The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

'Yuppie flu' an inflammatory disease which blood test could easily diagnose, say scientists

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Barry53, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. Barry53

    Barry53 Senior Member

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    Last edited: Jul 31, 2017
  2. Barry53

    Barry53 Senior Member

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    Google search will show up several other reports of same thing.
     
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  3. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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  4. Barry53

    Barry53 Senior Member

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    Agreed. But they do then tentatively point out its inappropriateness within the article. If the yuppie flu headline draws people in to then read that its not what they assumed it to be ... I can live with that.
     
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    I disagree
    It's like saying Niggers blah blah... and then saying later in the article "use of the term Nigger is inappropriate blah blah". Slurs like this are never appropriate.
     
  6. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member

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    It's not like the term "yuppie" isn't out of date or anything... I have a feeling that, were it an option, these folks would still be calling it "beatnik flu" or "whig flu."
     
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  7. TiredBill

    TiredBill Senior Member

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    Since I contracted CFS when the term "yuppie flu" was current, I'm less rankled.

    If they find a positive diagnostic marker (or better yet, a cure) they can call it whatever they want as far as I'm concerned.

    Bill
     
  8. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    Yeah...slapping scare quotes on a derisive name doesn't suddenly make it OK for a headline. Does the Telegraph say 'retards' when writing an article about autism or 'cretins' when writing about people with thyroid problems?
     
  9. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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  10. Old Bones

    Old Bones Senior Member

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  11. Lolo

    Lolo Senior Member

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    Yeah but a lot of the time I only read the headlines and I am sure a lot of other people do as well.

    And I don't know about others but for me CFS is not extreme tiredness but extreme fatigue and or exhaustion. I wish I was so tired that I could sleep but I am not.:(
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2017
  12. Wolfiness

    Wolfiness Activity Level 0

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    :D
     
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  13. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    "Simply put, Montoya says, those tests aren't measuring the right things."

    What I've been telling my doctors for years...

    "There is much to learn," Komaroff writes, in the journal. "Hopefully, a decade from now, "doctors will know better what to measure and, more importantly, what to do to ease the suffering caused by this illness."

    I can't wait a decade... this makes me want to give up
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2017
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  14. Wonko

    Wonko Senior Member

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    The other side.
    Neither can I
     
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  15. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member

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    Has anyone seen a link to Dr. Komaroff's commentary? I don't know if it would be available on-line or only in the print edition of PNAS.
     
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  16. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    No, I haven't been able to find it. I'd expect it to appear on the PNAS 'early edition' in the next update or two.

    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/recent
     
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  17. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member

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    I do like the way the concise way this is put:
    ...or it's staying on deliberately to fight some chronic threat, or some cascade of events following infection has triggered autoimmunity (if that's possible).
     
  18. boolybooly

    boolybooly

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    What happened to subtypes?

    Regarding the car crash example its not necessarily the same syndrome if CFS occurs after a trauma compared to a virus.

    While I welcome the optimistic tone coming from Stanford and the recognition of reality coming from The Telegraph you cant get to there from here without distinguishing subtypes.
     
  19. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    Is this the list of subtypes that you're referring to?

    1. Type 1 - high levels of depression and anxiety as well as poor sleep and high degrees of pain.
    2. Type 2 - severe post-exertional fatigue, joint and muscle pains.
    3. Type 3 - mildest form of the disease.
    4. Type 4 - moderate levels of body pain and sleep problems
    5. Type 5 - most severe muscle weakness and predominance of gut problems
    6. Type 6 - associated with significant fatigue
    7. Type 7 - most severe form with high levels of pain, swollen glands and headaches.
     
  20. boolybooly

    boolybooly

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    That was the Kerr study, it later failed to prove these subtypes in the statistical analysis following on from the study because they could not predict the subtype of an individual based on the data and the derived signatures.

    My comment was really a rhetorical way of saying we cannot proceed until we have sorted this issue out. If Stanford have found a way to screen their subjects then this needs to be discussed in any write up so we can learn from any criteria they used to get consistency.

    For the field as a whole we need a molecular standard for distinguishing subtypes and not get ahead of ourselves because all that will happen is team A will say we found a thing and team B will say we tested our CFS group and found diddley, especially if team B are looking for govt or insurance funding.
     

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