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What CBT for other chronic diseases is like

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by WillowJ, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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    So I was looking through the Oxford books for Lenny Jason's new book listing, and I found a book on CBT for chronic and terminal illnesses. I clicked through to see what it was like. Not at all like what they offer for us. I can see how this could be useful as an adjunct therapy, particularly for a newer patient or someone who didn't have a support group.

    http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/gener...tionerClientGuides/?view=usa&ci=9780195341638

    (I added paragraph breaks)
     
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  2. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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    There's also this:
    http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/gener...tionerClientGuides/?view=usa&ci=9780195341645

    Rather than figuring social support is enabling the illness as the (bio) psychosocial school illogically concludes for us, it is normally suggested to strengthen it. This seems a much wiser course of action. ;)
     
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  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    The pattern is simple, the psychobabblers put their content into somebody elses label then pretend its the same thing.

    I still think traditional CBT is useful, but not the version promoted for ME.
     
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  4. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    I've never had CBT specifically for ME i.e. a course, but I have had plenty of counselling over the years that employed CBT and I participated in a long course of Mindfulness and CBT as part of a group.

    The above sounds very much like my own experiences of CBT and of the experiences I do hear from others engaged locally with our ME Services.

    Acceptance, adjustment, management. That's what it should be about and there's no general reason why we shouldn't be engaged with others who have different long-term conditions in this regard, although there is a case for specialists to help us through the hurdles explicit to ME.

    Thanks Willow

    This was posted on another forum I happened to notice this morning:

    CBT helps adjustment to MS

    http://www.mssociety.org.uk/ms-news/2012/07/cbt-helps-adjustment-ms

    I haven't read it but can guess the content as I know that people with MS who have received professional CBT intervention and counselling have concurred when I asked them.

    Edit:

    Regardless of my comment - the above link also refers to a RCT carried out independently by the MS Society. It might be worth reviewing and comparing to similar studies for our own condition.
     
  5. Bob

    Bob

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    It does look better than what they provide to us, but I still have worries about how CBT is applied to terminal illnesses.
    It says that they aim to reduce depression, anxiety and anger.
    And I'd like to know the details of how they go about that before I could judge the therapy.
    Anger, anxiety and depression can be part of an adjustment process.
    Obviously, if they become too severe or too prolonged, then they are not helpful.
    But all of these emotions help us to adjust to new situations, and to face up to new realities.
    So if CBT is telling people that their emotions are harmful, or unwarranted, then I think they could be counter-productive.
    Also, a bad therapist could do more harm than good.
    The devil is in the detail, as always.
     
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  6. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    Again in my experience of counselling and even the mindfulness involving CBT, allowing one's emotions to flow as it were, was encouraged. Gods the stuff I needed to get off my chest! And to be able to do so with someone detached and independent from my family and friends was for me very helpful.

    Take your point though Bob about terminal illnesses. I wonder though, do e.g. Macmillan Nurses employ CBT or something similar? I have certainly got the impression over the years that 'CBT' outside of a research trial involving a manual for example - is not something rigorously applied. If that makes sense?

    It has long been my thought as to just how rigorously the e.g. PACE Manual for CBT is adhered to in the real world. I know you get 'bad therapists' who have seemed to apply (in the case I am thinking of) the FINE manual to patients with ME, but I have ditched some therapists I thought were not up to the job.

    I don't know. It's not an easy one to quantify. Inside a the research it would seem that e.g. PACE tailored CBT specifically and unfairly towards ME, but in my experience the CBT I received or rather the professionals generally applying it - appeared more in line with that spoken of for MS (above) than anything I have heard relating specifically to ME a la PACE/Wessley/White.

    Maybe it's all about interpretation, professionalism and application to individuals?
     
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  7. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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  8. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    Began reading this earlier today, and will finish it tonight. It had been posted on IiME Facebook and was not well received by the person who posted it. I am trying to be more circumspect but we shall see.

    Not sure when it was published, but it affords some insight perhaps into the situation relating to CBT and our condition: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/projects/cfs/health/index.aspx Might be interesting to compare the approaches.

    Here's the author: http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/academic/lifesciences/ad/psych/psychstaff/vincentdeary/
     

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