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D-lactic Acidosis: Successful Suppression of D-lactate–Producing Lactobacillus by Probiotics [Aug 2018]

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I believe I caused problems for myself by regularly taking a probiotic which contains D-Lactate producing bacteria while also undergoing immunosuppressive treatment (very silly in hindsight, I just understood it was a general "helps digestion" supplement).

I'm taking a probiotic with a series of the Bifidus species mentioned above (although not the exact same strains, which are more pricey) as well as a no-carb diet to see if things improve.
 

Judee

Psalm 46:1-3
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JES

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Interesting, but the treatment is nothing novel. The probiotic cocktail they mention was:

Therefore, a probiotic cocktail with non-D-lactate–producing bacteria (Pro4-50 D-Lactate Free Multistrain Probiotic capsules [Spectrumceuticals, Sydney, Australia] containing 25 billion colony-forming units [CFUs] of L rhamnosus GG, 15 billion CFUs of Bifidobacterium (B) lactis BS01, 5 billion CFUs of B breve BR03, and 5 billion CFUs of B longum BL03) was introduced into his daily treatment.

These are among the most common probiotic strains you can find on the market. L. rhamnosus GG can be found everywhere in my country even as a stand-alone probiotic.

So as long as the probiotic mixture does not contain D-lactate producing strains, it should be very easy to trial this and people with ME/CFS have already tried these common strains at least.
 

datadragon

Senior Member
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Anaerostipes caccae and the two Anaerobutyricum species, A. soehngenii and A. hallii were described to be capable of converting d‐ and l‐lactate plus acetate to butyrate via the acetyl CoA pathway https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7702098/ As there is low acetyl CoA from low butyrate, looks like you need sodium butyrate to restart that process. No more itaconate shunt.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6333934/

A reminder that in the fecal metabolome, the % butyrate was increased in the NoPEM group compared with both the PEM and control groups...
 
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Messages
12
Interesting, but the treatment is nothing novel. The probiotic cocktail they mention was:



These are among the most common probiotic strains you can find on the market. L. rhamnosus GG can be found everywhere in my country even as a stand-alone probiotic.

So as long as the probiotic mixture does not contain D-lactate producing strains, it should be very easy to trial this and people with ME/CFS have already tried these common strains at least.
L. rhamnosusus GG is definitely very common (Culturelle), but the other strains are not common at all. Even most probiotics advertising Bifidobacterium species (B. Lactis, B. Breve, B. Longum) will not contain these specific strains (B. Lactis BS01, B. Breve BR03, B. Longum BL03.)
 
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