CFS supplement list . What works and what doesn’t.

Messages
30
Likes
17
I’ve had cfs for a number of years now and it’s been only getting worse over the years . I guess you could say the fatigue started as a 6/10 now it’s hitting a 8 or 9/10. What are some supplements that you found gave benefit to your symptoms and what are the supplements you think didn’t help at all for ones with cfs to avoid . I know this disease affects everyone differently and would like to know what would possibly help reduce the severity of the fatigue .

I’m currently on
Zinc 50mg
Magnesium 500- 1000mg
All the B vitamins in methlyated form.
Selenium 150 mcg
Copper 5mg
Boron 10mg
Manganese 5mg
MSM( organic sulfur ) 3 gram
L- cartinine 3g
Alpha lipoid acid - 1.8g
Lugol Iodine - 6-15mg per day
Vitamin A, C,D, E, K
Omega 3s (High quality) - 3 gram per day

I believe all the vitamins and minerals I’m taking are helping with the cfs because I believe they are feeding /helping my mitochondria function better and if I don’t take my vitamins and minerals I generally feel more run down and fatigued then I normally would. What also has helped with my fatigue is a whole food nutrient dense diet. If I eat like crap I will feel more like crap generally so I try to stick with lots of fruits and Veges and meats . No sugar , gluten , dairy or processed foods .

I’ve tried a lot of antioxidant supplements like coq10 nac , glutathione, nad , sod and I feel like they don’t really do much for me . Maybe they helped a little but the results are minimal and I still feel extremely exhausted even on a ton of high powered antioxidants which are supposed to boost the mitochondrial function . Not to mention the fact that they are highly expensive/ money draining .

Do you guys have any recommendations for supplements that have helped you to promote healing ? If so I would find it interesting to see what you guys take to cope with your symptoms or things that have helped heal you along your journey with cfs . I would highly appreciate it . Thank you.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
324
Likes
581
Sometimes too many supplements can cause issues too. The ones you list all look familiar to me too, but after fixing my EPI I was able to stop most of the supplements and actually absorb it from food. I really like your focus on the nutrient dense food and cutting out the insults. Also keep in mind that 3 grams of fishoil is equivalent to about a pound of fish per day.

Have you checked whether you are absorbing the food properly? Please have a look at this thread in case it helps.

https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...y-epi-and-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-cfs.62997/
 

Learner1

Administrator
Messages
3,819
Likes
6,845
Location
Pacific Northwest
Many functional medicine doctors who treat ME/CFS use these supplements and more - the attached slide was presented by a clinician with over 20 years' experience with treating ME/CFS.
Sometimes too many supplements can cause issues too. The ones you list all look familiar to me too, but after fixing my EPI I was able to stop most of the supplements and actually absorb it from food. I really like your focus on the nutrient dense food and cutting out the insults. Also keep in mind that 3 grams of fishoil is equivalent to about a pound of fish per day.

Have you checked whether you are absorbing the food properly? Please have a look at this thread in case it helps.
Ensuring you're absorbing what you're ingesting is definitely a good idea. However, it is impossible to get 100% of the DV of every nutrient in under about 7,000 calories - dieticians hsve been challenged with doing it within a normal amount of calories and couldn't. And the DVs are aimed at staving of beri beri, scurvy, rickets, etc - they are not optimal values for health.

And, we sick people may need more nutrients thsn normal, healthy people, especially B vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, sphingolipids, etc.

But doing what random people on the internet say is good for ME/CFS may not be good for you - your needs may differ due to your genes, infections, autoimmunity, exposure to mold tocins or heavy metals, mitochondrial function, etc.

It's best to have comprehensive nutrient testing like a Genova Diagnostics NutrEval FMV with amino acids and vitamin D, which gives you your status for essential nutrients and where you can see what entire pathways are doing which can help you develop a plan that will work for you.
 

