Article: NIH Features Dr. Davis' Nanoneedle Discovery in "Research Matters"

ljimbo423

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The team also optimized the assay for potential diagnostic use by comparing immune cells taken from blood plasma, whole blood, and serum. Plasma samples tested within five hours of collection yielded the most reliable results.


We don’t know exactly why the cells and plasma are acting this way, or even what they’re doing,” Davis says. “But there is scientific evidence that this disease is not a fabrication of a patient’s mind. We clearly see a difference in the way healthy and chronic fatigue syndrome immune cells process stress.”
The researchers looked at peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), a type of immune cell that is easy to isolate from blood samples. They compared PBMCs from 20 people with ME/CFS and 20 healthy controls. They placed the cells in a high salt environment, which creates a type of stress that cells can usually fix using ATP.
Couldn't Fluge and Mellas' finding that inhibited Pyruvate Dehydrogenase was causing a switch to glycolosis in cells, causing a much lower production of ATP, explain the nanoneedle results?
 

roller

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is this the guy who wrote a nasty article, a couple of weeks ago ?
ryan prior
but perhaps i confuse it all...
 

used_to_race

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is this the guy who wrote a nasty article, a couple of weeks ago ?
ryan prior
but perhaps i confuse it all...
Ryan Prior is an ME/CFS patient himself who writes for CNN, a mainstream news network in the USA. As far as I can tell he doesn't have anything to do with this article, which has been written by Tianna Hicklin, a technical writer at the NIH.
 

roller

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oh... i read his name when i clicked on the link.
now, its gone.

anyway, i confused him with some writer in the crosshairs, recently.
 
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Good article: and they did not mention all the private dollars that were required to actually pull off the study.

It seems like a sentence on the private funding: could have been included in a neutral sentence. That then would have suggested to somebody reading the article: that getting more private funding could be a good thing. Missed opportunity, I guess.
 

Gemini

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It seems like a sentence on the private funding: could have been included in a neutral sentence.
@Rufous McKinney good suggestion esp. given the critical role private funding played.

NIH does acknowledge Open Medicine Foundation funding along with theirs at the end of the article(see below):

Funding: NIH’s National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Open Medicine Foundation.