Julie Rehmeyer's 'Through the Shadowlands'
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Will fixing Hypometabolic state also fix cognition problems?

Discussion in 'Cognition' started by AdamS, Apr 4, 2017.

  1. AdamS

    AdamS Senior Member

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    I've just been looking at this article and it got me thinking...https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2016/07/25/chronic-fatigue-syndrome-brain-under-functioning/

    Will the amazing work that Davis, Naviaux, Fluge & Mella etc are doing also help with the cognitive issues that debilitate many of us? E.g Information processing, executive functioning, ability to initiate tasks without effort.

    This is one of the things that I find most debilitating, particularly because it makes it hard to socialise, work or concentrate on anything for very long.

    All input welcome! :)
     
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  2. Cheesus

    Cheesus Senior Member

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    Theoretically yes. There is no evidence of permanent neurological damage in ME patients. If they can identify the pathophysiology of the disease and subsequent treatment methods, cognitive dysfunction would hopefully be reversed.
     
  3. AdamS

    AdamS Senior Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I think i'm of the same opinion too. I noticed a few weeks ago that I randomly started to get a bit more energy and amazingly my drive to do/initiate normal things suddenly re-emerged as if it had just been hidden or in hibernation...I managed to mow the lawn one day, valet my car the next, I even pictured myself back at work for a brief moment...2 weeks later I crashed really bad after trying to do aerobic exercise at the gym...but still, it proved to me that the damage might be reversible at least to an extent!
     
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  4. Cheesus

    Cheesus Senior Member

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    @AdamS

    Yes, absolutely. As you alluded to, the likely ability for the disease process to reverse extends beyond the neurological components and potentially applies to the disease as a whole. There is yet to be found any structural damage to ME patients, and current hypotheses point to a dysfunctional metabolic or immunological mechanism that needs to be reset. As such, I think there is absolutely potential that most if not all of us to make full recoveries.
     
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  5. AdamS

    AdamS Senior Member

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    That's the sort of stuff I like to hear! Fingers crossed.
     
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  6. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois Prairie ❀❤✿Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ✿❤❀

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    The brain is an energy hog. It uses something like 20% of the body's energy. When there is more energy, the brain will function better. At least that is my hope.
     
  7. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Will fixing hypometabolic state also fix cognition problems?

    I expect and hope so. :thumbsup:
     
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  8. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    You mean aside from the loss of white and grey matter, and some brain remodeling? What we do have is some anecdotal evidence of full cognitive function after any kind of remission, even temporary. Of course once the symptoms return so does the cognitive dysfunction. We also know that some patients with some treatments have temporary improvements in cognitive function. What treatments? I think its all over the place, its about which treatments match the patient, there is nothing reliable.
     
  9. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Its more than just energy. The metabolomics findings go to key molecular pathways, and not just energy pathways. Neurological function is complex, if many of the metabolites needed are extremely low then its no surprise that neurological function is impaired. We need to fix both the energy state and the metabolite state. Of course fixing one might fix the other, but this is only speculation at this point.
     
  10. Cheesus

    Cheesus Senior Member

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    @alex3619

    I was under the impression that white and grey matter can fluctuate quite considerably, and if you lose it you can rebuild it?

    I am talking here about permanent damage.
     
  11. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    We do not know if the damage to the white and grey matter is reversible. In any case it takes a lot of time. There is also the brain remodeling, which in theory is fully reversible.

    We simply do not know what is permanent or not, or what takes years to recover from or not. Its all speculation.

    Grey matter loss does not appear to be fully recoverable. White matter takes a long time to recover. I suspect it sometimes does not result in full recovery of the white matter, no matter how much rehab you do.

    What we do know is that there is some anecdotal evidence that brain lesions are not permanent in ME. The lesions appear, disappear, reappear, in evidence going back to the Incline Village patient MRIs.
     
  12. Wishful

    Wishful Senior Member

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    In another thread, people have mentioned having transient remissions. I've had those (lasting hours) when I felt completely healthy again, clear-minded and energetic. To me that means that this is a reversible disorder rather than a degenerative one. I believe that there can be a simple treatment that will restore most if not all function. It's just a matter of finding the correct molecule....okay, and delivering it to the proper locations.
     
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  13. Alvin2

    Alvin2 Senior Member

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    Pyruvate dehydrogenase inactivity would prevent production of acetyl coenzyme A. Acetyl coenzyme A is required to produce acetylcholine. Lack of acetylcholine can cause a plethora of symptoms from difficulties in concentration, sleep problems and a whole host of other neurological symptoms. Hence if the pyruvate dehydrogenase blocking theory is correct then restoration of normal energy production will reverse he acetylcholine deficit. Now if acetylcholine being low is the culprit will extended time with it lowered have caused any damage, nobody knows. BTW acetylcarnitine may be able to increase acetylcholine levels in the brain and personally it makes am measurable difference.
     
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  14. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    how do you stimulate production of acetyl coenzyme A?
     
  15. Alvin2

    Alvin2 Senior Member

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    Thats the million dollar question, however stimulating may not do much good if something is turning off its synthesis, it may be like adding gasoline to a car with a dead starter, it won't make it run.
    I'm not the expert in this area though so perhaps someone who is can give a better answer
     
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  16. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    @Alvin2

    totally sensible.... I vaguely remember reading that astaxanthin may increase (directly? indirectly?) acetyl coenzyme A but I just did a quick look and couldn't find anything.... Astaxanthin helps me sometimes w inflammation & cognition
     

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