Attachments

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
324
Likes
581
I completely agree with Learner1. That FMV test is amazing! It saved me, and is one of the ones I also used to not only provide insights where there were issues, but also as a means to check whether supplementation needs to be adjusted either up or down. The test is biochemistry in practice, and one I wish every primary care physician or family practice doctor would do as a standard health maintenance check. It is a great indicator of nutrient deficiencies, microbiome dysbiosis, malabsorption, etc. The 'Essential and Metabolic Fatty Acids Markers' add-on is also very helpful. Great Plains Lab has a version as well called Organic Acid Test (OAT).

Others to perhaps consider in order to check for any absorption type issues:

Genova Diagnostics - Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis 2.0 with Parasitology, Fecal Fat Distribution, Elastase and Chymotrypsin. Doctor's Data has something similar as well.

Spectracell Micronutrient testing - checks for intra-cellular (white blood cells) nutrient levels. It was the only one that spotted my vitamin K deficiency at the time.

24 hour fecal fat test (indicator of pancreatic enzymes and malabsorption)

SIBO breath test (SIBO can cause malabsorption, mind fog and many other symptoms)

HbA1c (standard test. 6 week blood sugar average indicator of (pre-) diabetes and food intake quality)
 

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
324
Likes
581
Did it lead to any improvements in your ME/CFS?
Yes, in fact without that test I am quite certain I would not be here today. It was the first test that pointed to issues with malabsorption, pancreas enzymes, along with many nutrient deficiencies, as well as neurotransmitter, mitochondrial, SIBO, and Candida overgrowth issues. It introduced me to the Krebs cycle and biochemistry. This was years into my decline, and after 4 doctors had specifically told me my pancreas was fine. It pointed me in the direction of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), pancreas damage, malabsorption, and made me delve into metabolic pathways and their impact, mitochondrial functioning, etc. in order to improve my quality of life.

It helped me dig out of the hole of ME/CFS. From bedridden with no hope in sight to a functioning human again. It did take years, much research, experimentation, and many actions to turn the boat around, mainly cause none of my doctors were experienced with it. But, the FMV test was the first point of light for me.
 

Hip

Senior Member
Messages
12,774
Likes
23,513
It helped me dig out of the hole of ME/CFS. From bedridden with no hope in sight to a functioning human again.
Was there any specific intervention that you think created this large improvement? Would you say you are now moderate or mild?
 

pamojja

Senior Member
Messages
1,530
Likes
1,971
Location
Austria
Also keep in mind that 3 grams of fishoil is equivalent to about a pound of fish per day.
Actually even less than half a pound of fish. If comparing just EPA/DHA content of fish-oil with that what in average is available in fish, 6 g of EPA/DHA content of fish-oil correlates to EPA/DHA content of 1 pound of fish.

There is a study of Tansanian Bantu having the same genetic background. One group lived as fishermen and ate about 1 pound fish daily, the other inland without access to dietary fish. The inlanders had high Lp(a) (usually considered genetic and a strong risk factor for CVD), the fishermen lower Lp(a).

Cardiologist Dr. Davis William of the former 'TrackYourPlaque' forum on account of this study therefore tested the equal amount of EPA/DHA from fishoil in his patients with high Lp(a), and found in about 60% who tried 6g EPA/DHA daily for at least 2-3 years Lp(a) dropped significantly.

Therefore he still recommends 6 g/d of EPA/DHA content fishoil to his patients with high Lp(a).
For all other CVD patients 3 g/d of EPA/DHA only.
 
Messages
30
Likes
17
Yes, in fact without that test I am quite certain I would not be here today. It was the first test that pointed to issues with malabsorption, pancreas enzymes, along with many nutrient deficiencies, as well as neurotransmitter, mitochondrial, SIBO, and Candida overgrowth issues. It introduced me to the Krebs cycle and biochemistry. This was years into my decline, and after 4 doctors had specifically told me my pancreas was fine. It pointed me in the direction of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), pancreas damage, malabsorption, and made me delve into metabolic pathways and their impact, mitochondrial functioning, etc. in order to improve my quality of life.

