Constipation and Cold body

Messages
41
Likes
43
I have had mild constipation since I was a kid and also suffered with cold limbs. About 3 years ago my constipation got pretty bad. I began to eat more vegetables for fiber and take a magnesium citrate supplement ( which helped a lot)

About three weeks ago I began taking Graviola for another reason and realized that it was making me extremely dehydrated (no matter how much I drank) which lead my constipation to become worse, so I stopped taking it

Fast forward 3 weeks later. I usually take my magnesium citrate at night (since it relaxed me a bit for bed.) 2 days ago I forgot to take my dose, so I took it the next day. That day I had a BM but it was like pebbles. Yesterday I took extra magnesium and milk thistle. I feel the need to use the bathroom but it was the worst constipation I had in 2 years. I decided that I'm going to load up on fiber for, the next few weeks, reduce me protein intake for now and drink lots of water.

I suffer from cold limbs for as long as I can remember. Yesterday after having my BM, about an hour later I decided it was time to go to bed. For some reason, I was shivering under my blanket. I had to put on 2 pairs of socks and gloves because I was so cold. Sometime during the night I took them off (I wasn't aware of doing this, but figure my body was warm enough, since I woke up without them) Sleeping with socks is never comfortable for me. lol

*I'm thinking maybe I was so cold because my nervous system was in shock from all the stress I went through in the last few his to have a BM. I'm not sure, but does anyone have a theory?

I have some turkey rhubarb coming in the mail today. I heard it's great for constipation. Constipation is not joke. I feel for the people that have to go through this on a daily basis. I don't use fleet enemas, but I just found out that you can become dependent on something as natural as magnesium citrate.
 

pamojja

Senior Member
Messages
1,432
Likes
1,735
Location
Austria
https://forums.phoenixrising.me/ind...n-treatment-and-vulva-pain.52825/#post-875157

Constipation is not joke. ..., but I just found out that you can become dependent on something as natural as magnesium citrate.
That sounds rather a bid odd assessment to me. Of course we as humans are indeed dependent on daily external supplies of essential vitamins, minerals and amino acids, oxygen and water the body isn't able to synthesis. That has always been and will always be as living systems. Just as we are dependent on breathing and food and movement and whatnot. Also needs can be highly individual.
 
Messages
41
Likes
43
https://forums.phoenixrising.me/ind...n-treatment-and-vulva-pain.52825/#post-875157



That sounds rather a bid odd assessment to me. Of course we as humans are indeed dependent on daily external supplies of essential vitamins, minerals and amino acids, oxygen and water the body isn't able to synthesis. That has always been and will always be as living systems. Just as we are dependent on breathing and food and movement and whatnot. Also needs can be highly individual.
Yeah, I think getting magnesium through food sources is fine, but supplementing with it daily is not. I found several sites that say supplement is not the best.
"Magnesium citrate can also be used to relieve routine constipation. However, WebMD cautions that milder laxatives should be used for this purpose because some patients develop a dependence on magnesium citrate and become unable to have a normal bowel movement without first taking it. "
https://www.newsmax.com/fastfeatures/magnesium-citrate-risks-problems/2016/05/09/id/727938/

I know hemp protein powder is a good source of magnesium and fiber, and I had a package just sitting there (tastes gross to me) but decided to use it.
 

pamojja

Senior Member
Messages
1,432
Likes
1,735
Location
Austria
Yeah, I think getting magnesium through food sources is fine, but supplementing with it daily is not.
Well, what to say. With a severe Mg-deficiency I had to take supplemented oral elemental Mg at about 1.5 g per day just to avoid most severe very pain-full muscle cramps for the last 10 years, beside getting 0.7 g/d of Mg from food. Only Mg-sulfate IVs since November last year ceased these cramps completely.

Don't think to be deficient in a essential mineral involved into up to 300 enzymatic reactions is even optional. Unless one wants to accumulate a whole assortment of chronic diseases and take a dozens of prescription meds for the rest of one's short life. WebMD of course would applaud, for all its pharmaceuticals sponsors.

Also, the more active against constipation I consider actually ascorbic acid, which is still endogenously produced in mammals of same weight as humans at about 20 g per day from glucose (an amount most couldn't take orally without causing diarrhea). These same mammals produce endogenously up to 50-60 g/d on the spot in the case of infections.

