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Antibiotics may reduce the ability of immune cells to kill bacteria

hixxy

Senior Member
Messages
1,229
Location
Australia
Antibiotics normally act in concert with an organism's immune system to eliminate an infection. However, the drugs can have broad side effects, including eliminating "good" bacteria in the course of fighting off a pathogen. A new study led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MIT, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has shown that antibiotics can also reduce the ability of mouse immune cells to kill bacteria, and that changes to the biochemical environment directly elicited by treatment can protect the bacterial pathogen. The work was published today in Cell Host & Microbe.

Rest here: https://phys.org/news/2017-11-antibiotics-ability-immune-cells-bacteria.html
Original paper: http://www.cell.com/cell-host-microbe/abstract/S1931-3128(17)30455-9
 

Thinktank

Senior Member
Messages
1,640
Location
Europe
Again, it confirms that antibiotics should be reserved for infections only which cannot be cleared by the immune system and that need treatment.
Not for so called "overgrowth of certain bacteria" in the gut and other nonsensical treatments.
Also long-term antibiotic treatment for lyme disease is not proven to be benificial, most patients are still sick after years of taking the antibiotics. Perhaps it's the antibiotics keeping them sick...
 

pattismith

Senior Member
Messages
3,926
Again, it confirms that antibiotics should be reserved for infections only which cannot be cleared by the immune system and that need treatment.
Not for so called "overgrowth of certain bacteria" in the gut and other nonsensical treatments.
Also long-term antibiotic treatment for lyme disease is not proven to be benificial, most patients are still sick after years of taking the antibiotics. Perhaps it's the antibiotics keeping them sick...

We have intracellular bacterias that some people's immune system isn't able to get under control.
(chlamydophila pneumoniae, mycoplasma species, chlamydia trachomatis, chlamydia psittaci, yersinia enterolitica, helicobacter pilori...)
I know that the topic is controversial and that doctors treating these intracellular bacterial infections are facing many critics, but some patients benefit from it and I was one of them. (even if I got side effects from these antibiotics)

The problem is that no test is yet really able to predict who will benefit from it and who won't do.
 

frozenborderline

Senior Member
Messages
4,405
hmm i'm considering going on antibiotics to see if it works--cause of my illness was lyme (a positive test result and fever and bullseye--e.g. it was definitely lyme) and am looking for advice. didn't get a positive lyme test recently (only one band) but did test positive for mycoplasma. they want to do 3 months of oral antibiotics