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ME/CFS diagnosis guidelines don't examine fermentation in the gut?

Discussion in 'Diagnostic Guidelines and Laboratory Testing' started by markielock, Jul 21, 2015.

  1. markielock

    markielock staying independent, one day at a time

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    Scotland, UK
    Hi guys,

    Firstly - very sorry if this has been asked before; I did a bit of snooping but came up with a blank. I just have a rather pressing question in my mind that I'd like to share.

    • In my experience, no medical professional I've spoken to, even the specialist consultants in the fields of ME/CFS who diagnosed me at hospital, have asked me a lot about my diet beyond 'Make sure you eat well'.
    • fermentation in the upper gut can be an issue for people who eat a Western diet and causes the body to develop symptoms that are chracteristic to how I personally suffer ME/CFS.
    • If fermentation in the upper gut is such a common issue and I have characteristic symptoms, why was this possibility excluded from the process of elimination that led to my diagnosis of post-viral fatigue syndrome?
    • Is it typical that diet and the gut are not considered in the process of elimination toward a diagnosis for ME/CFS? If that's the case, why is that? Or have I missed something?
    Every day for me is a quest for betterment and the more I learn about general health, especially diet, shows me just how much more I can improve. Thanks to Sarah Myhill's information about fermentation in the upper gut, a lot of factors have been shown to me in a new light.

    I haven't had a labratory test but according to the clinical test criteria and the descriptions in her article really compel me to believe I may have a big issue with fermentation in the gut.

    I have started eating a 'Stone Age Diet' as Myhill (rightly) perscribes to anyone looking for an improved and healthy lifestyle and since learning about the gut I have made adjustments to address issues with fermentation in the upper gut in order to see how much difference it makes on my health.

    I was diagnosed with post-viral fatigue syndrome a year ago after living with the symptoms for 5 years. Looking back, a lot of the fluctuations in my health can be linked to diet. I feel that's true of everyone regardless but the effects and the symptoms of fermentation in the upper gut are a bit too close to my own symptoms be a coincidence in my opinion.

    I feel this positive adaptation with my diet will help me a LOT and make ME/CFS much easier to manage irrespective of having any issues with my gut. However, the point is what if it was a fermentation in the upper gut issue all along? Is it typical that diet and the gut are not considered in the process of elimination toward a diagnosis for ME/CFS? If that's the case, why is that? Or have I missed something?

    I appreciate that doctors are not neccesarily dieticians but I feel if these sensitivities in the gut cause' the same kind of effect surely it should be considered for a thorough diagnosis?

    Thanks a lot in advance guys! :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2015
    sarah darwins likes this.
  2. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    Dr. Dantini in Florida is very much into food allergies.
     
  3. markielock

    markielock staying independent, one day at a time

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    Thanks @minkeygirl, I'll have to check them out! :).
     
  4. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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  5. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    There's absolutely nothing wrong with fermentation in the gut. It's essential for the production of SCFAs that regulate a vast amount of biological functions in the body.
     
  6. markielock

    markielock staying independent, one day at a time

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    Sorry, I meant fermentation in the upper gut. Edited my original post to reflect this.
     

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