Humans and primates had a genetic mutation which disabled the endogenous synthesis of ascorbic acid. All pharmaceuticals have side-effects. The only side-effects of magnesium and ascorbic acid is instant diarrhea, which easily can prevented by finding the optimal individual dose where this doesn't happen. With only beneficial side-benefits.
 

Moof

Senior Member
Messages
589
Likes
1,548
Location
UK
I think you can theoretically become dependent on various things with constipation – the thinking is that they make the bowel lazy.

I've had constipation all my life, except for when I became severely intolerant of potatoes (which gave me the opposite for three years!). On the advice of my GP, I just try to let my body do what it wants, when it wants for most of the time – but if a couple of weeks go by with no BM, I try one of several strategies.

These include eating three or four apples in a short time, taking a big dose of vitamin C, taking some senna, using a sachet of the med the doctor gave me, or (if I'm capable of it at the time), scrubbing the bathroom floor. I know how weird the latter sounds, but inactivity does contribute to constipation quite a bit, and somehow the action of scrubbing a floor on hands and knees really helps! :rofl:

My GP's opinion is that in the past, too much emphasis was put on daily BMs as being the desired norm. For a significant proportion of the population, it isn't normal – some people's 'regular' is once a week, every four days, or whatever. He's encouraged me to stop worrying about it and only intervene if it's just been too long, or I'm feeling really uncomfortable.

I hope you manage to find strategies that work for you, @Mylifesobright – you're right, it isn't funny when it gets really bad! :)
 
Messages
5,678
Likes
14,291
Location
Alabama USA
I do take chelated magnesium it has helped with my myalgia pain and am able to function much better.
My DO, MD does support me supplementing and has helped me to become much more stable in many ways that my body was not functioning.

Big pharma does feed web Md. I look at WebMD like Wikipedia, a good place to begin to put my toe in the information. I trust the people on this board more than anyone, including some Drs.
 

Wolfcub

Moderator
Messages
2,273
Likes
5,529
Location
SW UK
@Mylifesobright the real wonder foods for constipation are:
Apples (with skins)
Lentils of any kind but particularly puy lentils and whole green lentils
Beans and chickpeas (but lentils work better, though chickpeas are very good)
Beetroot. Not just a slice or two pickled or something, but a couple of whole roots with dinner.
Turnips (swede turnips are good)
Flax seeds (if you can stomach them) a dessertspoon on cereal or fruit salad.
Chia seeds.

These are the best. The list goes on though. And there are other things like celery, dark leafies, tomatoes, etc.
Oh yes, and enough water.

Those foods aren't going to have a drastic laxative effect and shouldn't cause side effects if you are used to eating fibre. But they will help a LOT towards a natural bowel movement daily, if some of them are eaten daily.
Coffee in the morning helps too!

If you can do it without Big Pharma -better for you.
 

PatJ

Forum Support Assistant
Messages
3,465
Likes
10,264
Location
Canada
I'm thinking maybe I was so cold because my nervous system was in shock from all the stress I went through in the last few his to have a BM.
A BM requires more blood to be redirected to the colon. You may have low blood pressure and/or poor circulation (cold limbs are one sign of this). I have low BP and sometimes feel very drowsy before a BM due to the associated BP drop. In your case the BM and blood redirection might be leading to even lower BP and feeling very cold. If the BM was incomplete then maybe your body was still trying to move more through your colon which left you feeling cold for a longer period.

Cayenne might help to relieve the coldness in your limbs by increasing circulation. Some people (including me) take cayenne tea 3 times per day. They usually start with 1/16 of a teaspoon, then work up, sometimes up to 1 teaspoon per serving. I haven't been able to get past 1/8 tsp per dose. It's hot stuff.

Cascara Sagrada might be helpful in the short term, and possibly long term (after short term use) for constipation. I read this yesterday:
From Richard Whelan, Herbalist: https://www.rjwhelan.co.nz/herbs A-Z/cascara.html

[Meaning] Many of the 16th century Spanish explorers who first visited Northern California suffered terribly from constipation and the local Indians had a solution which was such a profound relief to those who were suffering that the Spanish named it Cascara sagrada -- Sacred bark.

[Toning] Cascara may have great value when there has been a loss of tone in the rectum as can happen from certain types of diseases that affect the bowel or as a long-term consequence of an abdominal surgery.

[Soft stool] Cascara has also been widely used when a soft stool needs to be guaranteed, such as when there are anal fissures or haemorrhoids.

