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B12 causing insane anxiety, racing thoughts, and jitteriness!

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by joejack102, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. joejack102

    joejack102 Senior Member

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    I'm taking 500mcg (five-hundred micrograms) of Cyanocobalamin B12. It is causing me to experience quite a significant level of anxiety, racing thoughts, and jitteriness. Is there a chance or likelihood that it is just my body "getting adjusted to it" and that these symptoms will disappear if I continue to take it for a few weeks, or is this a bad sign that my body is not reacting well and that I need to drastically decrease my dose and/or stop using it altogether?
     
  2. robinhood12345

    robinhood12345 Senior Member

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    That is not a big dose. I have taken 50,000 mcg b12 before with no problems. They used to use even higher doses in some studies for problems like ALS. If someone thought they were b12 deficient they can do a blood test for it. Eating foods high in b12 like molluscs, and beef liver would be better than supplementing it.
     
  3. WoolPippi

    WoolPippi Senior Member

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    drastically decrease.
    I have the same symptoms and decreased to 75 mcg per day and do not take it every day.

    It is not a bad sign. Not at all.

    Might be something logically like: your cells were never used to get their hands on B12, because of DNA mutations messing with their methylation cycle. Along come you and you give them yet fuel (mB12, the already methylated form of B12).
    They floor the gas pedal!

    So just ease up on the trottle, decrease your dosage. Look into supplementing with methylated Folium (brand name Metafolin) and Phosphatidylserine. I do not know why the last one, it was recommended by my doctor because of the egging on of cell processes with mB12.

    I have some DNA mutations that cause very little B12 available to my cells' methylation cycle.
    It's the enzymes MTR and MTRR. They use and re-use B12. I'm homozygote for both so my cells don't know what to do with B12 and if they do they chuck it fast.
    These enzymes work with the aid of dopamine and zinc. They are hindered by lead, alum and mercury.

    My blood levels of B12 look exemplary. But are useless because MTR and MTRR can't use the vitamin. Unless in it's methylated form: mB12.

    You and I are bypassing the body's safeguard when taking already methylated B12 instead of the regular vitamin. So it is up to us to figure out which dosis fits our body best.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
  4. LINE

    LINE

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    B vitamins work on different functions in the body, b12 is stimulating. B vitamins are a balancing act, which means if you increase one then others may decrease. It is best to take a balanced b complex, I get good results with Solaray Nutritionally Balanced B complex. The b vitamins are balanced so in theory, nothing becomes dominant or submissive.
     
    Wolfcub and alkt like this.
  5. Wolfcub

    Wolfcub

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    I am wondering if Cyanocobalamin is the best idea...(?) I am sure I have heard that Methylcobalamin is better?

    I am on the verge of experimenting with this, and really don't know a lot yet. And if anyone knows more than I do about it please let us know here.

    True, a single B vitamin is best combined with the others, so a special B complex might be best. That I heard about many years ago.
    I think ....that as B vitamins are water soluble, you cannot overdose. You will just "pee yellow and expensive" as your body will absorb what it needs and pee out the rest.
    Again, if anyone knows better please comment on that. I am no expert, an could also do with good advice about it as am thinking of trying Methylcobalamin .
     
    WoolPippi likes this.
  6. joejack102

    joejack102 Senior Member

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    I would issue a strong warning that nobody consider trying B12 supplementation in any form. I have now tried both methylcobalamin and cyanocobalamin on multiple occasions, and it honestly left me severely anxious to the point where I felt like I was going crazy! It made me ready to jump out of my own skin, and caused me to have insane panic attacks. I will never be reattempting B12 supplementation again in my life!!!!!

    Also, keep in mind, the recommended daily dose is less than 3 MICRO-grams. Yes, less than 3 mcg. B12 deficiency is very rare. There is no reason to be taking 100,000x's the recommended daily dose of a vitamin.
     
