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Low T3 Syndrome is an autoimmune disease you've never heard of

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by pattismith, May 23, 2018.

  1. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    https://chriskresser.com/low-t3-syndrome-iv-an-autoimmune-disease-youve-never-heard-of/

    interesting theory

    @BadBadBear @bertiedog @Iritu1021

    Extract:


    What is autoimmune hypopituitarism?
    LAH is characterized by progressive destruction of pituitary tissue, which over time produces a decline in the function of the pituitary gland. (1) When the pituitary is damaged more than one hormone is affected, especially as the disease becomes more advanced.

    It was originally believed that LAH occurred exclusively in pregnant women. (2) But although prevalence is still much higher in that population, we now know it also occurs in non-pregnant women, men and children. (3)

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) deficiency is most common (60%), followed by thyrotropin (TSH) deficiency (47%), gonadotropin (FSH/LSH) deficiency (42%), growth hormone deficiency (42%) and prolactin deficiency (34%).

    What is remarkable about this condition is how unknown it is in spite of its prevalence. It’s true prevalence is unknown, but most investigators believe it is under-reported because it is often misdiagnosed. I’ve seen some estimates that it may affect up to 0.5% of the population and up to 40% of Hashimoto’s patients.

    How is autoimmune hypopituitarism diagnosed?
    The reason it’s so often misdiagnosed is that it’s difficult to pin down. It is strongly associated with other autoimmune diseases, which further complicates the clinical picture. In fact, concurrent autoimmune conditions are reported in 20-50% of LAH cases. (4)

    Interestingly, Yoon et al. injected hamsters with Rubella virus glycoproteins and consistently induced LAH, as evidenced by autoantibodies to pituitary cells and infiltration of the pituitary gland by lymphocytes. (5) This finding suggests there may be some connection between viral infections and LAH.

    Other investigators have identified antibodies to growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in cases of LAH. (6) Unfortunately, the only conclusive test for LAH is a tissue biopsy, which is obviously problematic due to the location of the pituitary gland.

    Low levels of the pituitary hormones can indicate LAH, but they can also be a sign of other functional problems with feedback in the hypothalamus or a primary problem with the hypothalamus itself.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2018
  2. Iritu1021

    Iritu1021 Breaking Through The Fog

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    Hmm.. I had Rubella as a child, twice. MRI of pituitary looked normal but of course it doesn't mean anything.
    I think the problem with hypothalamic or pituitary deficiency is that we replace the end hormones but not the hypothalamic/pituitary hormones, which also play an important function in CNS and neurotransmitter regulation...
     
  3. ScottTriGuy

    ScottTriGuy Stop the harm. Start the research and treatment.

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    I have empty sella syndrome (as does Jen Brea), I wonder if that is implicated?

    Although physicians have said a flattened ("effaced") pituitary is benign, for obvious reasons, I have little faith in the medical system.
     
    pattismith likes this.
  4. tiredowl

    tiredowl

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    Norway, Scandinavia
    TSH deficiency? So elevated TSH would rule this condition out? Interesting.
     
  5. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    yes there is a connection, your feeling is right

    Empty sella may be the final outcome in lymphocytic hypophysitis.


    Autoimmune hypophysitis may eventually become empty sella.

    From Pituitary Expansion to Empty Sella: Disease Progression in a Mouse Model of Autoimmune Hypophysitis

    Symptoms
    Empty sella is often an incidental imaging finding without associated symptoms. If there are symptoms, patients with empty sella syndrome can have headaches as symptoms of elevated spinal fluid pressure; symptoms of hypopituitarism; or visual symptoms, which can sometimes be due to downward, prolapse of the optic chiasm into the empty sella.

    Treatment
    Treatment is often not needed since empty sella is often an incidental finding. If there is associated hypopituitarism, hormone replacement is administered as indicated. Neurosurgery may be needed if there is associated chiasm prolapse in need of neurosurgical correction; if a small mciroadenoma is identified within the empty sella (in which case the finding may reflect an apoplexy event that went undiagnosed and reabsorbed over time, leaving behind them empty sella and microadenoma); or if pseudotumor cerebri is diagnosed and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is needed.

    https://pituitary.org/knowledge-base/disorders/empty-sella-syndrome

    Are you supplemented with hormons?
     
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  6. ScottTriGuy

    ScottTriGuy Stop the harm. Start the research and treatment.

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    Wow, thanks for the links, I'll take them to my doctor when I see him in 2 weeks.

    I also see the eye doctor soon too, so will bring to his attention.

    I am on dessicated thyroid now and I'm not nearly as sensitive to the cold as I became with ME onset.

    I do have pain / pressure on the back of my head that worsens when I bend over, kind of suspected it was spinal fluid pressure.
     
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  7. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    That said,
    I do not fully agree with Chris Kresser, the low T3 syndrome is not 100% central hypothyrodism/hypopituitarism,
    because deiodinases type 1 and/or 3 are involved, so I have still not fully understood this syndrome
     
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  8. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    I've found pituitary glandular, along w/ adrenal and hypothalamus glandular, very supportive. Unfortunately, hypothalamus doesn't seem to be available any more.
     
    pattismith likes this.

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