[Best for chronic constipation] H Felter writes 'Cascara is a simple and practically non-griping purgative, acting with but little or no prostration and never causing a watery stool. It has, moreover, a tonic action upon the stomach and bowels, and does not produce an after constipation. It is the most popular and most efficient agent for chronic constipation, and may be given for a considerable time without increase of dosage. In fact, the dose may be gradually decreased from day to day often with the result of completely curing the constipation. Cascara is adapted to cases of atony of the intestines. It is an efficient purgative in pregnancy, in hemorrhoids with loss of rectal tone, in atonic dyspepsia, and in sick headache due to atonic sluggishness of the bowels.'

[Good for sensitive people] M Grieve writes 'Cascara Sagrada is a mild laxative, acting principally on the large intestine. It is considered suitable for delicate and elderly persons, and may with advantage be given in chronic constipation, being generally administered in the form of the fluid extract. It acts also as a stomachic tonic and bitter, in small doses, promoting gastric digestion and appetite...

[Non-habit forming] T Bartram describes Cascara's action as a 'non-habit forming stimulant laxative, pancreatic stimulant and bitter tonic' and says its uses are for 'habitual constipation, torpor of low bowel, congestion of liver and gall duct. To assist liver function in cirrhosis and for foul breath' He suggests doses of half to 1 tsp at night with honey to sweeten.

[Safety] There is a definite concern with the overuse of Cascara that it can cause disturbances of electrolyte function that could lead to muscle weakness or a disorder of heart function. Some of the literature will talk about a staining of the bowel from its use but this has been determined to be harmless and soon reverses after discontinuing the herb.

[Pairs with...] Plenty of Fennel seed and/or Licorice root extract is usually added to the Cascara extract to reduce the chance of griping.

[Possible dependency] The main worry with Cascara is that of developing a bowel dependency and many people who go on to use this herb on a regular basis do become dependent on it. The reason this in turn is a concern if if the bowel loses its own muscle tone and therefore becomes weakened.

The time the alarm bells should start ringing in this case is when, over time, more frequent or higher doses are required to get the same effect.

To balance this concern, it should be fairly stated that it would be far worse for a person to be exposed to the considerable toxicity (let alone the considerable discomfort!) of chronic constipation that it would be to have a dependency on a largely harmless herb.

From: https://jonbarron.org/herbal-library/herbs/cascara-sagrada
[Permanent fix] Possibly one of the herb’s most valuable properties is that long-term usage is typically not necessary. Not only does the herb alleviate constipation but may also “cure” it as well. According to the Dispensatory of the United States, "It often appears to restore tone to the relaxed bowel and in this way produces a permanent beneficial effect." It literally gives the muscles in your bowel a work-out so they can be strong again and do their job.

[How it works] Early plant chemists have identified the active laxative constituents in cascara sagrada bark as anthraquinone derivatives. These compounds stimulate peristalsis, the vigorous wavelike contractions of the large intestine that keep food moving through the digestive system. When cascara speeds the process up, the body produces a softer, quicker bowel movement because the intestine has had less chance to absorb the liquid from the stool. Several studies have shown that cascara sagrada is effective in easing chronic constipation in elderly people.

Not considered safe for long term use, from: https://draxe.com/cascara-sagrada/
* According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), “Cascara is generally safe and well tolerated, but can cause adverse events including clinically apparent liver injury when used in high doses for longer than recommended periods … Liver injury from long term cascara use is rare and most cases have been self-limited and rapidly reversible upon stopping the laxative. However, severe cases with acute liver failure and development of ascites and portal hypertension have been described.” (https://livertox.nih.gov/Cascara.htm)
* This is exactly why cascara sagrada supplements are typically only considered safe for a one week maximum of usage and recommended dosages should not be exceeded.
 

PatJ

Forum Support Assistant
Messages
3,465
Likes
10,264
Location
Canada
As @Wolfcub mentioned, flax is useful. It works well as a stool softener: well ground flax seed (1 tablespoon 1-3 times per day). Soak in warm water for 10 minutes to let it absorb the water and thicken. Flax contains soluble and insoluble fiber.

Note that flax is high in omega-3 fatty acids. These can lower blood pressure. I can't take more 1 tablespoon per day without my BP dropping so much that I can barely stay awake.

Here's some more info:
"Soluble fibers such as pectin hold moisture in the stool and prevent it from becoming hard and dry." They also form a gel that helps stool to move through the colon.