  7. robinhood12345

    robinhood12345 Senior Member

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    I would issue a strong warning that high dose b12 is safe, and effective for treating some problems so no need to worry. Anecdotally I have taken cyana, and methyl b12 high dose with no problems.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25982504

    BACKGROUND:
    High-dose of methylcobalamin promotes nerve regeneration in rats with acrylamide neuropathy. A double-blind controlled trial suggested that high-dose methylcobalamin could increase compound muscle action potentials in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A large-scale extended period human trial is now on-going in ALS (Clinicaltrial.govNCT00444613). We attempted to study whether high-dose methylcobalamin can improve symptoms or retard progression of motor dysfunction in the wobbler mouse model of ALS.

    METHODS:
    After initial diagnosis of the disease at the postnatal age of 3-4 weeks, wobbler mice received methylcobalamin (3 or 30 mg/kg, n=10/group) or vehicle (n=10), daily for 4 weeks by intraperitoneal administration in a blinded fashion. We compared clinical symptoms and pathological changes among all groups. Vitamin B12 concentrations were measured in the serum, the skeletal muscle and the spinal cord of three groups (n=5/group).

    RESULTS:
    In comparison with vehicle, mice treated with ultra-high dose (30 mg/kg) of methylcobalaminsignificantly inhibited muscle weakness and contracture in the forelimb, and increased the weight of the bicep muscles and the number of musculocutaneous nerves. Methylcobalamin-treated mice significantly elevated vitamin B12 concentrations of the serum, the bicep muscle and the spinal cord compared to vehicle.

    CONCLUSION:
    Our results suggest that treatment with methylcobalamin could delay progression of motor symptoms and neuropathological changes in wobbler mouse motor neuron disease if very high doses are used.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17969354

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. Weakness may begin in the legs, hands, proximal arms, or pharynx. The course is relentless and progressive without remissions, relapses, or even stable plateaus. There is no effective drug therapy for ALS, although riluzole has been shown to prolong life in sufferers, without tracheostomy. A vitamin B12 analog, methylcobalamin, has a protective effect on cultured cortical neurons against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity. We have shown the ultra-high-dose methylcobalamin (25 mg/day i.m.) slows down the progressive reduction of the CMAP (compound muscle action potential) amplitudes in ALS in the short term (4 weeks). The latencies of SSR (sympathetic skin response) were shorter after treatment (50 mg/day i.v., 2 weeks). In the long-term effect of methylcobalamin (50 mg/day i.m., twice a week), the survival time (or the period to become respirator-bound) was significantly longer in the treated group than in the untreated. Larger-scale randomized double blind trial was started in Japan in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy and the safety of ultra-high-dose methylcobalamin for sporadic or familial cases of ALS.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 11, 2018
  8. WoolPippi

    WoolPippi Senior Member

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    I do not agree with you.

    B12 deficiency is not rare. Blood panels do not always show defiency. Many people benefit from repairing their deficiency.

    I do agree that starting with high doses is unneccesary. The doses recommended in some protocols on this site are way too high. (I forget the names, the smart ME dr. who died. Dr. Frank Konijnenburg? And the man who build on his wisdom. Sorry I’ll come back and edit the names.)

    I do agree suplementation is difficult and is never a single cause single effect thing. Pulling one string makes everything jiggle. Start low, go slow.

    Since you have the same sensitive reaction to mB12 as I have I want to warn you for Copper Dump.

    Copper Dump occurs when you take much Zinc when you’re deficient. I had it with only 25 mcg per day. Zinc causes Copper to release from your cells and tissue. This too will cause panic attacks and they will last for days. I was crazy for 2 or 3 weeks and could barely hang on. But I knew the cause and rode it out while my body chelated the Copper.

    Ain’t brain chemistry a hoot :/
     
  9. LINE

    LINE

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    Keep in mind that bio-individuality exists which means what works for one does not for the other. There are quite a few enzymatic reactions that occur in body and these are largely dependent on sufficent nutrients to perform. Needs can vary from person to person. Experimentation is the best teacher.
     
    Wolfcub likes this.
  10. Sushi

    Sushi Moderation Resource Albuquerque

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    Everyone is different--some do have very negative reactions to B12 supplementation. I had very bad reactions to methylcobalamin every time I tried it at whatever dose. I don't think we can make any "blanket" statements on the value of B12 supplementation as the effect varies greatly from person to person.
     
    WoolPippi likes this.

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