It helped me dig out of the hole of ME/CFS. From bedridden with no hope in sight to a functioning human again. It did take years, much research, experimentation, and many actions to turn the boat around, mainly cause none of my doctors were experienced with it. But, the FMV test was the first point of light for me.
So how did you heal yourself ? I know I have candida and leaky gut issues so that probably is reducing my absorption by a lot . When I took blood work I had depleted zinc ,copper and magnesium and iron was overloaded . So I know I have all these sorts of damage in my body from these nutrients . Im a complete mess I feel like I’m gonna be wheelchair bound very soon . I don’t feel like they get absorbed that well . I’ve been taking magnesium in high doses for around 2 years and the level is still the same . So I don’t think my body is accepting magnesium . How do you get the body to accept vitamins and minerals again ?
 

Crux

Senior Member
Messages
1,185
Likes
921
Location
USA
I would add choline or phosphatidylcholine and some citicoline to the list. It's been helping me and my liver. If the liver dysfunctions, then nothing seems to work.

I see you have iron overload, that can ruin every organ , especially the liver and brain. Copper enzymes can regulate iron metabolism. Copper supplementation has brought my elevated iron to excellent levels in the blood at least. It has taken over 2 1/2 years.

I wonder if I'd been more keen on keeping choline up, my liver would have been better at regulating iron. (ceruloplasmin production)

Other things have helped with lowering iron : green tea, apolactoferrin, and R-lipoic acid. ..eating eggs , calcium foods, etc.
 

Learner1

Administrator
Messages
3,819
Likes
6,845
Location
Pacific Northwest
Was there any specific intervention that you think created this large improvement? Would you say you are now moderate or mild?
This is not about a "specific intervention," there is no magic bullet here. What @BeADocToGoTo1 described was a lot of biochemical imbalances which is what I've experienced. The beauty of the NutrEval is it gives you the ability to figure out what different pathways are doing and figure out where bottlenecks are or ratios that are out of whack.

Then you can intelligently come up with a supplement plan. And it's not a one time fix, unfortunately. Needs change over time - you fix some bottlenecks and then new ones appear, or because of some other aspect of treatment, the need for nutrients changes.

I started doing NutrEvals before I got ME/CFS. My child had had a significant mental illness which was cure without meds after a naturopath found celiac, multiple food allergies, a messed up gut and severe nutrient deficiencies and imbalances after 9 psychiatric meds failed. It was a powerful lesson in what nutrients can do and the NutrEval was our Roadmap, helped by learning from Patrick Holford, a UK practitioner who wrote "The New Optimum Nutritiin for the Mind".

So, after learning I was celiac with a bunch of unhappy methylation SNPs, I began doing yearly NutrEvals. 8 years ago, my needs weren't so great, but after my cancer diagnosis and treatment and descent into ME/CFS, my needs increased dramatically. Before, I didn't blow through amino acids like I do now (and like Fluge and Mella found). I developed a peroxynitrite problem aa Mares and Morris and Pall have written about and huge oxidative stress. I need huge amounts of B6, used in sphingolipid production, a problem for ME/CFS patients, and need large amounts of B2 and B12 and selenium, zinc, copper, and manganese which researchers like Naviaux and Davis have found.

Tackling these issues with a targeted supplement program thoughtfully designed to address these issues, then retesting every 8-12 months and tweaking the protocol, along with the infection, immune, MCAS and POTS treatment have brought me from sleeping 16 hours a day and being totally brain fogged in early 2016 to where I sleep normally, work half time and exercise carefully (I still can't do anything intense or aerobic) and am clear headed and can think.

Or from about 40% of normal to 80-85% of normal. It has taken a huge amount of effort with good help, but it has helped. The clinicians at Emerge Australia echoed much of this, sauing we are all individuals and need to be treated witb individual protocols.

Sure would be easier to just have supplement X be the intervention that fixed all of us, but it's just not that simple.

So how did you heal yourself ? I know I have candida and leaky gut issues so that probably is reducing my absorption by a lot . When I took blood work I had depleted zinc ,copper and magnesium and iron was overloaded . So I know I have all these sorts of damage in my body from these nutrients . Im a complete mess I feel like I’m gonna be wheelchair bound very soon . I don’t feel like they get absorbed that well . I’ve been taking magnesium in high doses for around 2 years and the level is still the same . So I don’t think my body is accepting magnesium . How do you get the body to accept vitamins and minerals again ?
There are different ways of getting nutrients into your bloodstream if you're having problems digesting them.

