Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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New Study Re Aerolized Cyanobacteria As A Possible Risk for ALS

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Wally, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. Wally

    Wally Senior Member

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    The health risk of toxic cyanobacteria has primarily been researched in relation to the ingestion of water either by drinking or submersing in contaminated water or eating animals with the toxin found in their organs. Very little research has been done on the possible health risks from aerolized particles from toxic cyanobacteria. There have been a few other studies that have proposed the idea that cyanobacteria might be one of factors in developing ALS, Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, but no definitive findings have been made.

    This study provides additional data to show how toxic cyanobacteria may enter the body without requiring the bacteria to make contact with the body through drinking water, eating contaminated food or contact with skin on the outside of the body. These new findings may encourage further research to see if this environmental toxin in an aerolized form could have an impact on the development of ALS or other illnesses.

    http://n.neurology.org/content/90/15_Supplement/P4.449
    Note - title and text edited to correct where the word Alzheimer’s had been used instead of ALS.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
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  2. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    It's probably one of those brain fog moments: this study is about the connection between cyanobacteria and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), not Alzheimer's.

    Interestingly, in a case study, ALS was linked to enterovirus infection of the CNS. So this might make ALS similar to ME/CFS. So both ME/CFS and ALS are linked to cyanobacteria and enterovirus.
     
  3. Wally

    Wally Senior Member

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    @Hip - Thank you for letting me know of my error, I will edit the title and thread.

    Yes, it was definitively one of those sad cognitive moments. In my head I was typing ALS, but my fingers (and I guess a short circuit in my brain matter) had me type out Alzheimer’s. I even read the post over and over because it felt like I had spelled something wrong and I just could not see what it was, but I would always end up on the word “Alzheimer’s”. There have been previous studies about the hypothesis that toxic cyanobacteria from bodies of fresh water could be a link to Alzheimer’s. So perhaps in my tangled web of neurons one word beat out others to swim to the surface of my cognitive fog.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
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  4. datadragon

    datadragon Guest

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    Alzheimer's/ALS

    In my view of ME/CFS, I find it to contain the same early progression as I've outlined as ALS and Alzheimer's as well. amyloid-B is carried out by LRP-1 protein. The clearance mechanism is not working which leads to abnormal deposition of Aβ in brain cells. This study below links copper in the clearance of Aβ. Copper is normally blocked by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB), but accumulation of copper in blood vessels in the brain can, over time, cause damage to the blood brain barrier, letting copper atoms enter the brain tissue. Copper also disrupts the function of LRP-1 proteins, reducing the removal of Aβ from the brain, which leads to increased protein misfolding and cell damage.

    I. Singh, et al. “Low levels of copper disrupt brain amyloid-β homeostasis by altering its production and clearance.” PNAS, 110 (2013) 14771–14776. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3767519/

    Copper appears to be one of the main environmental factors that trigger the onset and enhance the progression of Alzheimer’s disease by preventing the clearance and accelerating the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain.
    https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news...ntified-as-culprit-in-alzheimers-disease.aspx

    • The most common form of familial ALS (fALS) is linked to a mutation in the SOD1 gene, which codes the SOD1 enzyme (Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOD1): – SOD1 (superoxide dismutase) is responsible of binding copper and zinc ions. - Another one I need to add to possible links for ME/CFS in my view.

    Sparks and Schreurs, in a published 2003 study, found that the addition of only 0.12 parts per million of copper to the drinking water of rabbits greatly enhanced the AD-type pathological changes in the brain, along with marked decrease in performance of previously learned tasks. They also later found that copper in drinking water at even 1/10 the U.S. EPA limit destroyed the blood-brain barrier receptors (LRP receptors) responsible for clearing amyloid beta from the brain, resulting in the hallmark accumulation of amyloid plaques.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC196927/
    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10937404.2010.499732?src=recsys

    In Alzheimer's disease, the hippocampus is one of the first regions of the brain to be affected, leading to the confusion and loss of memory so commonly seen in the early stages of the disease.” ~Dr. Ananya Mandal.
    Copper antagonizes zinc, and we know that zinc deprivation causes cell death in the hippocampus, where memories are recorded.

    https://coppertoxic.com/emotions
    http://alsanesthetics.org/research/2013-12-31-15-16-18/6-bmaa-copper-and-als -
    This guy is trying to link the cyanobacteria BMAA. Copper in a usable form would likely be responsible for fighting it.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15590663 - curcumin as a treatment
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/...180607Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM212133&et_rid=329470635
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
  5. Wally

    Wally Senior Member

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    Not sure if this article has been posted elsewhere, but it provides some interesting information on studies that are being conducted on 100 year old toxic algae samples to use as a baseline. From this baseline researchers are hoping that they will be able to see if evolving environmental changes have increased exposure to this toxin and in turn could provide evidence linking the toxin to increased neurodegenerative illnesses (such as ALS and Alzheimer’s). See, https://www.usnews.com/news/healthi...earchers-on-forefront-of-combating-alzheimers
     
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  6. Wally

    Wally Senior Member

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    @datadragon - As you can see from my previous posts my brain is rather cognitively challenged. I have been in a significant relapse for the last 2 1/2 months and only recently have I been feeling like some of the gears in my brain are starting up again. So I apologize upfront if my question or comments don’t make sense or they have been asked and answered elsewhere, but I am trying to understand your comments about copper and amyloid-B.

    Since ME it is not always a progressive illness, but often a remitting and relapsing illness, do you have a theory on how copper and amyloid-B would cause a different outcome in ME vs. ALS or Alzheimer’s? Do you think MS would also fall into to your copper theory? How would the copper theory explain cluster outbreaks that were appearing in the 1980’s thousands of miles apart?

    It does appear from reviewing historical data that significant problems with blue green algae were happening during some of the cluster outbreaks of ME. An environmental toxin can also make other pathogens more difficult or virulent for the immune system to handle, but it still seems that there are more illusive pieces to this puzzle.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
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  7. wastwater

    wastwater Senior Member

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    I saw they held a chlamydomonas (algae) meeting at lake Tahoe in 1994 and 1998

    Chlamydomonas and cAMP link
    Is there a connection to E Coli
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  8. datadragon

    datadragon Guest

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    A low level of usable copper is common in those with MS and Parkinson's Disease. Myelin is a protective coating on neurons that is progressively lost in patients with MS, due to abnormal immune system attacks that destroy the myelin sheath. As myelin degerates, neuronal function is destabilized and cell death ultimately results, contributing to disease progression and disability in MS patients. Here the NIH wants to study how the deficient levels of copper cause damage to the protective coating.
    https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday....rosis-study-into-copper-role-in-demyelination

    One thought with ME/CFS so far is that in adrenal fatigue/exhaustion we are losing the copper/iron protection that fights common mycotoxins as well as supression of TH1 immunity etc allowing viruses to reactivate, as well as infections to take hold.
    https://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?posts/982375/

    Abnormal Copper Homeostasis: Mechanisms and Roles in Neurodegeneration
    http://www.mdpi.com/2305-6304/2/2/327/pdf

    The antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), almost completely rescued LRP1 from Copper induced down-regulation it says in the first linked study above regarding alzheimer's. Cucurmin was mentioned in the other study to help with the accumulation of amyloid plaques and reduces amyloid.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018

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