Chronic fatigue syndrome and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

jepps

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Natasa, Candida also produces gluten:
www.denvernaturopathic.com/news/celiac.html

Now we come to what to me is the most interesting of the recent research regarding celiac. It seems fitting that the research again comes from Holland , where celiac disease was first linked to diet. Dr. Nieuwenhuizen, from the research group TNO Nutrition and Food Research, published a paper in the June, 2003, Lancet. He links celiac disease with Candida albicans. Dr. Nieuwenhuizen, knowing the actual sequence of proteins which trigger celiac disease from the published work of other scientists, had searched the databases available to him through TNO to see if the same sequence existed in other places. It turns out the identical sequence of proteins occur in the cell walls of Candida albicans. [15]

These Candida gluten-like proteins turn out to be the yeast's "hypha-specific surface protein" nicknamed Hwp1. This is the yeast's version of Velcro and allows it to attach and hang onto the endomysium in the wall of the intestine. It is also targeted by transglutaminase, the enzyme which acts on the gluten protein and serves as a target for immune antibodies. Candida species which don't have this Hwp1 protein can't attach themselves to the digestive tract. [16]

If Candida can trigger the same chemical and immunological reactions as wheat gluten do we can imagine a number of interesting implications.
First, in people with celiac disease, symptoms usually get better rapidly when they eliminate gluten from their diet. This isn't always the case. Even without gluten some people continue to have symptoms. They may have intestinal Candidiasis. The Candida in their gut may be acting like gluten and continues triggering symptoms.
Second, an acute Candida infection may trigger the onset of celiac disease. Even if the Candida is treated and eliminated, the person could be left with a permanent sensitivity to wheat gluten. Candida infections occur frequently with antibiotic usage. In people genetically susceptible to celiac, extra caution should be exercised when using antibiotics to prevent Candida overgrowth.
Third, if wheat can cause neurological damage as in gluten ataxia, it is reasonable to assume that Candida could also do so by the same process. Reports of Candida infections causing neurological symptoms are not uncommon; now we have a possible explanation.
Fourth, if only a small portion of the people with gluten ataxia have gastrointestinal symptoms despite their severe damage elsewhere in their bodies, it is reasonable to assume that Candida could stimulate significant problems while producing slight or no digestive symptoms.
Controversely, this means that with systemic Candida infection, the gluten-free diet is only successfully, when the Candida is declining, because the Candida pasts up the intestine with gluten.
And that with Candida infection the intestine is pasted up with gluten, as it can only can adhere with this protein, otherwise it is simply excreted.
Wherein the Candida produces gluten intolerance.
 
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jepps

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Thanks for the photo:sluggish:

Not depressive, ahmo, positive dont worry be happy.jpg

If candida triggers chronic gluten sensitivity, this could be one reason for chronic allergic reactions.
With chronic infections one goal must be, to detect and treat a possible candida infection, and to treat it by the natural way. The concept of the RS starch thread works, as my candida is excreted.
 

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ahmo

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Yess @jepps, you're right, :thumbsup:...Funny, this morning I woke up from a dream that I was now allergic to water!!!:lol:

Also, I'm hoping candida is the answer to my ongoing hi peroxynitrite or ammonia, or both, which in my confusion I can't distinguish! And that my current cleanse protocol, along with high doses of Bifidus Longum, will normalize my system.:woot:
 

jepps

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@jepps I am sorry I can't go through the whole enormous thread of RS... But would like to ask you what is your preferred RS.
Gondwanaland, I have a summary of the RS thread in word. I could e-mail it to you, if you are interested.
I take a mix of raw potatoe starch, LAG, apple pectine, inuline, fructo-oligofructose, psyllium, and RS from cooked and cooled rice.
 

Hip

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Natasa, Candida also produces gluten:
Very interesting, but I couldn't find much research on the subject.

I only found:

• A paper detailing the original finding that Candida albicans hyphal wall protein has amino acid sequences identical or very similar to those of gliadin, a component of gluten; and based on this, the hypothesis that Candida albicans may be a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease:

Is Candida albicans a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease?


• A report on a child with candidiasis who had elevated antibodies to gliadin (a component of gluten), with the antibody levels declining once the child had been treated with antifungals for the Candida:

Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis may cause elevated gliadin antibodies



But it is interesting that the more virulent and invasive hyphal form of Candida contains proteins very similar to gliadin. People might want to experiment with inhibiting the hyphal form of Candida: there are some supplements that inhibit this hyphal form. These include:

Candida hyphal form inhibitors:
Conjugated linoleic acid
Gymnema slyvestre
Dodonaea viscosa
 
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jepps

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dida:

Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis may cause elevated gliadin antibodies


But it is interesting that the more virulent and invasive hyphal form of Candida contains proteins very similar to gliadin. People might want to experiment with inhibiting the hyphal form of Candida: there are some supplements that inhibit this hyphal form. These include:

Candida hyphal form inhibitors:
Conjugated linoleic acid
Gymnema slyvestre
Dodonaea viscosa
In my understanding these transglutaminase proteins are the paste proteins, which enable candida to adhere to the intestine, and which induces the body to produce antibodies.
I think the problem with herbs is, that candida has to be treated very long, for months, maybe for 1-2 years. The long term use of herb extracts could impair the little healthy gut flora we have. I assume, better is the long term run with RS, prebiotics, probiotics, maybe Sanum, enzymes for the biofilms. It works, as I´m detoxing candida since August, as the stool tests show. The first months I had huge candida hyphen and mucus from the biofilms in the stool, I have no longer hyphen form in the stool, but the stool test shows still highest excretion of candida.
 
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Hip

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In my understanding these transglutaminase proteins are the paste proteins, which enable candida to adhere to the intestine, and which induces the body to produce antibodies.
My understanding is that the gliadin-like proteins are only found in the hyphal form of Candida, not in the yeast form of Candida.

Candida can switch between existing in the yeast form and the hyphal form. The hyphal morphology has better ability to penetrate into tissues and organs of the body, and to penetrate through the intestinal lining. This is why the hyphal Candida form is more virulent and invasive.

The supplements I listed above do not actually kill Candida, but impede its conversion from the yeast form to the hyphal form.

If only the hyphal form contains the gliadin-like proteins, then using these herbs to prevent Candida converting to the hyphal form should prevent these gliadin-like proteins from being produced.