Obviously, helping your digestion with acid supplementation for your stomach, enzymes to help digest, glutamine to repair a damaged gut barrier can help. "The Food Intolerance Bible" is a great self-help book or a functional medicine doctor can help.

But, you can try sublingual or topical preparations, or intramusculsr injections or IV nutrients.
Therefore he still recommends 6 g/d of EPA/DHA content fishoil to his patients with high Lp(a).
For all other CVD patients 3 g/d of EPA/DHA only.
This is only if you need EPA/DHA. They are definitely important if you need then as they are a couple of lipids needed for healthy membranes, but the lipids need to be in a goid ratio. Too much is detrimental - mine are always high on tests, but I do eat salmon.

A NutrEval (or a very specialized lipid panel from Kennedy Krieger Institute van tell you what lipids you need and help yoi knkw what you need to get the right ratios of cell membrane constituents.
I would add choline or phosphatidylcholine and some citicoline to the list. It's been helping me and my liver. If the liver dysfunctions, then nothing seems to work.
Phospholipids are also needed for mitochondrial membranes. Researcher Garth Nicolson has done a lot of work with chronic fatigue and GWI patients and developed a formula, NT Factor, which contains tge 6 phospholipids needed for mitochondrial membranes in the correct ratios. Patricia Kane has interrsting things to say about lipids, particularly the danger of too many omega-3s and the need for phosphatixyl choline.
I see you have iron overload, that can ruin every organ , especially the liver and brain. Copper enzymes can regulate iron metabolism. Copper supplementation has brought my elevated iron to excellent levels in the blood at least. It has taken over 2 1/2 years.

I wonder if I'd been more keen on keeping choline up, my liver would have been better at regulating iron. (ceruloplasmin production)

Other things have helped with lowering iron : green tea, apolactoferrin, and R-lipoic acid. ..eating eggs , calcium foods, etc.
If one hss iron overload, it is important to know why. Even conventional doctors know to do a test to see if you have HFE gene SNPs and to monitor serim ferritin and do an iron panel (TIBC, UIBC, iron saturation and serum iron).

If you're heterozygous or have a more minor SNP, perhaps you can supplement your way out of it, but I highly doubt even that. I am heterozygous for 2 SNPs, C282Y and H63D, and there are 2 ways to get rid of it so it doesn't damage organs, chelate it, which is uncommon, or doing phlebotomies (giving blood) every 3 weeks to start and every 3 months afterward. The Iron Disorders Institute has good info on their website.

When I first learned about it, the hematologist emphasized that it could be causing my fatigue. What I think was happening was the iron was causing hydroxyl radicals to form in my mitochondria and Fenton reactions which helped to damage my mitochondria. Removing the excess iron and taking NT Factor and phosphatidyl choline have helped me greatly in the past few months, on top of the other things I was doing, like working on shutting down peroxynitrite production and supplementing the B vitamins, anti oxidants and aminos the NutrEval said I needed.

It's about like putting together a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle, I know, but persistently following the clues has given me a lot more progress than if I tried chasing after the hot new supplement of the day that works for some other patient. It's got to be individualized - we may use the same toolbox but the tools and amounts will be different for everyone.
 

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
324
Likes
581
Hi Snowx997

There are two categories that may be of interest to you as I do not see them in your list; phytonutrients and amino acids. Amino acids in particular helped me enormously. I dedicated a chapter on supplements that helped in my case and broke it out into the following categories:

Macronutrients: Calories for energy through carbohydrates, proteins, fats.
Micronutrients: Vitamins, minerals, trace elements.
Phytonutrients: Plant based chemicals such as carotenoids or flavonoids.
Fatty Acids:Essential omega-3, -6, and nonessential omega-9.
Amino Acids: Essential and nonessential building blocks of protein.

