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Which test is considered more accurate measuring Aluminum toxicity?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Peyt, Jul 8, 2016.

  1. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi,
    I have a hair test which shows my Aluminum as relatively high and a Toxic Metals Urine test which shows my Aluminum as normal to low. I am wondering which one is considered more accurate for the purpose of measuring the Aluminum toxicity??
     
  2. aaron_c

    aaron_c Senior Member

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    According to Andrew Hall Cutler in Hair Test Interpretation: Finding Hidden toxicities hair mineral analysis should accurately reflect body burden, unlike blood and urine levels.

    Was your test a provoked (meaning you took a chelation agent) test? If so, I don't think those were the tests he was referring to.
     
  3. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi aaron_c, thanks for your reply.
    My hair test was by Doctor's Data. It's called "Toxic and Essential Elements, Hair"
    Is this an acceptable test for getting accurate results?
    Note: my Urine test was also from DD
     
  4. aaron_c

    aaron_c Senior Member

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    Yes Doctor's Data should be fine.

    I should have written "Was your urine test provoked?" Did you take a chelation agent before collecting your urine?
     
  5. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    No it was not.
    Do you think Malic Acid would help in my case? I am real tempted to try it. I do have a case of mild none alcoholic fatty liver confirmed by ultra sound.
     
  6. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Do you have access to high silica water (Fiji/Volvic)? If it tastes wonderful to you, it can help with getting rid of Aluminum.
     
  7. aaron_c

    aaron_c Senior Member

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    What made you think of malic acid? I take it for my "ammonia problems" (or what I now think of as "asymmetric dimethyl arginine problems"), but I am not actually sure how it works. Maybe by increasing NADPH--but NADPH does so many things that I can't be sure.

    Like @Gondwanaland wrote, I'd second some kind of silica supplement. I take silica from bamboo--although watch out for silica from horsetail (the other main plant-based source) as horsetail can inhibit the thyroid somehow. I'm not sure that silica will pull aluminum from your body all that well (maybe it will, I just don't know) but I am under the impression that it will bind to aluminum in water and form some kind of compound that is easily excreted or else not absorbed. Weirdly, water treatment plants apply this backwards by using aluminum to remove silt from the water. If your water comes from a municipal source, you might be able to check on how much aluminum is in your water on a government website.
     
  8. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    There are many links on the internet talking about Malic Acid and Aluminum.
    Here is one: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3391623
     
    Gondwanaland and aaron_c like this.
  9. aaron_c

    aaron_c Senior Member

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    Thanks @Peyt, I was not aware of that!
     

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