• Phoenix Rising needs funds to operate: please consider donating to support PR

Author Dan Millman (on Healing)

In Case you don't know the name of Dan Millman, I would like to introduce you to him. He has great Insight & Wisdom. And I very much admire his middle way approach to life. I have some of his books & his DVD called the Peaceful Warrior. If you like what he has written below, you might like to check out his Blogs on his website. His life story - as an elite gymnast who suffers a terrible motorbike accident shattering his leg in something like 17? places is one of my most uplifting stories. He is one of my "mentors" - perhaps in only the fact, that I love a good success story rising against unimaginable odds.

Apologies to Dan for copying this straight off his website blog, but I'm sure he will understand my actions in posting this on Phoenix.


Good for What Ails You
Friday January 23rd 2009, 6:15 pm
Filed under: Dan's Posts
I begin with a core principle of the Way that I teach — that there is no best book, teacher, religion, or system of diet, exercise, food, healing or psychology. Only the best for a given individual at a given time in life.

Life is an experiment; it is our right and responsibility to find out what best serves our own growth, healing, evolution and spirit. People worldwide have significant similarities due to the nature of our body and nervous systems; but we also have differences. And each of us changes over time and thus what best serves us may also change.

Take the area of healing. In the course of our lives, symptoms may arise due to injury or genetics or lifestyle. It has nothing to due with blame but does involve responsibility to live in a generally balanced way to support our genetic potential. This does not mean we have to live like puritans — but by following sensible guidelines involving regular exercise, balanced diet (for us) and sufficient rest, we give ourselves better odds of enjoying better vitality over time.

At those times we have an injury or illness, the process we go through and decisions we make may sometimes be sensible and straightforward — or at other times confusing and complicated. Many of us have medical misadventure stories to share!

It may be as simple as seeing our doctor, getting a diagnosis, then following sound advice. Some diseases are more challenging than others. Some are acute and others are chronic conditions. Sometimes we can see and understand how our past behaviors may have contributed to our condition; other times, it seems like a roll of the dice.

It would seem critically important (but difficult for so many) to apply clear thinking and discernment to symptoms and treatment. Because our choice of health professionals and treatment will strongly influence the outcomes. Health professionals, whether traditional or complementary, are at best educated advisors. They cannot heal us; they can only assist in the process.

In addition to traditional allopathic medicine, we can find naturopaths, holistic and energy healers, chiropractors, acupuncturists, practitioners of ayurveda and shamanism and homeopathic practitioners, and many other approaches to healing. Some of these approaches work better than a placebo treatment; others do not.

Those of us who resonate with the Hindu or Vedic traditions may like ayurveda; others who have perhaps lived (past lives?) in China or Japan may gravitate towards acupuncture, Chinese herbs and other Asian philosophy and approaches. It comes to this: Find what works best for you — what you have confidence in.

But please use common sense! If you break your leg, go to an orthopedic physician first!

Western medicine and its developing technology is particularly good at diagnosing the problem and recommending the best course of treatment based upon what has been shown (statistically) to be the most effective approach. But doctors also know that due to individual differences in their patients, both physical and psychological, an element of guesswork is involved. So they hesitate to make specific predictions or prognoses.

I would generally advise most people to carefully choose (as much as is possible in your circumstances) a medical professional, and to favor experienced western-trained medical doctors — especially for puzzling or potentially serious illness or injury — before pursuing so-called "alternative" treatments. Or use complementary medicine to do just that — to complement traditional care.

Be aware that not all "standard" treatment is the same! In medicine, as in any other field, you will find a bell curve of competence, from incompetent to brilliant. Some hair-cutters or plumbers or psychotherapists or stockbrokers are more knowledgeable and skillful than others. The same is true for physicians. Yet many people take more time to choose a hairdresser than a surgeon!

