Severe ME Day of Understanding and Remembrance: Aug. 8, 2017
Determined to paper the Internet with articles about ME, Jody Smith brings some additional focus to Severe Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Day of Understanding and Remembrance on Aug. 8, 2017 ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Pesticide activated de-iodinase type 3 enzymes (DIO3) and produce reverse Triiodothyronine (rT3)

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by pattismith, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes:
    2,140
    Pesticide activated de-iodinase type 3 enzymes (DIO3) and produce reverse Triiodothyronine (rT3).
    2017

    Reverse T3 influences uptake of cellular thyroid hormone.

    The study aimed to describe the pesticide exposure and level of rT3 in school children.

    Method
    :

    Subjects were 84 school children who lived in agriculture area in Brebes District, Indonesia.

    The study used cross-sectional design.

    Pesticide metabolites in urine were measured by HPLC with Triple Quadrupole Tandem Mass Spectrometry detector. Serum samples were examined by ELISA method for rT3 detection.

    Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). Results: In 51.2% out of 84 subjects, three of six types of dialkyl phosphate metabolite were detected in urine.

    The type of pesticide metabolites were diethylthiophospate (35.7%), dimethylthiophospate (28.6%), and dimethyldithiophosphate (8.3%).

    The mean levels of diethylthiophospate were 0.01±0.019 ppm (0.001–0.1 ppm), of dimethylthiophospate 0.015±0.034 ppm (0.001–0.14 ppm), and of dimethyldithiophosphate 0.042±0.013 ppm (0.026–0.064 ppm).

    The mean level of rT3 was 323.21±193.78 pg/ml
    (97.22–864.56 pg/ml).

    All subjects had rT3 above the normal level (25–75 pg/ml).

    There was a significance different between the mean level of rT3 among school children who were exposed and non exposed to pesticide (p < 0.001).


    Conclusion
    :

    Pesticides exposures are thought to increase the activity of DIO3 and have an impact on increasing the levels of rT3 level in school children in the agriculture area.

    All subjects may indicate cellular hypothyroidism and needs to be confirmed by assessed free T3/reverse T3 ratio.
     
  2. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

    Messages:
    622
    Likes:
    926
    South east England
    Well done to @pattismith for turning this info up. Going a bit off topic, but there is to my mind some evidence that some of the symptoms of GWS might be a result of pesticides.
     
  3. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes:
    2,140
    I really would like to know the role of organophosphate toxicity in my illness.:thumbsup:

    Although I was already middly ill from the teenage, it dramatically worsened some years after I was repeatidly exposed to organophosphates from dog-sprays....

    Other PR members were exposed as well (@Hip )

    The problem is that I can't find studies about the effect of reverse T3 on the body...:thumbdown:
     
    Countrygirl, Abha and Hip like this.
  4. Learner1

    Learner1 Forum Support Assistant

    Messages:
    2,268
    Likes:
    3,880
    Pacific Northwest
    pattismith likes this.
  5. Lipac

    Lipac Senior Member

    Messages:
    160
    Likes:
    306
    michigan
    @pattismith I'm afraid you won't find rT3 studies.
    Some Medical Drs know it's real, studies show post cardiac surgery patients have a vastly improved survival rate given T3, as they have high rT3 after surgery ( as do burns, traumas, other major surgeries, sepsis etc).

    Still, it's not studied or acknowledged.

    I found out about mine at a CFS clinic when I was treated 12 years ago. I'd never heard of it.
    Dr Holtorff's clinics began within that chain of fatigue centers, and he's continuing to treat with T3.

    There's not even a name for it.
    Sometimes it's called " Euthyroid Sick Syndrome" or subclinical hypothyroidism, but those are slightly different than having either a dio3 enzyme disruption or possibly T3 hormone receptor problem.

    Elevated rT3 with low free T3 has the SAME result as untreated hypothyroidism. Too long to list here. Eventually fatal.

    My mom's GP refilled my t3 a year ago. My mother had surgery in September, is 80 and has ALL the symptoms of hypothyroidism. She's never bounced back. She's freezing and dragging.
    I have it.
    Her mother had it.
    Her GP won't test her.... He says " I don't believe in it ".

    How many people die of things because no one will study them, or they get deleted from medical books by insurance companies who buy the medical Publishing companies, or it'll take two generations before Drs " believe" in something?

    I read about the history of syphilis...
    It was KNOWN it led to severe debility, death and birth defects.
    Most people had simply been Locked in insane asylums if it progressed.

    Yet, for decades before and after the turn of the 20 the century, Drs didn't " believe" syphilis needed to be treated...
    Like Lyme, it just 'went away'.

    Any disease progression was called ' hysteria', even after seeing the spirochetes in blood, with microscopes. They kept putting people in asylums.

    Unbelievable.

    What's the line about Those Who Refuse To Learn From the Past are Destined to Repeat It?
     
    Abha, kelly8, andyguitar and 3 others like this.
  6. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes:
    2,140
    @Lipac , I agree so much, we need much more studies on hormon thyroid dysfunction, it is more complex than doctors previously thought.

    Deiodinases can be affected, but thyroid hormons transporters into cells as well, and also intracellular receptors for thyroid hormons (nuclear, mitochondrial, etc).
    There can be also TSH impairement from the hypothalamus-pituitary axis deficiency.

    None of this field is enough investigated.

    Studies about low T3 syndrome are limitated to critical illnesses most of the time, which is far from enough.

    (Only a few ones about chronical liver and kidney diseases, not enough)

    My illness is very close to my grand mother illness, who never had any diagnosis other then arthritis/depression...