On mitochondrial support, in addition to the ones you mentioned, here are a few others that were not on your list that I used temporarily, and some I still use :

● Creatine, d-ribose, MitoThera (Prothera) and ATP Fuel (Researched Nutritionals), Phophaline Phosphatidylcholine (Xymogen), ResveraCel (Thorne Research)

A side note on copper and zinc levels as the ratio of the two in the blood is important to know. Molybdenum is an interesting one and perhaps one to test for as it helps detoxify byproducts of bacterial or candida yeast overgrowths, and is used in the transsulfuration metabolic pathway. I was deficient in molybdenum due to SIBO and candida overgrowth.
 
Last edited:

Crux

Senior Member
Messages
1,185
Likes
921
Location
USA
If one hss iron overload, it is important to know why. Even conventional doctors know to do a test to see if you have HFE gene SNPs and to monitor serim ferritin and do an iron panel (TIBC, UIBC, iron saturation and serum iron).
I agreee, but there are many more iron loading genes that haven't been explored. Hematologists are quick to dismiss patients with iron overload who do not have the classic forms.

One problem with the iron panel is that it only indicates iron in the blood, but not organs. Someone can have what looks to be iron deficiency, but have iron deposition in the liver, brain, and other organs.

I've read the anecdotes of many hemochromatosis (HH) patients who still have fatigue and other symptoms that may be remedied by further testing and treatments.

Even though phlebotomy has helped to reduce some of the symptoms in HH patients , it doesn't seem to reduce brain iron overload, and many HH patients don't seem to have brain iron overload.

I'm just saying that there's so much more to iron metabolism than an iron panel reveals.
 

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
324
Likes
581
Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is another category to consider that I separate out as a prescription. But there are over the counter supplement versions available that you can experiment with. Dipan-9 (Thorne) or Enhanced Super Digestive Enzymes (Life Extension) come to mind. They are to be taken with each meal or snack, or beverage that has calories, in order to help break down food into usable nutrients.

As you get older the pancreas is less able to produce enzymes, and so it can be a slow decline in absorption. If you have any additional pancreas damage (which can have many reasons including infection, inflammation, auto immune, diabetes, alcohol, smoking, bacterial, viral, etc.) you can end up with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI).

It does not hurt to try them!

But it might be an area to have some tests done.
 
Messages
30
Likes
17
This is not about a "specific intervention," there is no magic bullet here. What @BeADocToGoTo1 described was a lot of biochemical imbalances which is what I've experienced. The beauty of the NutrEval is it gives you the ability to figure out what different pathways are doing and figure out where bottlenecks are or ratios that are out of whack.

Then you can intelligently come up with a supplement plan. And it's not a one time fix, unfortunately. Needs change over time - you fix some bottlenecks and then new ones appear, or because of some other aspect of treatment, the need for nutrients changes.

I started doing NutrEvals before I got ME/CFS. My child had had a significant mental illness which was cure without meds after a naturopath found celiac, multiple food allergies, a messed up gut and severe nutrient deficiencies and imbalances after 9 psychiatric meds failed. It was a powerful lesson in what nutrients can do and the NutrEval was our Roadmap, helped by learning from Patrick Holford, a UK practitioner who wrote "The New Optimum Nutritiin for the Mind".

So, after learning I was celiac with a bunch of unhappy methylation SNPs, I began doing yearly NutrEvals. 8 years ago, my needs weren't so great, but after my cancer diagnosis and treatment and descent into ME/CFS, my needs increased dramatically. Before, I didn't blow through amino acids like I do now (and like Fluge and Mella found). I developed a peroxynitrite problem aa Mares and Morris and Pall have written about and huge oxidative stress. I need huge amounts of B6, used in sphingolipid production, a problem for ME/CFS patients, and need large amounts of B2 and B12 and selenium, zinc, copper, and manganese which researchers like Naviaux and Davis have found.

Tackling these issues with a targeted supplement program thoughtfully designed to address these issues, then retesting every 8-12 months and tweaking the protocol, along with the infection, immune, MCAS and POTS treatment have brought me from sleeping 16 hours a day and being totally brain fogged in early 2016 to where I sleep normally, work half time and exercise carefully (I still can't do anything intense or aerobic) and am clear headed and can think.

