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CBS up-regulating or down-regulating?

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by juniemarie, Jul 25, 2013.

  1. juniemarie

    juniemarie Senior Member

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    Albuquerque
    I'm trying to understand this. If my homocysteine is high does it mean the normally up-regulating CBS SNP is down-regulating instead and not creating the Yasko "bath tub" effect but the opposite?
     
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    The CBS SNP that you have does nothing at all - it won't raise or decrease homocysteine. But you have other SNPs that have been shown to raise homocysteine in various studies.
     
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  3. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    Sth Australia
    MTHFR polymorphism commonly raises homeocysteine or will put one into the higher levels of normal.
     
  4. juniemarie

    juniemarie Senior Member

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    Albuquerque
    Valentijn I think it has finally sunk in! Thanks for putting me on the right track I read what I could find about it today and it seems MTRR-A66G can be a major contributor impairing the ability to clear homocysteine. Having to do with methionine conversion.So I am going to move on from CBS. Am taking everything I should be taking for CBS and have reduced thiols so going to say bye bye to CBS The only scary thing I read about MTRR A66G is the brain tumor thing.
     
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  5. Bluebell

    Bluebell Senior Member

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    I thought, "Brain tumor thing, what brain tumor thing?" and so I looked at this--

    "The highest risk of meningioma was associated with heterozygosity for both MTHFR variants [odds ratio (OR), 2.11; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.42-3.12]. The corresponding OR for glioma was 1.23 (95% CI, 0.91-1.66).
    A significant association between risk of meningioma and homozygosity for MTRR 66G was also observed (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.02-1.94).
    "Similarly, the AG genotype [of MTRR A66G] was also associated with an increased risk albeit nonsignificantly (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.94-1.55"
    "Our findings provide support for the role of folate metabolism in the development of primary brain tumors."
    http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/17/5/1195.full

    Looks like I have an odds ratio of 2.11 for a meningioma from double-hetero C677T/A1298C, plus a 1.23 odds ratio for a glioma from the same, and a bonus 1.21 odds ratio for a meningioma from my hetero MTRR A66G.

    I think 23andMe should really have reports available for these genes.
     

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