"Insoluble fibers prevent constipation and form the basis of soft, bulky stool. Whole grain foods, dark leafy vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds all contain insoluble fiber."

Taurine, glycine to increase bile salts, from Gondwanaland on PR:
I found it is pretty logical that Taurine would help with constipation since it increases the bile salts pool as well as Glycine (via conjugation). Just basic metabolism. Under this light, MgGLY is also a good candidate to help with constipation if the cause is poor bile conjugation. My husband gets diarrhea from MgGLY.

Currently I tolerate Mg Aspartate. Since it doesn't help with constipation, I use Taurine for that. Taurine also improves fat digestion.
The only form of Mg that helps me with constipation is Mg Citrate, but it causes tinnitus + brain fog (if I recall correctly, citrate inhibits Tyrosinase), so I avoid it.

She takes between 150-300mg of taurine.

Taurine cofactor (molybdenum) - Make sure to consume foods that are good sources of molybdenum since it's a cofactor for taurine. Good food sources (in order of content) include lentils, dried peas, various beans (limas, kidneys, black, soy, pintos, and garbanzos), oats, tomatos romaine lettuce, cucumber, celery, barley, carrots, bell peppers, fennel, eggs, yogurt, sesame seeds, walnuts, almonds. (http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=128)

Cayenne, from: http://www.herbslist.net/cayenne-pepper-for-constipation.html
Cayenne pepper has been used for hundreds of years as a home remedy for constipation. It works by promoting peristalsis, the contraction of the large intestine. It also promotes good digestion. When eaten, it is soothing to the digestive tract and also increases saliva and secretions in the stomach. These help to digest food properly.

Low potassium, magnesium, from absorbplus.com:
When it comes to mineral deficiency, low potassium can cause constipation. There is a constant outflow of potassium from the intestinal muscle cell to the outside of the cell. When blood potassium is low, more potassium leaves the cell. As more potassium flows out of the cell, it makes the cell more resistant to the transmission of current across its membrane and therefore, less likely to contract and move stool efficiently.

Low magnesium is also associated with low potassium and therefore, may cause constipation. Low calcium can be accompanied by low magnesium, but is not a cause of constipation – high calcium leads to constipation.

Probiotics, from gutsense.org:
https://www.gutsense.org/gutsense/flora.html
Constipation is one of the most prominent signs, especially when the stools are dry or hard. This means there is too little bacteria to loosen up the formed feces and keep them moist, because, unlike other stool components, bacterial cells retain moisture.

High quality probiotics taken on an empty stomach can be useful to restore the necessary bacteria. L-Glutamine is useful because it "stimulates the regeneration of intestinal mucosa that is actually “home” and source of nourishment for intestinal bacteria."

"How long do I have to take intestinal flora?
The content of your toilet bowl will tell you. If your stools are light, fluffy, small, and moist without fiber in your diet, you‘re okay flora-wise. I also recommend rotating various brands of probiotics for optimal effect."

Coconut oil, from Grizz on CureZone:
My favorite for constipation (and hard stools) is coconut oil. Slowly work your way up to a tablespoon. If you take too much to start, diarrhea will be the result. Start with 1/2 tsp and slowly increase.
 
Messages
41
Likes
43
I think you can theoretically become dependent on various things with constipation – the thinking is that they make the bowel lazy.

I've had constipation all my life, except for when I became severely intolerant of potatoes (which gave me the opposite for three years!). On the advice of my GP, I just try to let my body do what it wants, when it wants for most of the time – but if a couple of weeks go by with no BM, I try one of several strategies.

These include eating three or four apples in a short time, taking a big dose of vitamin C, taking some senna, using a sachet of the med the doctor gave me, or (if I'm capable of it at the time), scrubbing the bathroom floor. I know how weird the latter sounds, but inactivity does contribute to constipation quite a bit, and somehow the action of scrubbing a floor on hands and knees really helps! :rofl:

My GP's opinion is that in the past, too much emphasis was put on daily BMs as being the desired norm. For a significant proportion of the population, it isn't normal – some people's 'regular' is once a week, every four days, or whatever. He's encouraged me to stop worrying about it and only intervene if it's just been too long, or I'm feeling really uncomfortable.

I hope you manage to find strategies that work for you, @Mylifesobright – you're right, it isn't funny when it gets really bad! :)
I think you can theoretically become dependent on various things with constipation – the thinking is that they make the bowel lazy.

