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Help with activity pacing

Discussion in 'Lifestyle Management' started by CreativeB, May 15, 2018.

  1. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    Hi

    I'm looking for some advice and suggestions to help me manage my symptoms. I'm trying to figure out my energy envelope and how to pace my activities.

    I've been reading a lot of the information but I'm struggling ... or maybe I'm just impatient. I'd say my symptoms are mild to moderate. I work full time. I work from home one day a week but find that whether it's that day or the weekend I relax when at home and crash.

    I've started to keep a detailed journal to see if I can identify patterns or triggers.

    More than anything I feel overwhelmed and don't know where to start.
     
    manasi12 likes this.
  2. rel8ted

    rel8ted

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    Take a LOT of 10-15 minute breaks. I can get showered and dressed, but then need to lay down to rest a bit. My whole day is basically like that. Do very little, lay down a bit. If I let myself go and push past that, I have a really bad next day or 2 (can be more if I way overdo it). I might be able to prep dinner in stages and the hub cooks it when he gets home. The crockpot has become our best friend. Cleaning the house is basically a one room at a time affair. If i get one a day done, great, otherwise it just has to wait. It seems ridiculous at first, but I know I function much better if I listen to my body and stop at the first sign of being tired.
     
  3. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    Thanks Rel8ted

    When I'm at home I do more ... I need to rest after the shower and before I get dressed. I guess at work it's easy to just keep pushing. But I have found I'll grab a chair and sit down with students, but breaks aren't always possible :eek:
     
  4. *GG*

    *GG* senior member

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    Perhaps you don't need the attachment provided since you already do a diary?
     

    Attached Files:

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  5. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    Thank you *GG*
     
  6. Snowdrop

    Snowdrop Rebel without a biscuit

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    My suggestion would be to get one of those wrist monitors if you can. Like a fitbit for example (I have a Garmin)

    You then can know in a more direct and specific way when your heart rate goes high or how many steps you've taken in a day.
    That way there is some feedback as to when to stop an activity or even how to even out your day so you don't do too much at once.

    Although I don't know your status the monitor thing may work better the more ill you are.
     
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  7. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    Thank you Snowdrop. I had been considering one but hadnt thought about using it in that way.
     
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  8. Mel9

    Mel9 Senior Member

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    I used it to teach myself when I have done too much. I now know the threshold and try to keep my heart rate lower.

    Another useful measurement for me is temperature (under the tongue). When I have overdone things it becomes very low.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
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  9. Plum

    Plum Senior Member

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    This for me was the BIGGEST help. I have a Garmin too. It's taught me to be more energy efficient i.e. don't waste steps if I can, and it helps on days I'm not aware I'm worse and then my elevated heart rate makes me realise I need to take it easier.

    The biggest difference it made was that I cut right back on activity and found a way to do what was absolutely necessary with the fewest number of steps and then the only other things I did was properly rest. This allowed be to get rid of some of my symptoms like severe muscle pain. Now I know that the pain isn't just an uncontrollable part of my ME that I have to deal with but rather a symptom I can improve by not doing too much.
     
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  10. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    Thank you Mel 9 and Plum.

    I've a silly question ... How do I tag people?
     
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  11. Mel9

    Mel9 Senior Member

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    Write @ in front of the name
     
    percyval577 likes this.
  12. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    percyval577 and Mel9 like this.
  13. CedarHome

    CedarHome

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    I use a heart rate variability monitor.

    It takes a few minutes lying still each morning to get a daily reading.
    It is oriented toward athletes-- the report is either "Okay for training" or "recommend low intensity workout day" ;)

    I've found that it gives me a heads up on especially low capacity and energy BEFORE I notice them. It's a leading indicator. It drops a couple days before I get sick and it jumps a couple days before I feel better.

    When the level is in the tank I know to do as little as possible--- and to cancel all nonessential work obligations.
    We are so adept at "pushing through" when we should not!

    It does take quite a while monitoring before the patterns emerge though.
     
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  14. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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    Thanks @CedarHome. I'm definitely going to get a monitor
     
    Lisa108 likes this.
  15. CedarHome

    CedarHome

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  16. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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  17. Lolo

    Lolo Senior Member

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  18. CreativeB

    CreativeB Senior Member

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  19. HeleneG

    HeleneG

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    I have an Apple Watch and found out that my heart rate zooms up when I take a shower (highest 210) and when I fall asleep. I don't know what it means, but I am seeing a cardiologist to see if I should worry.
     
    Lisa108 likes this.

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