Best anticoagulants to avoid stomach ulcers?

ChookityPop

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Best In terms of effect and safety profile especially stomach ulcers.

I have read that 1/4 Aspirin should not be an Issue longterm.
 
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Shanti1

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As mentioned above, warfarin has been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for decades, but it has several drawbacks, it is inherently finicky and dose adjustments are needed frequently, especially when first starting. It will also decrease in effectiveness if you ingest vitamin K, so most patients are told to avoid dark leafy greens, broccoli, and various other vegetables. Warfarin is linked to bone loss and blood vessel calcification, likely because of the induced vitamin K deficiency.

Newer anti-coagulant medications on the market called direct thrombin inhibitors (ex. Dabigatran) are not impacted by vitamin K intake and tend to provide more stable blood-thinning effects, so there may be an advantage there, esp because the don't make you vit K deficient.

Neither one impacts stomach ulcers except increasing bleed risk by thinning the blood.

On the antiplatelet side, aspirin and other NSAIDs are associated with ulcers. Same with the prescription Plavix.

Omega-3 EPA/DHA in high doses, nattokinase, and pycnogenol would be my vote for best natural options.
 

ChookityPop

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ChookityPop

Senior Member
Messages
481
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592
As mentioned above, warfarin has been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for decades, but it has several drawbacks, it is inherently finicky and dose adjustments are needed frequently, especially when first starting. It will also decrease in effectiveness if you ingest vitamin K, so most patients are told to avoid dark leafy greens, broccoli, and various other vegetables. Warfarin is linked to bone loss and blood vessel calcification, likely because of the induced vitamin K deficiency.

Newer anti-coagulant medications on the market called direct thrombin inhibitors (ex. Dabigatran) are not impacted by vitamin K intake and tend to provide more stable blood-thinning effects, so there may be an advantage there, esp because the don't make you vit K deficient.

Neither one impacts stomach ulcers except increasing bleed risk by thinning the blood.

On the antiplatelet side, aspirin and other NSAIDs are associated with ulcers. Same with the prescription Plavix.

Omega-3 EPA/DHA in high doses, nattokinase, and pycnogenol would be my vote for best natural options.
Thanks for the insight!

Very interesting. How high doses of omega-3 EPA/DHA are we talking? Im buying omega 3 and nattokinase tomorrow and asking my doctor to try an anticoagulant on my next appointment.
 
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Shanti1

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Very interesting. How high doses of omega-3 EPA/DHA are we talking? Im buying omega 3 and nattokinase tomorrow and asking my doctor to try an anticoagulant on my next appointment.
Somewhere around 4500mg EPA and 3500 DHA, but you would want to work up to it to make sure it sits well with you.

If you are going to take an anticoagulant, you wouldn't want to take such high doses, maybe just 1-2g total, if any, so you have some antiplatelet support as well as anticoagulant support. But as @andyguitar points out, you would want to let your doc know. The PT/PTT test, which is the standard test for measuring how thin the blood is and monitoring warfarin therapy, only picks up the thinning influence of the coagulation portion of blood clotting, so if you are also taking something that influences platelet aggregation, your blood may be thinner than reflected on that test.

Similarly, taking nattokinase with anticoagulant meds can also lead to blood that is too thin.

If you are thinking about low dose anticoagulant therapy instead of the doses used for thrombosis, you may have to go with warfarin. Not sure if there newer drugs come in a low dose option.
 
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ChookityPop

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Somewhere around 4500mg EPA and 3500 DHA, but you would want to work up to it to make sure it sits well with you.

If you are going to take an anticoagulant, you wouldn't want to take such high doses, maybe just 1-2g total, if any, so you have some antiplatelet support as well as anticoagulant support. But as @andyguitar points out, you would want to let your doc know. The PT/PTT test, which is the standard test for measuring how thin the blood is and monitoring warfarin therapy, only picks up the thinning influence of the coagulation portion of blood clotting, so if you are also taking something that influences platelet aggregation, your blood may be thinner than reflected on that test.

Similarly, taking nattokinase with anticoagulant meds can also lead to blood that is too thin.

If you are thinking about low dose anticoagulant therapy instead of the doses used for thrombosis, you may have to go with warfarin. Not sure if there newer drugs come in a low dose option.
How important is the HPA DHA ratio? Im looking at regular liquid fish oil where I live and it contains a little more DHA than HPA. Which supplement are people usually taking? The ones I have found I would have to take 10-20 pills. It would be perfect if I just could take a few tbsp of liquid omega 3 fish oil.

I will talk to my doctor before starting. I dont know if he would give me anticoagulants off label. Though I do have positive APS autoantibodies. I would prefer the natural way/the least side effects route.
 
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Antocoagulants don't give stomach ulcers. Aspirin is a platelet aggregation inhibitor and an anti-inflammatory medication. The risk of aspirin depends on the dose. At low dose aspirin is safe.
Warfarin is dangerous and a pain to monitor.
If you want to prevent arterial thrombosis aspirin is safe and has shown efficacy.