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Why Doctors Often Find it Difficult to Diagnose and Treat Tinnitus Study

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by barbc56, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Recently, I've noticed several posts here on PR where tinnitus was mentioned. By coincidence, I ran across the following article. I also have tinnitus. It's fairly loud, but have learned to pretty much ignore it.

    I can imagine how tortuous it would be not to be able to block it.
    http://www.esbtrib.com/2015/04/26/1...-it-difficult-to-diagnose-and-treat-tinnitus/

    Barb
     
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  2. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    After some years of tortuous tinnitus, it became evident it was linked to adrenals. If ever it returns beyond a gentle hiss, I now know I need to look at what's stressing adrenals.
     
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  3. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Mine cleary was associated with the infection/inflammation. With overall improvement it disappeared and has not come back yet.
     
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  4. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

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    Cool way to do a study. They should use such techniques more often.

    I can reduce tinnitus by avoiding excitotoxins. Can't get rid of it altogether.
     
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  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    A Dutch woman recently got legal euthanasia for it. Her tinnitus had started out mild, but progressed to being very severe over several years, until it became constant and unbearable.

    Somewhat ironically, she had been a BPS-type practitioner for stress-related issues, though not overtly for CFS.
     
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  6. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    How horrible that the Dutch woman's case was so unbearable that she felt like she had to choose euthanasia!

    I have a mild case, which really only bothers me at night. I deal with it by using earplugs and a white noise machine.
     
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  7. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    Wow. What a sad story.

    A long time ago I met a military veteran whose hearing was severely damaged by artillery. The doctors told him maybe they could stop the ringing with surgery intended to make him deaf. The kicker was that after the surgery, the tinnitus could still remain. He opted to skip the surgery and treat the tinnitus with alcohol.

    Today I have pulsating tinnitus. In a way it's kinda entertaining. I can take my pulse by listening - no fingers or wrist required.
     
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  8. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Yep.
     
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  9. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Hoarder of biscuits

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    Same here. When I tell doctors I can take my pulse without using my hands they don't seem to get it. When I hold up my hand and start snapping my fingers in rhythm to my pulse, that visual aid seems to get the point across.

    I don't find it entertaining at all. It keeps me awake at night and is the first thing I hear in the morning. I also have a pounding heartbeat and between that and the tinnitus I'm miserable. I take atenolol to keep the two in check and that in itself is one miserable drug that keeps me even more fatigued.

    I've had hearing tests and cardiac tests that don't show anything wrong. I suspect adrenal issues too.
     
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  10. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    How could they not understand the concept? I'm constantly dismayed by the inability of doctors to comprehend what patients are telling them. No doctor has ever expressed the slightest interest in investigating or treating my tinnitus - because it can't be measured with a blood test?

    Of course, they have never investigated or attempted to treat most of my symptoms...
     
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  11. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    @jimells

    The article is saying that tinnitus is a difficult condition to treat.

    Whether doctors are dismissive of this condition or dismissive of our symptoms is a different issue. An issue that may be valid, but not the subject of the article.

    I've had dismissive doctors and doctors who are not but that's my experience.

    Barb
     
  12. zzz

    zzz Senior Member

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    The fact that the study found that tinnitus affected large regions of the brain is consistent with the theories of Dr. Montoya and others that microglial inflammation across the brain plays a crucial role in causing the symptoms of ME/CFS.

    Dr. Montoya, of course, has been studying the effect of Valcyte on ME/CFS patients for many years, and has seen its anti-inflammatory properties that have been so helpful for so many people. However, in addition to being a microglial inhibitor, Valcyte also appears to be an NMDA agonist (direct or indirect) at standards doses, which results in the inflammatory symptoms in so many people who get sick while taking it. The inflammatory properties of Valcyte can lead to tinnitus (among other things), and this tinnitus can be very severe in some people.

    Yet at very low doses, the anti-inflammatory properties of Valcyte predominate over the inflammatory properties. This means that low dose Valcyte can be used to cure the neurological problems that standard dose Valcyte (or ME/CFS in general) causes. Although I never took Valcyte at a dose that was high enough to cause tinnitus for me, I have had severe tinnitus for many years, and I have found that a dose of 14 mg/day (1/32nd of a tablet) of Valcyte is the best treatment for tinnitus that I have ever found. By itself, it has reduced my tinnitus to almost undetectable levels, and has allowed me to take other medications that I previously couldn't take because of their tinnitus-producing effects.

    Low dose Valcyte has also been found to reverse the side effects of standard dose Valcyte in myself and others. For example, both vertigo and peripheral neuropathy that were induced by standard dose Valcyte were eliminated by low dose Valcyte. This is due to the multiple modes of action of Valcyte.

    As Dr. Montoya has found, Valcyte has strong immunomodulatory effects, and I have personally noticed that this has allowed Valcyte to be effective against a wide range of viruses. Since this effect is mediated by the immune system, and is not a direct effect of Valcyte on viruses, using a low dose of Valcyte does not risk creating treatment-resistant strains of viruses. Furthermore, pulsing low dose Valcyte (e.g., using it five days a week) appears to increase not only its immunomodulatory properties, but also its neurological benefits as well, as the anti-inflammatory properties tend to be longer lasting than the inflammatory ones, and regular breaks in Valcyte dosing appear to prevent the inflammatory effects from building up.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2015
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  13. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    I have this too, intermittently. For years I thought it was normal and that everyone could hear their pulse in their head.
     
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  14. GhostGum

    GhostGum Senior Member

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    I am curious, but could she not have decided to become deaf instead? Through surgery. I find it hard to believe this option had not been explored though, but surely tinnitus does not remain with complete deafness?
     
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  15. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    It might be because of the following, but I'm not positive about this.

    Now I'm curious if this could be a treatment. I'll have to do some digging.

    Thanks.

    Barb
     
  16. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Found this article discussing myths about tinnitus. From what I've read it depends on the source of the tinnitus.

    http://www.hearinglink.org/tinnitus/myths

    Barb
     
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  17. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    @barbc56 there was a link on the page that you posted that led me to this information
    I don't know how neurofeedback works. It sounds a bit dodgy...
     
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  18. Andielyn

    Andielyn Senior Member

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    Wow, this is all very fascinating. I also have tinnitus, I'd say moderate. I also have intermittent pulsating tinnitus and can take my pulse rate. My doctor has never really offered any help for me. (As a note, I am not diagnosed, a rather new member with many symptoms.--I did not know tinnitus was associated.) ~Andielyn
     
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  19. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    It's even more difficult to diagnose and treat when one doesn't even try.

    I have a sister with bad tinnitus. She uses some kind of hearing aids to counter it. She has a lot more money than I do, so the doctors were willing to try to help. Since I'm living (if one can call it that) on disability, they don't bother to try.
     
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  20. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Yeah, it is. I think the same thing of biofeedback. Any changes don't always last in the long term. However, I might be a bit prejudiced as I had biofeedback and it didn't work.

    Thanks for finding that.

    Barb
     
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