Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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"Why does stigma still surround ME?" (May 13, 2014)

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by Dolphin, Apr 7, 2015.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Start: "Why does stigma still surround ME? Because doctors believe it's all about deconditioning"

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    http://limitedcapability.blogspot.com/2014/05/why-does-stigma-still-surround-me.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2015
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  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Deconditioning is not, I think, the main thing. I think we will face issues even without deconditioning. In any case the deconditioning model has been disproved, but too many do not read the science. Psychogenic proponents have this bad habit of just moving to a new unproved theory when the old one is disproved.
     
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  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I think believing deconditioning, and the related idea that patients' disability can be overcome by them just doing more, is a big problem with doctors not taking the condition seriously and not being fully supportive of patients.

    Anyway, I'd encourage people to read the blog and read what the writer has to say.
     
    mango likes this.
  4. Sparrow

    Sparrow Senior Member

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    I read an article recently about a study on misinformation. It seems that the more times people hear a theory, the more they believe it to be true (or at least, possibly true). It seems more and more credible to them every time they hear about it.

    The catch is that hearing about something will make people believe it's credible even what they're hearing is an argument against it.

    For example, telling someone that it's a myth that you can't grow real tulips in North America is more likely to make them believe that you can't grow real tulips in North America. ...Despite the fact that they whole point of that statement was to try to say that's a myth (which it is...since I just made it up).

    At any rate, I found the research around these things fascinating, and very relevant to our cause.

    According to the current research, the less we say about any mental/deconditioning theories, the better. According to the research, the best way to help people believe that these theories aren't credible is to never mention them at all, and to instead just talk a lot about the biological nature of the illness (which I don't mean as a critique at all of the article writer, or anyone discussing it here - just wanted to mention in case it's helpful information in deciding how we interact with the outside world).

    ...Now if only we could get certain British doctors to keep their mouth shut about them as well...
     
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