Or from about 40% of normal to 80-85% of normal. It has taken a huge amount of effort with good help, but it has helped. The clinicians at Emerge Australia echoed much of this, sauing we are all individuals and need to be treated witb individual protocols.

Sure would be easier to just have supplement X be the intervention that fixed all of us, but it's just not that simple.


There are different ways of getting nutrients into your bloodstream if you're having problems digesting them.

Obviously, helping your digestion with acid supplementation for your stomach, enzymes to help digest, glutamine to repair a damaged gut barrier can help. "The Food Intolerance Bible" is a great self-help book or a functional medicine doctor can help.

But, you can try sublingual or topical preparations, or intramusculsr injections or IV nutrients.

This is only if you need EPA/DHA. They are definitely important if you need then as they are a couple of lipids needed for healthy membranes, but the lipids need to be in a goid ratio. Too much is detrimental - mine are always high on tests, but I do eat salmon.

A NutrEval (or a very specialized lipid panel from Kennedy Krieger Institute van tell you what lipids you need and help yoi knkw what you need to get the right ratios of cell membrane constituents.

Phospholipids are also needed for mitochondrial membranes. Researcher Garth Nicolson has done a lot of work with chronic fatigue and GWI patients and developed a formula, NT Factor, which contains tge 6 phospholipids needed for mitochondrial membranes in the correct ratios. Patricia Kane has interrsting things to say about lipids, particularly the danger of too many omega-3s and the need for phosphatixyl choline.

If one hss iron overload, it is important to know why. Even conventional doctors know to do a test to see if you have HFE gene SNPs and to monitor serim ferritin and do an iron panel (TIBC, UIBC, iron saturation and serum iron).

If you're heterozygous or have a more minor SNP, perhaps you can supplement your way out of it, but I highly doubt even that. I am heterozygous for 2 SNPs, C282Y and H63D, and there are 2 ways to get rid of it so it doesn't damage organs, chelate it, which is uncommon, or doing phlebotomies (giving blood) every 3 weeks to start and every 3 months afterward. The Iron Disorders Institute has good info on their website.

When I first learned about it, the hematologist emphasized that it could be causing my fatigue. What I think was happening was the iron was causing hydroxyl radicals to form in my mitochondria and Fenton reactions which helped to damage my mitochondria. Removing the excess iron and taking NT Factor and phosphatidyl choline have helped me greatly in the past few months, on top of the other things I was doing, like working on shutting down peroxynitrite production and supplementing the B vitamins, anti oxidants and aminos the NutrEval said I needed.

It's about like putting together a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle, I know, but persistently following the clues has given me a lot more progress than if I tried chasing after the hot new supplement of the day that works for some other patient. It's got to be individualized - we may use the same toolbox but the tools and amounts will be different for everyone.
What doses do you take for zinc copper manganese b2 and selenium . I think I had low b2 as well as one variant of the mthfr mutation . But my folate and b12 were in range . Just the b2 was on the low end of range.
 
Messages
30
Likes
17
Hi Snowx997

There are two categories that may be of interest to you as I do not see them in your list; phytonutrients and amino acids. Amino acids in particular helped me enormously. I dedicated a chapter on supplements that helped in my case and broke it out into the following categories:

Macronutrients: Calories for energy through carbohydrates, proteins, fats.
Micronutrients: Vitamins, minerals, trace elements.
Phytonutrients: Plant based chemicals such as carotenoids or flavonoids.
Fatty Acids:Essential omega-3, -6, and nonessential omega-9.
Amino Acids: Essential and nonessential building blocks of protein.

