CMV IgG -> 11,2, body still pumping antibodies?

jason30

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Hi all,

From what I read is that IgM is more important than IgG when determining active infection.
IgG relates to a past infection.

I have got a virus 3 weeks ago and that shut me down, bedridden. Since 3 years, every time when I get an innocent virus or sinus infection, I also get this weak legs. I just can't stand on my legs anymore. This goes away when I take lysine and vitamin C. Because of this, I was thinking that there is more going on. I was thinking about an active infection.

Blood results March, 6th
CMV IgG: 11,2
CMV IgM: 0.134

Besides this, my leukocyten is 4 (4-10) and reticulocyten is low : 24 (25/120).

Does the CMV IgG 11,2 means that my body is still pumping out antibodies to the CMV?

Tia.
 

Hip

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From what I read is that IgM is more important than IgG when determining active infection.
IgG relates to a past infection.
ME/CFS doctors interpret viral test results differently to infectious diseases (ID) doctors.

If IgM is low (as yours is), then ID doctors will ignore high IgG, saying that it does not mean anything, and results from an infection you had in the past.

Whereas ME/CFS doctors will interpret chronically high IgG titers as evidence for ongoing active infection.


What are the reference ranges for your lab results?
 

jason30

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Thanks Hip.

Delicious that difference of interpretation :D

With references:
  • CMV IgG: 11,2 (titer (AU) \ positive >=6; boundary : 4 - 6; negatief <4
  • CMV as. IgM: 0.134 (positive >=1,1; boundary 0,9 - <1,1; negative <0,9)
 

Hip

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I am not an expert, but it does not look like your IgG titers are high. Negative IgG threshold is 4, and your IgG titer is 11.2, which is not much above the negative threshold.

When you see IgG titers that ME/CFS doctors consider high, they are typically around 30 times the negative threshold value.

To find out which virus(es) might be behind your ME/CFS, ME/CFS doctors will give antibody tests for the full range of viruses linked to ME/CFS, and then look for any virus which has high IgG titers.
 
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jason30

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Good to know that it's not really much above the negative threshold, comparing to what a ME/CFS doctor consider high.

EBV Viral Capsid Antigen (EBV VCA-IgG) and EBV Nuclear Antigen (EBV NA -IgG) was also positive,
but EBV Viral Capsid Antigen (EBV VCA-IgM) is negative so no active EBV infection.

I am gonna check for a ME/CFS which can test for other viruses as well. I really have this strong belief that a virus plays a role in my symptoms.

Thanks again!
 

Hip

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EBV Viral Capsid Antigen (EBV VCA-IgG) and EBV Nuclear Antigen (EBV NA -IgG) was also positive,
but EBV Viral Capsid Antigen (EBV VCA-IgM) is negative so no active EBV infection.
If you have high EBV EA IgG titers, Dr Lerner would look at that as evidence of a chronic active infection, even if EBV VCA IgM is negative.

Note that:
EA = early antigen
VCA = virus capsid antigen (also denoted by CA)
EBNA = Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen
 
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Hip

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That's interesting! Unfortunately EBV EA IgG is not measured, but I am gonna request this one as well.
You can see the lab testa and rules that Dr Lerner and other ME/CFS doctors use to determine chronic active infection in ME/CFS in this mini roadmap.