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WHAT DOES THIS POSITIVE EFFECT OF PREDNISONE MEAN?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by TedBakerBoy, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    Hi forum. I've recently started a low dose experiment with prednisone 5mg 3 times per week, Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Constant fatigue, brain fog the usual led me to this. So far i feel cured already, brain fog has gone energy levels are up no anxiety depression the lot has gone?!! What has this done to me? I'm shocked with the results, i'm going to keep going on as this is the first time in years i have felt normal again. What is going on!!!?
     
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  2. undiagnosed

    undiagnosed Senior Member

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    Here's another thread on this subject in case you didn't see it.
     
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  3. Chocolove

    Chocolove Tournament of the Phoenix - Rise Again

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    WARNING prednisone is extremely dangerous

    From: http://www.medicinenet.com/prednisone/page2.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2017
    slysaint and starlighter like this.
  4. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    I never tried any steroid in my life until now, is 5mg considered dangerous?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2017
  5. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    Prednisone needs to be managed by an M.D. as, while you may feel better, there are other things to consider and you could end up in a worse situation--so please talk to your doctor about your responses.
     
    Paralee, Tammy, Izola and 5 others like this.
  6. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    The thing is the nhs Gps won't give these things out ever
     
  7. Chocolove

    Chocolove Tournament of the Phoenix - Rise Again

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    https://www.drugs.com/drug-interactions/prednisone.html


    Prednisone side effects:
    https://www.drugs.com/sfx/prednisone-side-effects.html
     
    slysaint likes this.
  8. JES

    JES Senior Member

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    Below is one CFS sufferers experience with prednisone. I'm not surprised it helped shot-term, but seems long-term is not very sensible to use:

    Prednisone greatly helped my CFS/ME for a few months. My fatigue, brainfog, muscle weakness, lymph node soreness and hair loss got almost fully better, I did not really crash at all and my chronic fever, urticaria and seborrhea were gone, and overall my skin got better (I had some acne on my back which seemed to get permanently a lot better). My IBS, tachycardia, chronic congestion, headaches/migraines, urinary frequency and sleep problems did not improve. I only got one viral infection during the treatment and I think one bacterial one, which is less than I usually get. The side effects I had were mild, some joint aches in the beginning. I gained a few kilos of weight and my face got rounder. That went away soon after the discontinuation, but I still have a paunch despite being thin. However the taper was a nightmare - it lasted for eight months and caused e.g. lethargy, dyspnea, severe hunger pangs that were impossible to eradicate by eating, loss of appetite, stomach cramps, nausea, hair loss, fever, muscle cramps, joint aches and morning headaches (for a "normal" person a taper lasting a few months should have been enough and not nearly as horrible). On the good side, my chronic fever and the accompanying cold intolerance seemed have improved permanently.
     
  9. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Cortisol based steroids were a standard treatment back in the 70s. The results were so dire that they are almost never used now. However these were at immunosuppressive doses. Supplementary doses should not be confused with immunuosuppressive doses, and the side effects are probably much less, if any. Small doses of cortisol derived drugs are a standard treatment for CFS and ME. Timing is important too, as we can have too much cortisol at some times of the day, with too little at others.
     
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  10. trails

    trails Senior Member

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    About two months ago, during a follow-up appointment with my sleep specialist, the doctor noted that many of my symptoms sounded to him like inflammation. Despite the fact that previous inflammation blood test results were negative, he prescribed me prednisone.

    He started me at 20mg/day for two weeks, then 10 mg/day thereafter. For the first time battling this illness, the positive effect on my symptoms was nothing short of amazing. Within 3 or 4 days, I experienced breathtaking improvements in the following areas: PEM, neck/upper back pain, pressure at base of skull, fatigue, muscle weakness, brain fog, muscle tightness around the eyes, joint pain, dizziness, clumsiness, etc.

    That’s not to say that all of these symptoms were completely eradicated, though some were. Additionally, some of my symptoms were not improved in any way (e.g., bowel issues). However, the overall improvement in my condition has felt like a new lease on life.

    So, I’ve now been taking the prednisone for two months. As far as I can tell, the doctor intends to keep me on it indefinitely so long as it continues to provide a positive and significant effect.

    I am aware of the dangers associated with the drug and will have to make my own decision soon as to whether or not to continue. I can honestly tell you, though, that I will be hard-pressed to easily give up these improvements .

    I’ve waited two months to share this with you all to ensure that the improvements didn’t dissipate over time. I am aware that others (in other threads) have also shared their experiences with prednisone. As such, consider this testimony as “another country heard from”.
     
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  11. erin

    erin Senior Member

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    @TedBakerBoy, I was given 1g (huge dose) Prednisone injection in december 2015 due to herniated disc on my neck. I felt great afterwards as if I didn't have ME anymore. The effect lasted 3 months I went back for more but the dr said no way he would put me on cortisol. He said "cortisone is double edged sword". So back to horrible fatigue with more symptoms added now. I was requested a cortisol test but I was not given one and waiting for an endocrinology appointment.
     