I've had constipation all my life, except for when I became severely intolerant of potatoes (which gave me the opposite for three years!). On the advice of my GP, I just try to let my body do what it wants, when it wants for most of the time – but if a couple of weeks go by with no BM, I try one of several strategies.

These include eating three or four apples in a short time, taking a big dose of vitamin C, taking some senna, using a sachet of the med the doctor gave me, or (if I'm capable of it at the time), scrubbing the bathroom floor. I know how weird the latter sounds, but inactivity does contribute to constipation quite a bit, and somehow the action of scrubbing a floor on hands and knees really helps! :rofl:

My GP's opinion is that in the past, too much emphasis was put on daily BMs as being the desired norm. For a significant proportion of the population, it isn't normal – some people's 'regular' is once a week, every four days, or whatever. He's encouraged me to stop worrying about it and only intervene if it's just been too long, or I'm feeling really uncomfortable.

I hope you manage to find strategies that work for you, @Mylifesobright – you're right, it isn't funny when it gets really bad! :)
Those are good suggestions. I actually have noticed when I use to exercise frequently at the gym things were a lot smoother. I definitely need to start exercising again.

I couldn't imagine going once a week. I've always gone daily, but it's obvious It is still obvious I have constipation. The only times where I have gone more than 3 days have been few and I knew if was in for hell once I needed to go. If a healthy person go once a week though, I guess that is fine as long as they as it doesn't bother them physically.
 
Messages
41
Likes
43
Well, what to say. With a severe Mg-deficiency I had to take supplemented oral elemental Mg at about 1.5 g per day just to avoid most severe very pain-full muscle cramps for the last 10 years, beside getting 0.7 g/d of Mg from food. Only Mg-sulfate IVs since November last year ceased these cramps completely.
Thanks. Yesterday, I took 1 gram of magnesium and some fiber. Things are a little better.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Messages
41
Likes
43
@Mylifesobright the real wonder foods for constipation are:
Apples (with skins)
Lentils of any kind but particularly puy lentils and whole green lentils
Beans and chickpeas (but lentils work better, though chickpeas are very good)
Beetroot. Not just a slice or two pickled or something, but a couple of whole roots with dinner.
Turnips (swede turnips are good)
Flax seeds (if you can stomach them) a dessertspoon on cereal or fruit salad.
Chia seeds.

These are the best. The list goes on though. And there are other things like celery, dark leafies, tomatoes, etc.
Oh yes, and enough water.

Those foods aren't going to have a drastic laxative effect and shouldn't cause side effects if you are used to eating fibre. But they will help a LOT towards a natural bowel movement daily, if some of them are eaten daily.
Coffee in the morning helps too!

If you can do it without Big Pharma -better for you.
Thanks for the list. I'm actually following the AIP diet right now, but I do hope to reintroduce lentils in the future.

This experience made me realize how important water is. I mean, I was drinking the average, but if I'm trying to shoot for a gallon a day. I have an app on my phone that reminds me every hour :)
 
Last edited:
Messages
41
Likes
43
A BM requires more blood to be redirected to the colon. You may have low blood pressure and/or poor circulation (cold limbs are one sign of this). I have low BP and sometimes feel very drowsy before a BM due to the associated BP drop. In your case the BM and blood redirection might be leading to even lower BP and feeling very cold. If the BM was incomplete then maybe your body was still trying to move more through your colon which left you feeling cold for a longer period.

Cayenne might help to relieve the coldness in your limbs by increasing circulation. Some people (including me) take cayenne tea 3 times per day. They usually start with 1/16 of a teaspoon, then work up, sometimes up to 1 teaspoon per serving. I haven't been able to get past 1/8 tsp per dose. It's hot stuff.


Cascara Sagrada might be helpful in the short term, and possibly long term (after short term use) for constipation. I read this yesterday:
What you say makes a lot of sense. That's probably what happened.

I wish I could take cayenne, but I have a sensitive stomach and it hurts me, plus it's not allowed on the AIP diet which I am on. I have some rhubarb which is coming in the mail tomorrow. It's supposed to be good for constipation. Going by the reviews I've read, a lot of people seem to have success with it. I will give an update on it in a few days. I hope it doesn't cause stomach aches, because that is a side effect for some.

I love Whelan's site. I came across it a few months ago. The Cascara Sagrada is tempting. I will see how it goes first with the rhubarb, then I'll buy the Cascara.