Anybody tried compressing their head with a weight (reverse of neck traction)?

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So, as it seems neck traction can help some people who have CCI issues. Because I do not have the equipment to do it myself, I tried the opposite, i.e. pushing down the head towards the spine. Logically, by doing this, if someone suffers from vertical CCI it should make symptoms worse.

What I did was, gradually build up to 10 kg resting on the top of my head for 90 seconds. Surprisingly, 10 kg @ 90 seconds seemed to make my symptoms worse. My dizziness became worse and I became more fatigued. However I am not sure if this was placebo. That's why I need to try it a few times more.

Has anyone else tried this?

Disclaimer: I do not recommend anyone to do this, as there is risk involved. If you do decide to do it, do it very gradually. Start with a light weight for a short duration and increase weight / duration in very small increments.
 

pattismith

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So, as it seems neck traction can help some people who have CCI issues. Because I do not have the equipment to do it myself, I tried the opposite, i.e. pushing down the head towards the spine. Logically, by doing this, if someone suffers from vertical CCI it should make symptoms worse.
I'm not sure to understand the purpose of this load test.

If you don't have any equipment, maybe you can try the natural traction (with the only weight of your head, which is about 6 kg).

You can sit and bend your body and your head forward between your legs. Gravity will do the traction, you just have to try to put your neck in a good position, close to the vertical, and to relax your neck muscles.

Cervical traction of 10% of body weight have shown to give improvement in case of neck spondylosis, so this method works in this case.

However, I don't think it will be enough for CCI, it seems that the traction needed is much much bigger, and the head position must be totally under control.

@jeff_w found some improvement with inversion table which is another natural traction way (he was not at 180 degre angle thought) but I don't feel comfortable with it, too much nausea and too much pressure on my mandibular area.
 

percyval577

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I suffered with very heavy legs, finally it has gotten so bad that I lack words.

Then by accident I discovered that low manganese is key for my mecfs.
After a few days I got the idea to stand on my head upside down (which I could/can do easily). There was no effect.

But then I hang myself upside down, and now very surprisingly (to me), relief was given to my legs, very clearly for some minutes and also a quite bit for longer time. So I continued this for half an year until it became unimportant.
But other symptoms didn´t become affected. Why?

I guess now that in the brain the feet are decoded on the top, and standing on the head might not allow the blood to especially get there, because there is preasure. But hangin upside down, it would, because there is no preasure.

Don´t know if this can be related to your experience, probably it´s unimportant.


(The whole story carries on until now, but I am quite fine, few pain, good sleep, good breathing, only very slightly a strange leg issue.

Edit: I have shrunken for 4cm some years after the onset of my mecfs. When I was little affected since my early childhood I got morbus scheuermann to small degree.)
 
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I'm not sure to understand the purpose of this load test.

If you don't have any equipment, maybe you can try the natural traction (with the only weight of your head, which is about 6 kg).

You can sit and bend your body and your head forward between your legs. Gravity will do the traction, you just have to try to put your neck in a good position, close to the vertical, and to relax your neck muscles.

Cervical traction of 10% of body weight have shown to give improvement in case of neck spondylosis, so this method works in this case.

However, I don't think it will be enough for CCI, it seems that the traction needed is much much bigger, and the head position must be totally under control.

@jeff_w found some improvement with inversion table which is another natural traction way (he was not at 180 degre angle thought) but I don't feel comfortable with it, too much nausea and too much pressure on my mandibular area.
I did for diagnostic purposes. If the weight makes my symptoms worse it would be an indication that I might suffer from CCI and a surgery could help. I tried it again yesterday, but didnt notice a worsening of symptoms this time. I will probably have to try with a higher weight.
 

pattismith

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@borko2100
I am concerned that you could hurt yourself, and there may be no evidence that putting weight worsen cci.
Do you worsen when you do some flexion or extension or rotation, or any other neck movement?
 
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@borko2100
I am concerned that you could hurt yourself, and there may be no evidence that putting weight worsen cci.
Do you worsen when you do some flexion or extension or rotation, or any other neck movement?
Yes, it is possible to hurt yourself if you overdo it. If you are careful though it shouldn't be an issue. Putting weights on your head is quite common actually, in some cultures people ofsten use their head to carry heavy objects, such as baskets with food, etc.

No I dont have problems with extension or rotation.
 

Hip

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In the yoga headstand (sirsasana), the full weight of your body is supported by your head (and by your arms to a lesser extent). It's like having a 60 kg weight on your head. Prior to ME/CFS I used do this headstand regularly.
 

pattismith

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In the yoga headstand (sirsasana), the full weight of your body is supported by your head (and by your arms to a lesser extent). It's like having a 60 kg weight on your head. Prior to ME/CFS I used do this headstand regularly.
Yes of course, but practicing this yoga if you suspect some cervical instability may not be the best idea.
I used to practice yoga when I was ill, and did up and under position a lot, and now down the hill, I have big problems with my neck. I didn't feel instant worsening of my condition when I was practising it, but I think now I actually injured my neck more.
 
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Hip

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Yes of course, but practicing this yoga if you suspect some cervical instability may not be the best idea.
That's true, but I was pointing out that the head and neck can take a lot of downward force when that force is along the axis of the spine.