On mitochondrial support, in addition to the ones you mentioned, here are a few others that were not on your list that I used temporarily, and some I still use :

● Creatine, d-ribose, MitoThera (Prothera) and ATP Fuel (Researched Nutritionals), Phophaline Phosphatidylcholine (Xymogen), ResveraCel (Thorne Research)

A side note on copper and zinc levels as the ratio of the two in the blood is important to know. Molybdenum is an interesting one and perhaps one to test for as it helps detoxify byproducts of bacterial or candida yeast overgrowths, and is used in the transsulfuration metabolic pathway. I was deficient in molybdenum due to SIBO and candida overgrowth.
I also take the moly , boron and biotin to help control /reduce candida overgrowth but I’m told moly is not good to take long term ? How much moly would u recommend taking daily .
 
Messages
30
Likes
17
I also take the moly , boron and biotin to help control /reduce candida overgrowth but I’m told moly is not good to take long term ? How much moly would u recommend taking daily .
Creatine 5g+ per day helps me a lot But it’s tough on the kidneys and dehydrates the crap outta me . I need several gallons of water when I take it .
 

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
324
Likes
581
Was there any specific intervention that you think created this large improvement? Would you say you are now moderate or mild?
So how did you heal yourself ? I know I have candida and leaky gut issues so that probably is reducing my absorption by a lot . When I took blood work I had depleted zinc ,copper and magnesium and iron was overloaded . So I know I have all these sorts of damage in my body from these nutrients . Im a complete mess I feel like I’m gonna be wheelchair bound very soon . I don’t feel like they get absorbed that well . I’ve been taking magnesium in high doses for around 2 years and the level is still the same . So I don’t think my body is accepting magnesium. How do you get the body to accept vitamins and minerals again ?
Let me start by saying that everyone's situation is going to different, and everyone's bodily requirements are going to vary, even over time. How you ended up here might have very different root causes than my situation, and how your body reacts to treatments can be completely different. My exposure to toxins, viruses, bacteria, or just plain luck of the draw with genetic make up might be very different to yours. There is no specific intervention that helped, but rather a combination of actions. Now, many actions to help rebalance the body are transferable and are at least something to try and look into as we are all bound by biochemistry. That is why I am sharing my experiences here, in the hope that it can light some bulbs for others. So in very rough terms, these are some of areas I tackled:

1. Removing any bodily insults I had control over in order to lower oxidative stress, inflammation, and the toxic load strain to the body. Help the body rebalance and heal is the goal. This includes things like air quality in the house (e.g. particles, mold, fumes and chemicals), water quality both for drinking and bathing (living in the US this was a shocker), food quality, chemicals in the house and on the skin, pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics through food (e.g. glyphosate is an antimicrobial), plastics exposure in the house through e.g. cooking wares, waterboilers, storage containers. Of course, alcohol, smoking and hard drugs are a no brainer. But I even did some more controversial ones like check the house for large EMF fields and I sleep with the A/C breaker turned off in the bedroom.

2. Analyzing and correcting nutrient deficiencies.

3. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (PERT) to be able break down food into useable nutrients.

4. Medical testing for pancreatic damage and any related downstream health effects.

5. Strict food and water intake quality analysis and adherence. Immensely important step! Many elements were completely surprising to me during my research and recovery, as I always thought I ate and lived healthily. Restaurant food when you are this ill is better to be avoided due to the ingredients used.

6. Supplementation to resolve deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, amino acids and fatty acids.

7. Tackling microbiome dysbiosis through medical testing, food, water, medicine and supplements.

8. Testing and re-balancing Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and Candida yeast overgrowth. Both of these also hinder nutrient absorption and production, impact auto immune reactions, increase food sensitivities, and increase the toxic load on the body.

9. Silent or acid reflux resolution, as this is a big signal from your body on food and water quality intake, as well as microbiome dysbiosis. The potential for further damage impact and malabsorption is not trivial. This signal should not be ignored nor constantly suppressed by the common antacids and PPIs.

10. Rebalancing neurotransmitters through nutrient support, food and water quality. Much of it can be caused by nutrient deficiencies and microbiome dysbiosis, but there is also a mental element of being chronically ill that needs addressing, both of which can get you into a vicious cycle.

11. Other primal healing elements to help support the body in its healing process, for example, meditation, sauna, mineral baths, sleep hygiene, etc.
 
Last edited: