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Copper Identified as a Main Culprit in Alzheimer's Disease

alex3619

Senior Member
Messages
13,810
Location
Logan, Queensland, Australia
The copper is good is theoretical ex vivo (in vitro) research I think, I have yet to read the actual paper. The copper is bad is in vivo research, so is superior, except that it is in mice, and may not translate to humans.

What is of interest is that copper can damage the blood brain barrier .. which is of concern in ME.
 

jeffrez

Senior Member
Messages
1,112
Location
NY
The copper is good is theoretical ex vivo (in vitro) research I think, I have yet to read the actual paper. The copper is bad is in vivo research, so is superior, except that it is in mice, and may not translate to humans.

What is of interest is that copper can damage the blood brain barrier .. which is of concern in ME.


Exactly, Alex. My thinking for a while has been that the BBB is already to some degree compromised in some people with ME/CFS, and almost certainly those of us with chemical sensitivities. The concern is that we might be even more susceptible to neurological insults like the ones apparently found in this study from copper.
 

wdb

Senior Member
Messages
1,392
Location
London
It doesn't look like this is confirmed yet
Mixed evidence
Commenting on the latest findings, Chris Exley, professor of bioinorganic chemistry at Keele University, said there was "no true consensus" on the role of copper in Alzheimer's disease.

His research on human brains reached the opposite conclusion: "In our most recent work we found evidence of lower total brain copper with ageing and Alzheimer's. We also found that lower brain copper correlated with higher deposition of beta amyloid in brain tissue.

"He said at the moment we would expect copper to be protective and beneficial in neurodegeneration, not the instigator, but we don't know.

"The exposure levels used mean that if copper is acting in the way they think it does in this study then it must be doing so in everyone."

Dr Eric Karran, from Alzheimer's Research UK, said: "While the findings present clues to how copper could contribute to features of Alzheimer's in mice, the results will need replicating in further studies. It is too early to know how normal exposure to copper could be influencing the development or progression of Alzheimer's in people. "

Dr Doug Brown, from the Alzheimer's Society, said: "Considering copper is a vital mineral for the body, people should treat these results with caution and not cut it out of their diet. More research is needed to understand the role that copper might play in the brain."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-23755037