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  12. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    Hi erin, My Gp is useless in Glasgow they prescribed me Amitripyline, Prozac and Propranalol for CFS, i have no choice than to buy my meds online from Goldpharma.com. I'm also considering a consultation with Dr Chaudhury as i have some neuro problems that still have not been diagnosed by the nhs.
     
    erin likes this.
  13. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    Are you going to stay on the medication long term?
     
  14. trails

    trails Senior Member

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    At this point, I'm taking it month-by-month. I just ordered another month's worth of pills, so will re-evaluate after those are gone. That will have been a total of 90 days on the medication. As stated earlier, unless I become aware of something more dire than an increased risk (or even likelihood) of developing osteoporosis, I'm not sure I'm willing to give up these improvements.
     
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  15. Chocolove

    Chocolove Tournament of the Phoenix - Rise Again

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    @TedBakerBoy The energy and good feeling you get from prednisone I have experienced. Here is my amalgam of personal experience, research and hyposthesis.

    The adrenal gland produces cortisol a corticosteroid hormone to turn down the immune system when one is getting better from an illness. Like the army commander (adrenal glands) gets the word that the enemy has fallen, thus fighting should cease and resources be directed elsewhere and so they produce cortisol to accomplish this.

    You may notice that when you become ill you feel tired, weak and often lose your appetite. The signal which causes this is preventing you from over expending your resources when they are needed to fight infection for survival.

    When your adrenals get the all clear, they produce the corticosteroid which reverses the situation - now you feel energy, hunger and optimism even euphoric confidence. As your body is no longer fighting an infectious enemy, your body gets the message it is now ok to hunt, fight, and eat.... as your immune system activity drops.

    So, by taking a corticosteroid you are overriding your body's decision and sending the message for the immune system not to fight. Clearly it might not be a good idea to send that message.

    If for example, you are having a chronic reaction like asthma to mold in your home that you don't know about, you may initially feel better upon taking corticosteroids. But the mold is still there and you should be getting rid of it, or getting a new home because that is an enemy you don't want in your body. So taking a corticosteroid can send a false message, adding further problems and allowing the original problem to snowball. But the doctors don't usually tell you to look for mold or another problem, they just give out the corticosteroids.

    In my situation - I had an extremely violent infection and afterwards, my immune system did not turn off but remained hyperactive to the point of hives and throat swelling almost shut. After months of seeing different doctors I finally ended up on corticosteroids which calmed my immune system. That was an emergency situation and the short term use of corticosteroids saved my life. My ANA levels, which had gone very high returned to normal. They should have tapered me off the steroids within a couple of weeks to see if my body had restored normal function. But the doctor never tried to take me off the steroids, which was a huge mistake that caused much serious damage to me, nearly costing me my adrenal function which you need to live.

    Since corticosteroids lower your immune function thus I became susceptible to all diseases and I caught them, could barely recover, and became chronically ill in a downward spiral. I finally managed to get off the corticosteroids - which is a major feat not easily done. At least I am alive to tell you, there are many that are not so lucky.

    Later, trying to figure out why my immune system went haywire, I later discovered that I was largely deficient in vitamin A. Having corrected that deficiency, I have found that my immune system has normalized.

    Pharmaceutical corticosteroids like prednisone have a longer half life in the body than the natural cortisol your body produces. That interrupts the negative feedback system that the HPA axis operates on. Since the system no longer gets the message to tell the adrenals to produce the adrenals gradually atrophy and there is no guarantee that function will recover.

    So while corticosteroids may make you feel better it often does not solve the real problem but makes things worse.
     
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  16. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    Sound's great, The nhs won't prescribe me them and said there is no treatment for CFS so i ordered on Goldpharma,
     
  17. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    Assuming you have low cortisol levels and your adrenal glands are no longer producing from high levels of stress throughout the years this would be a good treatment? We're talking only 5mg three times per week, Not 60/80mg.
     
    stridor likes this.
  18. TedBakerBoy

    TedBakerBoy

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    Awesome!!! Can you list your symptoms before the medication use?
     
  19. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    There is a very good reason why NHS doctors do not prescribe prednisolone for conditions where it has no proven LONG TERM benefit. When I first came in to medicine in 1970 the medical profession were trying to cope with the catastrophe of widespread use of steroids in the 1950s and 1960s. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis were dying of diabetes, spinal fractures, ischaemic legs needing amputation and so on and the survivors had cataracts and muscle weakness and obesity.

    If you think an NHS doctor is useless because they do not prescribe steroids, I would suggest thinking again. Unless you are over 60 5mg three times a week is already taking out a loan your body may never be able to repay.
     
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  20. Binkie4

    Binkie4 Senior Member

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    @Jonathan Edwards- could I ask the significance of age in the prescription of steroids. I am 69, and you commented that unless you are " over 65 5 mg three times a week is taking out a loan your body may never be able to repay".

    I understand my local CFS service immunologist is willing to prescribe me low doses of hydrocortisone. My GP isn't keen but would probably agree if pushed. I haven't wanted to do this because of dependency issues when prescribed high doses of natural progesterone ( a precursor on the steroid pathway I understand) for PMS in the late 70s: it took years to reduce/ almost eliminate the dose. But if hydrocortisone is safe at low doses in the older patient, I could maybe reconsider.

    Could you elaborate a little about the over 65 patient? Would be wonderful to get a 10-20% increase in functionality.
     

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