Blood Test Used to Identify Autism Shows High Statistical Success in Second Study

Wally

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180619122434.htm
Success of blood test for autism affirmed
First physiological test for autism proves high accuracy in second trial
Date:
June 19, 2018
Source:
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Summary:
One year after researchers published their work on a physiological test for autism, a follow-up study confirms its exceptional success in assessing whether a child is on the autism spectrum.

The initial success in 2017 analyzed data from a group of 149 people, about half of whom had been previously diagnosed with ASD. For each member of the group, Hahn obtained data on 24 metabolites related to the two cellular pathways -- the methionine cycle and the transsulfuration pathway. Deliberately omitting data from one individual in the group, Hahn subjected the remaining dataset to advanced analysis techniques and used results to generate a predictive algorithm. The algorithm then made a prediction about the data from the omitted individual. Hahn cross-validated the results, swapping a different individual out of the group and repeating the process for all 149 participants. His method correctly identified 96.1 percent of all typically developing participants and 97.6 percent of the ASD cohort. ...

The new study applies Hahn's approach to an independent dataset....To avoid the lengthy process of gathering new data through clinical trials, Hahn and his team searched for existing datasets that included the metabolites he had analyzed in the original study. ...The data included only 22 of the 24 metabolites he used to create the original predictive algorithm, however Hahn determined the available information would be sufficient for the test. ...

The algorithm was then applied to the new group of 154 children for testing purposes. When the predictive algorithm was applied to each individual, it correctly predicted autism with 88 percent accuracy. ...

Hahn said the difference between the original accuracy rate and that of the new study can likely be attributed to several factors, the most important being that two of the metabolites were unavailable in the second dataset. Each of the two metabolites had been strong indicators in the previous study.
 

Wally

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Linked below is a 2017 study of ME/CFS patients blood samples to look at their metabolite profile. The researchers state that they believe the criteria used in this study would fall within the criteria for “SEID” as discussed in the 2015 IOM Report re ME/CFS (Note this IOM report does not appear to have ever been formally adopted by the U.S. Givernment - Dept. of HHS).

I have not gone through the study to see the details it may provide about the metabolites identified in these ME/CFS patients. Perhaps others may be interested looking at this paper in more detail and cross referencing it with the Autism studies noted above. I would be very interested to see the comparison of the metabolites identified in these studies/illnesses.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365380/#!po=1.72414
 

Learner1

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As the first paper said, they lookrd at the one carbon metabolism and transsulfuration pathway, looking at these biochemicals:

Methionine
SAM
SAH
SAM/SAH
Adenosine
Homocysteine
Cysteine
Glu-Cys
Cys-Gly
tGSH
fGSH
GSSG
fGSH/GSSG
tGSH/GSSG
Chlorotyrosine
Nitrotyrosine
Tyrosine
Tryptophane
fCystine
fCysteine
fCystine/fCysteine

The second paper identified issues with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, so not much of an overlap.

However, other ME/CFS researchers have found nitrosative and oxidative stress in M3/CFS, so homocysteine, GSH/GSSG, nitrotyrosine, SAMe, and methionine are likely related in some way.
 

Wally

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I imagine that Ron Davis, Naviaux and group have probably already studied any data that is available on the metabolite profiles of these two illneses (and perhaps other illnesses like MS). Just trying to find out if anyone knows where comparisons like those may have already been published in another study, article or even discussed in an interview or lecture.
 

wastwater

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I saw a study on autism saying that those with autism were better at detecting if something was in a straight line or slightly off to the left or right
An example might be if a picture is hanging dead straight
I wonder if pwme have this same ability
Might be worth testing
It suggests the brain is functioning in a different way taking longer to process but doing so more accurately
 
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