    My mother has her doctor who put her under natural thyroid hormons while her thyroid panel is better than mine, so he believes that it plays a role in her symptoms as well.

    I hope the lack of studies will improve quickly...


    Thank you, I would be interested to read it, but I can't open it...
     
    BadBadBear and Countrygirl like this.
  7. Learner1

    Learner1 Forum Support Assistant

    Messages:
    2,268
    Likes:
    3,880
    Pacific Northwest
  8. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes:
    2,140
    Learner1 likes this.
  9. JeanneD

    JeanneD Senior Member

    Messages:
    130
    Likes:
    371
    Since when is science, or even medicine, a matter of belief? A medical condition isn't any less real because you don't "believe in it". Maybe if we don't believe in that GP he will disappear... poof... just like your mother's condition. One can hope.
     
  10. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

    Messages:
    622
    Likes:
    926
    South east England
    In the scientific community there is very little doubt that organophosphates can cause serious health problems. So far so good. The debate is about what the toxic dose is. As to their effects on human health..... I dont think that question will be answered in the near future. But if you consider the effect they are designed to have -on pests ect- they do act on the CNS to kill the pest and they will act on the human CNS. Just depends on the dose.
     
  11. Learner1

    Learner1 Forum Support Assistant

    Messages:
    2,268
    Likes:
    3,880
    Pacific Northwest
    The effects on human health seem to be well known. This is a pretty mainstream article:

    https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/167726-clinical#b1
     
    andyguitar likes this.
  12. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

    Messages:
    622
    Likes:
    926
    South east England
    Here's a thought to perk us all up a bit. As @Learner1 has pointed out, even what could be described as the "Mainstream" accepts that pesticides can cause health problems in humans. It has'nt always been like that, so the change demonstrates that scientific "fact" is not written in stone as some may believe.
     
    Learner1 likes this.
  13. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes:
    2,140
    @andyguitar , the spray I was using has been withdrawn around 2003 in Europe because of cancerigen toxicity...
     
  14. kelly8

    kelly8 Senior Member

    Messages:
    107
    Likes:
    201
    This may be a bit off topic but because this is related to pesticides maybe someone here would know.... i am able to work very part time at a grocery store. In the past i have spent a lot of time with the produce. (Handling it and the boxes ect.) We handle both organic and non organic. In the past i was handling it for hours a day.

    In 2012 i got a crazy rash and my whole body was itchy. No one could figure the rash out. My fatigue got worse and occasionally i would get hives. I was diagnosed with mast cell on top of my fatigue shortly after that. I know three other employees who work a lot with produce who are having some chronic health issues.

    I tried looking up info about this to see if i could pinpoint what was causing the issue but it doesn't exist anywhere. The study above looks along the same lines. Does anyone have more info about chronic exposure? I'm wondering if it is making my body worse but can't find what to even look for....
     
    andyguitar likes this.
  15. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

    Messages:
    622
    Likes:
    926
    South east England
    @kelly8 might want to consider if she or any other employees have been handling new types of produce that could cause an allergic reaction as it sounds like that is more likley than pesticides in my opinion. That said, without knowing what country she is from or what regulations they have re pesticides I would'nt rule them out.
     
  16. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes:
    2,140
    just received my rT3: 0.49 µg/l (normal 0.09-0.35) =
    Strangely, the normal ranges of Mayo is 10-24 ng/dL, which is equivallent to 0.1-0.24 pg/ml
    (or to 0.153 nmol/l -0.368 nmol/l)

    Maybe they made a mistake in the study?:cautious:
     
  17. kelly8

    kelly8 Senior Member

    Messages:
    107
    Likes:
    201
    We are in the us and there are a lot of produce skus that we handle daily. There is no way to single out one item that might be new as we have items coming into stock and out of stock every day based on availability.

    I have worked for this store for 8 years and when i was exclusively working in produce 10 hours a day i started getting really wierd rashes and hives. This was on top of all the fatigue and me type issues. There are other people who spend many hours a day working with it that get hives ect. But there is no way to single out one thing.

    And of course if the fda says it is safe there is no test i can find that checks to see if this is part of my issue. I went to multiple allergists and they didn't have a sample to test against for that stuff. I'm still in the thought that it would be pesticide exposure. How could 4 different people all working with produce at the same store be having an allergic reaction to one single piece of fruit? Especially if each sku becomes unavailable at least twice during the year because of growing season.

    The reactions are not going away during one part of the year. They are happening all year long. Unfortunately once it is deemed safe no one gets funding to study it as i can't seem to find any further info.

    Guess I'll just have to wear gloves and a gas mask to stock our fruit. :eek: I'll just explain its part of the mast cell stuff and they will be ok with it right?
     
    andyguitar and Countrygirl like this.
  18. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

    Messages:
    622
    Likes:
    926
    South east England
    This is going to be a tough one to crack. If this was happening to me in the UK I would ask our Environmental Health people to look at it. Do you have something like that in the US? You in a union?
     
  19. kelly8

    kelly8 Senior Member

    Messages:
    107
    Likes:
    201
    We are not in a union. I'm at a loss really as to why it keeps happening.
     
    andyguitar likes this.
  20. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

    Messages:
    622
    Likes:
    926
    South east England
    Hmm.... You might well discover that other workers in similar occupations to you are getting the same symptoms. If so then you might have discovered a health hazard that is not known to the FDA or EPA. I do remember something on TV about migrant fruit pickers in California (?) getting a range of health problems including birth defects. An association was made between their exposure to pesticides and those health problems. But that was more to do with crop spraying than handling the fruit. Would you be able to get a different job?
     
    kelly8 likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page