully) least reactive to and then do my own research re: the ingredients.

My #1 goal is to avoid anaphylaxis or a severe allergic reaction with the entire process (including the dental anesthesia, materials in the composite/resin, bonding materials, etchant, etc). My #2 goal is that my body does not reject the composite fillings over the long-term (once they are drilled into my teeth/gums) and re-trigger my autoimmunity that is in remission.

In my case, there will not be any amalgams or mercury used (and I've never had any mercury/amalgam fillings in the past) and I am not worried about heavy metals vs. the issues that I mentioned above.
 
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I talked to one dentist who says she uses Admira Flo, made by the same company. I don't know if that would be as good as Admira Fusion.
 

Irat

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I talked to one dentist who says she uses Admira Flo, made by the same company. I don't know if that would be as good as Admira Fusion.
Ups sorry deleted my comment .I don t know myself,just looked up in our group and many do fine with this admira fusion.don t know if this is the same