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blunted cortisol reactivity to psychosocial stress in tinnitus sufferers

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by pattismith, Sep 28, 2018.

  1. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    The sound of stress: blunted cortisol reactivity to psychosocial stress in tinnitus sufferers.
    2007
    Abstract
    Clinical observations suggest that tinnitus is modulated by stress.
    However, there is little empirical data to support the link between stress and tinnitus.
    In this study, we measured the stress hormone cortisol to examine the reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in tinnitus participants as well as in healthy controls without tinnitus.
    Eighteen participants with tinnitus and 18 controls without tinnitus were exposed to the Trier Social Stress Task and cortisol sampling and subjective ratings were obtained at regular intervals.
    Tinnitus participants displayed a blunted cortisol response to psychosocial stress, in comparison with healthy controls who had a typical cortisol release about 30 min after the beginning of the experiment.
    The blunted cortisol response displayed by the tinnitus participants suggests that they have an anomaly along the HPA axis.
    Their cortisol response is similar to that found in other bodily stress-related diseases and thus suggests that tinnitus is related to stress. However, tinnitus intensity might not be modulated by stress in a concurrent manner.
     
  2. InitialConditions

    InitialConditions

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    Lancashire, UK
    tinnitus was one of my first symptoms after falling ill. This was a couple of weeks after a stressful period where I also had what I assumed was a mild viral illness. I would go on to have almost four years of what I now consider to be a pre-ME phase, where I was tired, had generalized pain (mostly mild), and tinnitus in my left ear. I am convinced the tinnitus is a clue to my ME, and that the two are inherently related. It's so frustrating that both are so poorly understood!
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
  3. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    I do have tinnitus too, and it seems to be related to intracellular calcium.

    If I take drugs that are supposed to increase intracel calcium, my tinnitus is quickly increased.

    If you are in that case, Nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker that crosses the Brain barrier may help you. Unfortunately there is little chance for me to have access to it...

    What I found interesting to read from this paper is:

    "The blunted cortisol response displayed by the tinnitus participants suggests that they have an anomaly along the HPA axis."

    We may have a relative adrenal insufficiency under stimulation (stress), so we lack stress hormons.

    In my case, I experienced a big improvement under some very stressful times, after I started my T3 treatement.

    This suggest that I am lacking both T3 and stress hormons, and that my HPA axis is able to function a bit better when a strong stressful event happens.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
  4. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

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    United States, New Hampshire
    I have experienced tinnitus on occasion for years with my CFS. I recently started high dose BCAA's and they seem to have stopped 95% of my tinnitus.

    I usually get it when I increase my dose of antibiotic herbs, from bacterial die-off in my gut. When I get it now, it's barely noticeable.

    The only thing I have found to explain the BCAA's working. Is that they cause a switch in the brain from pro-inflammatory macrophage stimulation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage stimulation- M1 to M2.

    Maybe this switch to anti-inflammatory macrophage stimulation some how allows the HPA to work better by reducing inflammation it the HPA? Therefore almost eliminating my tinnitus.
     
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  5. InitialConditions

    InitialConditions

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    Lancashire, UK
    That's interesting. What BCAA product were you taking?
     
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  6. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

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    United States, New Hampshire
    I am using this one at 15 grams a day on an empty stomach.

    Not only has it almost completely stopped any tinnitus it has given me much more energy, less PEM and also completely stopped the flu-like flares I was getting!
     
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  7. Moof

    Moof Senior Member

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    UK
    I used to have quite severe tinnitus, but as it largely disappeared when I started on B12 injections, it was probably caused by my deficiency. I have a slight residual whistle in one ear, but the most disruptive symptoms have thankfully gone. For anyone who's struggling with tinnitus, it might be worth at least ruling out B12 deficiency as a cause – specially those in middle age or older (many people absorb this vitamin less and less well as they age).
     
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  8. Judee

    Judee Senior Member

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    Wisconsin
    When I looked up that study on tinnitus, I noticed a "blunted response" study for childhood asthma too. I wonder if a lot of us with ME/CFS have a blunted response even when our cortisol levels check out. My last test said my symptoms indicated my adrenals were having a difficult time keeping up even though my levels were mostly normal.

    I'm starting to think that is why I feel better at night because my body needs less then so it doesn't have to work so hard to churn it out.

    Cortef helps when I'm dealing with a lot of stress but I don't like to rely on it. I wonder if the BCAA is helping by supporting the adrenals. I'm going to put it on my list of things to try. I just have to get a dairy free version.

    Thanks for posting this and all the responses. Everything is very helpful.
     
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