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High Costs of Low-Grade Inflammation: Persistent Fatigue as a Consequence of Reduced Cellular-Energy

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Murph, May 15, 2018.

  1. Murph

    Murph :)

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    The High Costs of Low-Grade Inflammation: Persistent Fatigue as a Consequence of Reduced Cellular-Energy Availability and Non-adaptive Energy Expenditure
    [​IMG]Tamara E. Lacourt*, [​IMG]Elisabeth G. Vichaya, [​IMG]Gabriel S. Chiu, [​IMG]Robert Dantzer and [​IMG]Cobi J. Heijnen
    • Neuroimmunology Laboratory, Symptom Research Department, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Institute, Houston, TX, United States
    Chronic or persistent fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom of several diseases. Persistent fatigue has been associated with low-grade inflammation in several models of fatigue, including cancer-related fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome. However, it is unclear how low-grade inflammation leads to the experience of fatigue. We here propose a model of an imbalance in energy availability and energy expenditure as a consequence of low-grade inflammation.

    In this narrative review, we discuss how chronic low-grade inflammation can lead to reduced cellular-energy availability. Low-grade inflammation induces a metabolic switch from energy-efficient oxidative phosphorylation to fast-acting, but less efficient, aerobic glycolytic energy production; increases reactive oxygen species; and reduces insulin sensitivity. These effects result in reduced glucose availability and, thereby, reduced cellular energy. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with increased willingness to exert effort under specific circumstances.

    Circadian-rhythm changes and sleep disturbances might mediate the effects of inflammation on cellular-energy availability and non-adaptive energy expenditure. In the second part of the review, we present evidence for these metabolic pathways in models of persistent fatigue, focusing on chronic fatigue syndrome and cancer-related fatigue. Most evidence for reduced cellular-energy availability in relation to fatigue comes from studies on chronic fatigue syndrome.

    While the mechanistic evidence from the cancer-related fatigue literature is still limited, the sparse results point to reduced cellular-energy availability as well. There is also mounting evidence that behavioral-energy expenditure exceeds the reduced cellular-energy availability in patients with persistent fatigue. This suggests that an inability to adjust energy expenditure to available resources might be one mechanism underlying persistent fatigue.


    Full-text here: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00078/full It is clear these guys are not really aware of issues in ME/CFS and just bundled us in to their paper. It is an interesting broad perspective on fatigue though.
     
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  2. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

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    United States, New Hampshire
    This sounds very familiar.:)

    Jim
     
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  3. Runner5

    Runner5 Senior Member

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    PNW
    It sounds a lot like the model of insulin resistance, is it related?
     
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  4. debored13

    debored13 Senior Member

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    Vermont, school in Western MA
    this would mean "reductive stress", no? the production of lactate instead of oxidation of pyruvate
     
  5. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

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    I really don't know. Are you just curious or is there a bigger picture that you have, that reductive stress plays a big part in CFS?

    Jim
     

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