We have all heard anecdotal reports of cancer patients going into remission spontaneously, and tumors shrinking mysteriously or even "miraculously" — with patients crediting radical dietary changes, rigorous exercise routines, laying on of hands, prayer, or other forms of healing. If there were clear evidence of any one or combination of these "natural" approaches healing cancer, doctors would be the first to sing its praises.

No single approach (including chemotherapy and/or radiation) works for everyone. So in addition to the most recognized and tested treatments, one can also try complementary method in consultation with their doctor, who can usually provide information and options.

When health issues arise, we must each choose our own path, but can also find the best guide on our healing quest.

Comments

....Western medicine and its developing technology is particularly good at diagnosing the problem and recommending the best course of treatment based upon what has been shown (statistically) to be the most effective approach.

I think Mr Millman is coming at this from a completely different direction from us with long term chronic illness where the medical profession has NOT 'diagnosed the problem and recommended the best course of treatment based upon what has been shown (statistically) to be the most effective approach' in fact it has failed us and further has nothing to teach us about regaining health as it centers on one thing and treats the problem after the model of a machine.

Having a smahed leg which the medical profession is rather good at sorting out is bound to affect one's persepective.

Many of us have had nothing but grief from the medics.

There are tried and tested universal methods for healing including raw vegetable juices which will help everyone to obetain the enzymes lacking in their diet. I just don't see things at all like this writer.

Brenda
 
brenda;bt156 said:
....Western medicine and its developing technology is particularly good at diagnosing the problem and recommending the best course of treatment based upon what has been shown (statistically) to be the most effective approach.

I think Mr Millman is coming at this from a completely different direction from us with long term chronic illness where the medical profession has NOT 'diagnosed the problem and recommended the best course of treatment based upon what has been shown (statistically) to be the most effective approach' in fact it has failed us and further has nothing to teach us about regaining health as it centers on one thing and treats the problem after the model of a machine.

Having a smahed leg which the medical profession is rather good at sorting out is bound to affect one's persepective.

Many of us have had nothing but grief from the medics.
There are tried and tested universal methods for healing including raw vegetable juices which will help everyone to obetain the enzymes lacking in their diet. I just don't see things at all like this writer.

Brenda
I actually meant to introduce you to Dan Millman, not necessarily say that this particular piece of his is right or wrong.

He has used several alternatives therapies in his life, especially the power of positive thinking & also one of my favourite philosophies ie focus on healing. Focus on the moment. Trust in yourself.

In this piece Brenda, he is trying to convey the need to use conventional medicine & hospitals when necessary ie a broken leg needs a hospital & in his case surgery & bone grafts etc.

I really do recommend some of his blogs/posts. He is very good on taking the middle road. He does not pressure or present certain methods as being good or bad.

He says being open & receptive in your mindset is very important.

I could relate some stories of medical practioners & specialists that would make your blood boil (& will probably do so some time in the future). One day, I will write my story, but it is too long & I need to find time to summarise & cut it down to a readable statement.

I guess I am concentrating on mind & spirit more these days. I am focusing on what is important in life (not necessarily 100% healing). My focus is more on improving my life overall. And it is making for an amazing & most enlightening journey. It is filling my life with positive energy (for the most part).

Victoria
 
Oh I see - sorry Lyme brain drain.

I will have a look at his blog thanks

It's all a balance isn't it - what we are ready for.

I am open to having permanent damage that I cannot heal, or even to just holding the Lyme at bay to give me a bit longer, but at the same time, I do not want to set a limit on what is achievable and I believe that organs etc can rebuild. So I am going all out for healing and believing for the best and aiming for the stars but keeping my feet on the ground so I will not be disappointed but at least I will never have to regret not going 100% this time when I think I still have a chance. One day we have no chance left.

Getting to this mindset has involved a long journey and a lot of emotional healing but I have never been so positive or at peace.

Brenda
 

Blog entry information

Author
Victoria
Views
141
Comments
3
Last update

More entries in User Blogs

More entries from Victoria