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Antibiotic that spares good bacteria

hapl808

Senior Member
Messages
2,178
I thought that was interesting, but I'm also always skeptical of announcements that amount to, "New drug doesn't have the negative effects of the last drug, which we still don't fully understand, but can assure you this was doesn't do that."

The microbiome is still a bit of a mystery, so these announcements tend to be premature - but that's a necessary aspect of hype. More honest is, "New antibiotic has a different effect on one type of bacteria - fingers crossed that this is a good thing for humans."
 
Messages
72
I agree the gut biome is very important. Its better to have good bacteria there than no bacteria at all which seems strange at first but we have adapted to live with certain bacteria for so many generations that not having good bacteria worsens your health

There are supplements of good bacteria that you can take. Acidophilus is popular but a mix of bacteria might be better. Any time you get an anti biotic you need to eat something to help the gut. Yogurt, kefir and other fermented foods can also help
 

hapl808

Senior Member
Messages
2,178
There are supplements of good bacteria that you can take. Acidophilus is popular but a mix of bacteria might be better. Any time you get an anti biotic you need to eat something to help the gut. Yogurt, kefir and other fermented foods can also help

Agree it's very important - just wish there were more research on it. Probiotics help some, but do nothing or even make others work. The 'promise' of precision microbiome medicine has been out there for a bit, but with very sporadic success like Ken's CFS Remission site.

We don't really understand why FMT does or doesn't work on some people, or whether the gut is upstream or downstream of some of these illnesses, or how it gets dysregulated, or why probiotics don't usually make persistent changes (but sometimes do), or why antibiotics sometimes have long term effects and sometimes don't, etc.
 
Messages
72
Yes and another good thing to take is lots of fiber and resistant starch in your diet. This helps feed the good bacteria in the gut. Too much sugar and carbs feed bad bacteria
 

Wishful

Senior Member
Messages
5,811
Location
Alberta
We don't really understand why FMT does or doesn't work on some people,
I think of it as agriculture: wheat grows well in some places, while millet is a better choice in others. My gut environment is not the same any someone else's, so what works for me won't necessarily be optimum for them.

I wonder whether tailored phages would be a better solution than chemicals.
 

Hip

Senior Member
Messages
17,956
Very interesting. The antibiotic in question is lolamicin.

I've been on the lookout for an antibiotic which can selectively kill gram-negative bacteria, but does not harm gram-positive bacteria.

Lolamicin appears to do just that.

Selective targeting of gram negatives could be beneficial for health, as most of the clinically harmful bacteria are gram-negative, whereas most probiotics are gram positive.

Harmful gram negatives include: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Helicobacter pylori, Enterobacter cloacae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Serratia marcescens, Moraxella catarrhalis, Legionella pneumophila.

There are a few harmful gram positive bacteria, such as: Staphylococcus and Streptococcus.

Beneficial gut bacteria like Bacteroides are gram negatives.



Streptomycin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics kill gram negatives but not gram positives; unfortunately these aminoglycoside antibiotics can cause permanent ear and hearing damage (ototoxic), so they are only used as a last resort.

Aztreonam is another antibiotic which selectively targets gram negatives. This is normally given by intravenous injection, as it is not orally absorbed. But I wonder if taken orally, would it then target the gut microbiome. Aztreonam is usually well-tolerated.
 
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