Altered muscle membrane potential and redox status differentiates two subgroups of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (Jammes et al, 2020)

Consul

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Altered muscle membrane potential and redox status differentiates two subgroups of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome
Jammes et al 2020


Abstract

Background
In myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), altered membrane excitability often occurs in exercising muscles demonstrating muscle dysfunction regardless of any psychiatric disorder. Increased oxidative stress is also present in many ME/CFS patients and could affect the membrane excitability of resting muscles.

Methods
Seventy-two patients were examined at rest, during an incremental cycling exercise and during a 10-min post-exercise recovery period. All patients had at least four criteria leading to a diagnosis of ME/CFS. To explore muscle membrane excitability, M-waves were recorded during exercise (rectus femoris (RF) muscle) and at rest (flexor digitorum longus (FDL) muscle). Two plasma markers of oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and oxidation–reduction potential (ORP)) were measured. Plasma potassium (K+) concentration was also measured at rest and at the end of exercise to explore K+ outflow.

Results
Thirty-nine patients had marked M-wave alterations in both the RF and FDL muscles during and after exercise while the resting values of plasma TBARS and ORP were increased and exercise-induced K+ outflow was decreased. In contrast, 33 other patients with a diagnosis of ME/CFS had no M-wave alterations and had lower baseline levels of TBARS and ORP. M-wave changes were inversely proportional to TBARS and ORP levels.

Conclusions
Resting muscles of ME/CFS patients have altered muscle membrane excitability. However, our data reveal heterogeneity in some major biomarkers in ME/CFS patients. Measurement of ORP may help to improve the diagnosis of ME/CFS.

The study: https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-020-02341-9
 

Wishful

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They said "regardless of any psychiatric disorder", but that doesn't rule out neurological disorders. Is it possible for neurological disorders to alter membrane excitability in muscles? I couldn't find a simple answer to that, but it seems at least possible, through hormones, other chemokines, or maybe through nerve signal processing and feedback (making muscle cells work inefficiently, or fight each other).
 
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Results
Thirty-nine patients had marked M-wave alterations in both the RF and FDL muscles during and after exercise while the resting values of plasma TBARS and ORP were increased
So increased oxidative stress during exercise. Not a surprise but good to have more results confirming it and also research localised to other cell types than the mostly inactive white blood cells used by omf