Could it be inflammation?

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Not always but sometimes my eyesight gets blurry. Sometimes it's clear. I do notice more blur on bad days. Also more blur after a shower for a few hours.
Anyone else experience this or know cause???
 

Dechi

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Yes, sometimes I have blurry vision. I think it’s a pretty common symptom with ME. I would think it has to do with brain hypoperfusion and incorrect processing of visual information. Just a guess.
 

Wishful

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Probably not inflammation, at least not directly. Just part of ME/CFS for some people. I tend to get blurry eyes while driving, but I think that's just the air blowing and drying out the liquid film.

I'll take this opportunity to hijack the title, one thing I've noticed is that t-cell type inflammation makes my pores produce much more (and thicker?) sebum. On a day with minimal inflammation, scraping my fingernail across my nose might collect a small amount of sebum. The last few days, with a sprained arm causing inflammation, my fingernail collects much larger amounts of thick, white sebum. I've noticed this with other t-cell type inflammation. A quick googling supports the connection between chronic inflammation and acne, though it doesn't clearly state that inflammation increases visible sebum secretion.

I'm not sure how common this response is in people. However, if it is, it's a simple way to tell if you are suffering from inflammation. For those of you who do suffer from chronic inflammation or frequent inflammatory events, pay attention to your sebum production (skin shininess, or scraping with a fingernail) and see if it correlates. Posting your responses would help others to find out if this is a useful test.
 
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Probably not inflammation, at least not directly. Just part of ME/CFS for some people. I tend to get blurry eyes while driving, but I think that's just the air blowing and drying out the liquid film.

I'll take this opportunity to hijack the title, one thing I've noticed is that t-cell type inflammation makes my pores produce much more (and thicker?) sebum. On a day with minimal inflammation, scraping my fingernail across my nose might collect a small amount of sebum. The last few days, with a sprained arm causing inflammation, my fingernail collects much larger amounts of thick, white sebum. I've noticed this with other t-cell type inflammation. A quick googling supports the connection between chronic inflammation and acne, though it doesn't clearly state that inflammation increases visible sebum secretion.

I'm not sure how common this response is in people. However, if it is, it's a simple way to tell if you are suffering from inflammation. For those of you who do suffer from chronic inflammation or frequent inflammatory events, pay attention to your sebum production (skin shininess, or scraping with a fingernail) and see if it correlates. Posting your responses would help others to find out if this is a useful test.
My night driving vision is bad.
I have had shiny skin since teen. I produce alot of sebum or lymph fluid under my skin.
 

Wishful

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I have had shiny skin since teen. I produce alot of sebum or lymph fluid under my skin.
I had oily skin too, and acne and rosacea. The point is that I found that it correlated with my other symptoms. This effect must have been occurring for many years before I noticed it, so I assume that other people have the same response and haven't noticed it. I suppose that washing one's face daily and using strong cleansers, antibacterials, etc, will make it harder to notice. I just thought I would point it out as an answer to the title. If this effect is common, then people who ask themselves 'Am I suffering from inflammation?' can check their skin, at least if they know how much sebum they produce when not inflammed.
 

Wishful

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My sore arm abruptly felt better two days ago. It's still sore when I try to use it, but there was a definite difference in how it felt. I assume that's the difference between inflamed and not inflamed. Once that change happened, my skin changed from very oily (and thick white stuff coming out of pores) to normal level of oil, and the pores releasing small amounts of clear oil when scraped. Sebum production certainly seems like a good marker for inflammation.