Professor & patients' paper on the solvable biological challenge of ME/CFS: reader-friendly version
Simon McGrath provides a patient-friendly version of a peer-reviewed paper which highlights some of the most promising biomedical research on ME/CFS ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Always hungry!!

Discussion in 'Gastrointestinal and Urinary' started by lowkey, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. lowkey

    lowkey

    Messages:
    26
    Likes:
    15
    Hey guys,
    I hope you are all doing well given the circumstances. I just have a quick query about hunger? Recently, I have been eating a lot! I will have a smoothie in the morning packed with good stuff. I will have morning tea, a big lunch, afternoon tea, dinner and something after dinner. I will also snack throughout the day. I'm not eating huge portions, and it isn't unhealthy food (mostly). However, even straight after i've eaten a meal, i am hungry again. I am not gaining weight. For context, I am a 20 year old male. 173cm tall, I weight about 60kg and have slim build. Before I was ill I would exercise daily, and have never really eaten this much. Any ideas about what is happening?
    Thanks
     
  2. ScottTriGuy

    ScottTriGuy Stop the harm. Start the research and treatment.

    Messages:
    1,171
    Likes:
    4,755
    Toronto, Canada
    Pre-ME I always had a very strong hunger drive ("I'm hungry" escaped my lips multiple times a day as my colleague can attest) and so it was hard to keep weight off.

    Now I don't have an appetite and so am more concerned about keeping weight on.

    I don't know what's happening (obviously), but I think my gut flora may have changed...pure speculation.
     
  3. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes:
    12,053
    Silicon Valley, CA
    @lowkey -- if you're eating but not gaining, that could be:

    • hyperthyroid - any anxiety, shakiness, feeling 'on' all the time?
    • parasites - any travel lately?
    Just some ideas -- not to be taken as medical advice, obviously.

    -J
     
  4. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,372
    Likes:
    845
    Your cortisol may be really high as well.
     
  5. Art Vandelay

    Art Vandelay Senior Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes:
    1,511
    Adelaide, Australia
    Insulin resistance? A glucose tolerance test with matching insulin levels is one good way to test this.
     
  6. Mrs Sowester

    Mrs Sowester Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,033
    Likes:
    7,297
    @lowkey that happens to me when I'm moving into a relapse/flare-up/crash too.
    The crazy hunger came with the big virus that floored me in 2010, I suddenly wanted two sandwiches instead of one, then my eating almost doubled. It took about 3months of over eating before I started to gain weight, then I ballooned.
    For the first few years when I was in an ME boom and bust cycle I found the hunger goes when in boom and comes with the bust. I now take out of the ordinary hunger as a warning to slow down completely with activities - I think I'm averting massive PEM crashes this way, although that might just be hopeful thinking!
     
  7. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

    Messages:
    8,006
    Likes:
    12,941
    Cornwall, UK
    I was always hungry until I cut out gluten and reduced sugar and grains. Now my appetite is normal, probably because I no longer have the blood glucose spikes and troughs caused by too much carbohydrate.
     
  8. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,212
    Likes:
    7,430
    I echo the cutting out sugars and have to be very careful with grains. If I allow sugar spikes it seems to awaken a monster within me that can only be satisfied by carbs.

    I was also advised to substitute smoothies (particularly fruit ones) with just eating fruit - obviously some fruit like bananas and grapes are higher in natural sugars than others.

    If I have grains/carbs I try to have small portions of wholegrain. Eating a little fat with carbs can also slow down the sugar release.

    We are all different so it's worth experimenting - keeping a food diary will give you a good record as to which foods are more likely to leave you feeling hungry later.
     
    MeSci likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page