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XMRV establishes an efficient spreading infection etc. in prostate carcinoma cells

Discussion in 'XMRV Research and Replication Studies' started by Dolphin, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Full title:
    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus establishes an efficient spreading infection and exhibits enhanced transcriptional activity in prostate carcinoma cells

    (Apologies if this has been posted before. I searched the forum but just saw a mention of its title, not the abstract or link to full text. I don't follow the XMRV forum that closely)

    Full free text at:
    http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/content/full/84/5/2556
    or
    http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/reprint/84/5/2556 (Pdf version)


  2. Advocate

    Advocate Senior Member

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    Hi Tom,

    I always have to look up LNCaP. For others in the same boat, this is from Wikipedia:

  3. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    I think this was mentioned on the other threads about the shortcomings of the UK papers. They didn't use LnCAP but Dr Mikovits said in one of the talks or papers that this should be used to grow the virus before looking for it? LnCAP sounds like a "must have" for any serious replication project.
  4. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Thanks Advocate and ukxmrv. I only have so much mental energy and I stopped studying biology at age 16 [I studied single honor Mathematics in college (in Trinity College Dublin, we didn't have the option of picking from other fields unlike say US colleges)] so probably will leave this thread to you and others.
  5. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member

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    This is a very important paper. I think some of the studies that didn't find XMRV in prostrate cancer patients didn't use this cell line.

    This is what always happens with a new discovery. The best way of working with an organism is gradually teased out.

    Mithriel
  6. CBS

    CBS Senior Member

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    For those who didn't have a chance to listen to the interview given by Dr. Goff at the recent CROI conference (http://blip.tv/file/3242252), I was very impressed with Dr. Goff's careful description of the work and his 35 years of studying this retrovirus in the lab. He was careful to say that there is a lot to be learned as they know so little about how XMRV behaves in humans and whether or not it plays a role in human disease (more knowledge about how it behaves in a petri dish - which is a good thing).

    In the face of all that caution, it is encouraging to know that Dr. Goff is in the process of conducting (or least preparing to conduct - I don't know if data collection has started) a study of XMRV in patients with CFS. He's a good person to have interested in XMRV and a possible link to CFS.

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