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Collagen Peptides Supplements

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It's a fairly standard, fairly expensive formulation.

You might want to take a look at Great Lakes gelatin, which provides pretty much the same thing, only slightly less processed, and somewhat less expensive. Converting gelatin, already highly processed, into collagen increases the amount and degree of processing and free glutamic acid, which can play merry havoc with your GABA/Glutamate balance and neuro-transmittors, if you're at all sensitive to glutamate ....
 

Strawberry

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I also have this same question. I have tried collagen peptides twice now, for several months at a time. I never notice any improvement at all. My best friend notices it in her hair and nails and skin, but I seem to get zero benefit. I would also like to know if anyone ever benefitted from collagen peptides.
 
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The immune system is likely to react to collagen as it is fairly close to human proteins. Even peptides ie hydrolyzed collagen can provoke a reaction.

BTW Your body needs histidine because it is required to make carnosine from histidine and beta-alanine. Carnosine helps eliminate lactic acid and might be a contributing factor in PEM. Histidine being directed towards excessive histamine production leading to a deficiency of much needed carnosine and resulting lactic acid build up.

Sergei Severin (S.E. Severin) from Russia found in 1953 that Carnosine, which is produced in the human body from histidine and beta-alanine, reduces lactic acid build up in muscles.
 
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BTW Your body needs histidine because it is required to make carnosine from histidine and beta-alanine. Carnosine helps eliminate lactic acid and might be a contributing factor in PEM. Histidine being directed towards excessive histamine production leading to a deficiency of much needed carnosine and resulting lactic acid build up.
Wow I never knew that. Thanks for that info about the carnosine. Have you personally tried Carnosine and did you receive any benefits?
 
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pogoman

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I've been taking the Great Lakes Gelatin for about half a year now, helps with energy and IBS symptoms from what I've noticed.
Not sure if its related but cuts and scrapes heal quicker.
Collagens are smaller incomplete versions of proteins simple explanation.

There are several types of collagen that work on different parts of the body.
Great Lakes is hydrolized and bovine sourced which is mostly type 1 and 3 collagens which help muscles so that is what I take for now.
Chicken sourced collagen is mostly type 2 which helps cartilage.

There's also marine and porcine sourced collagen.

https://www.jeuneora.co.nz/blogs/news/understanding-the-different-types-and-sources-of-collagen
 
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Not sure if its related but cuts and scrapes heal quicker.
Def related. Healing of wounds is one of the essential jobs of amino acids/ proteins/ collagen, along with substantial amounts of Vit C ...
Collagens are smaller incomplete versions of proteins simple explanation.
They're not incomplete proteins, they're just different chains. Each protein function usually uses different chains of amino acids. Collagen is a protein chain made specifically from glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and arginine, and will address whatever need it's applied to: ie, if you need to repair connective tissue, the collagen chain will go there, if it's wound repair, that's where it'll go, etc ....

This is a highly simplified explanation of collagen and peptide chains, but it's accurate, if brief.
Great Lakes is hydrolized and bovine sourced which
All collagen as well as protein powders, like whey, are hydrolyzed, either by heat, or acids, to break down a complete protein form, like bovine skin or connective tissues, into its component parts in either powder or liquid form.
 

pogoman

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They're not incomplete proteins, they're just different chains. Each protein function usually uses different chains of amino acids. Collagen is a protein chain made specifically from glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and arginine, and will address whatever need it's applied to: ie, if you need to repair connective tissue, the collagen chain will go there, if it's wound repair, that's where it'll go, etc ....
Remember, simple explanation ;)
I realized last night I should have said "peptides" are smaller incomplete versions of proteins, not collagen.

From what I read peptides are between 2 and 50 amino acids in size and proteins consist of 50 or more amino acids.
https://www.britannica.com/story/what-is-the-difference-between-a-peptide-and-a-protein

The other difference I remember and why I said incomplete, collagen peptides only have 7 or less of the 8 essential amino acids.
I remember a different brand of collagen I bought referred to incomplete proteins.
My can of Great Lakes collagen shows zero tryptophan.

Of course going down the google rabbit hole of peptides and proteins there is a lot of contradictory information and terms, whatever one wants to call peptides right now it seems to be helping.
 
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Remember, simple explanation ;)
Uhhhh ... simple's cool, but accurate is good, too ....
whatever one wants to call peptides right now it seems to be helping.
For anyone else reading this thread, I think that gelatin (not collagen, which is even more highly processed and hydrolyzed) is a worthy experiment. It contributes to a number of important functions in our bodies, and unless you're EXTREMELY sensitive to glutamate, it's worth a try ....

From what I read peptides are between 2 and 50 amino acids in size and proteins consist of 50 or more amino acids.
Peptides are the shorter chains of amino acids that your body breaks proteins down to in order to address a particular need. They're short chains of amino acids, which can be as complete as a protein, as you noted above, or as short as BCAAs. The long, 50 amino chains are called polypeptides. An innumerable number of shorter chain peptides, of less than ten or fifteen amino acids, are deployed for specific purposes in our bodies, or are created as needed from either full spectrum proteins or several single aminos, and are called oligopeptides, and include dipeptides, tripeptides, and tetrapeptides.

Gelatin (I like Great Lakes, too) provides everything you need except for tryptophan, which can be easily obtained from a wide range of foods, from nuts and seeds to meat, turkey especially, cheese, milk, chicken, yoghurt, fish, and eggs, and one or two fruits ....

And that pretty much exhausts my immediately available knowledge of amino acids, proteins, and peptides ...