BBC News today

ruben

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Did anyone see this item on BBC News today. A woman caught covid. As the weeks went by she said her breathing hadn't returned to normal. She complained about this and was sent for a scan. Scan results were "normal". She continued to complain about this. Apparently then along came a more advanced scanning machine. These revealed something was amiss after all. The woman made the point how demoralizing it had all been, that although she knew something wasn't right, how stubborn the medical people had been insisting they were right and she was wrong. All sounds very familiar.
 

Learner1

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Did anyone see this item on BBC News today. A woman caught covid. As the weeks went by she said her breathing hadn't returned to normal. She complained about this and was sent for a scan. Scan results were "normal". She continued to complain about this. Apparently then along came a more advanced scanning machine. These revealed something was amiss after all. The woman made the point how demoralizing it had all been, that although she knew something wasn't right, how stubborn the medical people had been insisting they were right and she was wrong. All sounds very familiar.
Perhaps she had autoimmune issues like do many of us.
 

Shanti1

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Yes, here is the BBC write up: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-60154398 and the pre-print study: https://oxfordbrc.nihr.ac.uk/preprint_explain_study/.

Basically, when they did MRI imaging with hyperpolarized Xenon gas, which behaves similarly to oxygen, they were able to visualize that, in people with long-Covid and shortness of breath, xenon gas was not moving from the lungs into the bloodstream. This indicates that oxygen exchange would be likewise affected and could explain the shortness of breath in long-Covid individuals with otherwise "normal' lungs on imaging and testing.