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Vitamin D3 as an anti-viral?

Discussion in 'Antivirals, Antibiotics and Immune Modulators' started by tiredallday, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. tiredallday

    tiredallday

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    I have been taking 10,000 units a day of vitamin D3 for the past ten years, which has eliminated my getting colds and flu. But sometimes when I feel like I am coming down with a cold or flu, I take 50,000 units (usually in the evening) and the next morning I feel fine. Since coming down with CFS, I have been wondering about using an extended course of 50,000 units a day as an anti-viral instead of the usual prescription anti-virals.

    Has anyone who has been diagnosed with a viral infection tried this, how much did you take, and what has been the result?
     
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  2. MartinDH

    MartinDH Senior Member

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    D3 is known to regulate the immune system. But there is also a study that suggests it works as an antiviral.
     
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  3. Jill

    Jill Senior Member

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    Maybe d3 is why I feel better in summer . We certainly need way more than we get in winter . I enjoyed Ivor Cummins on YouTube on the topic . The v low rda's are shocking . It's such an important hormone ( not a vitamin at all ) . It is involved in cholesterol synthethis and many othe vital cell functions
     
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  4. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    If you take that much vitamin D3 you have to regularly test serum calcium and 25(OH)D. Also get tested for PTH (Parathyroid hormone). Vitamin Ds toxic effects are mediated by taking it together with ample Magnesium, preformed vitamin A and K2.

    (http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2009/04/)
     
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  5. eric_gladiator

    eric_gladiator Senior Member

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    I've always heard good things about d3 that even work for our joints, but my doctor suggests not taking it too much that can be harmful. I take 20,000 a day
     
  6. rodgergrummidge

    rodgergrummidge

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    Vitamin D is toxic at high doses. Are you really taking 10,000U+ a day? Perhaps it was a typo?

    Many water-soluble vitamins (eg Vit C) can be taken at high doses fairly safely and the excess is eliminated relatively harmlessly in the urine. However, fat-soluble vitamins such as Vitamin D accumulate in the body and so are associated with significant toxicities. While Vitamin D is called a vitamin, it functions more like a hormone with diverse physiological effects in many tissues. Thus, mega-dosing with vitamin D is similar in many respects to taking large amounts of a hormone and can lead to significant toxicities.

    The recommended daily intake of Vitamin D varies depending on the agency, but usually its around 600 IU/day. A doctor may prescribe higher amounts in cases of vitamin D deficiency. However in such cases the doc would normally monitor levels in the blood to avoid prolonged 'over-dosing'. Toxicities from 10000U+ per day of Vitamin D include hypercalcemia that can lead to serious health issues including the calcification of arteries and kidney tubules. Very high vitamin D intakes of 10000U+ per day are also associated with the loss of bone density which can lead to osteoporosis and bone fractures. Such Vitamin D toxicities usually only arise with prolonged mega-dosing and so they are are generally quite rare. However, prolonged dosing of 10000U+ per day in some cases could lead to toxicities which may only become apparent once a serious health event has occurred (eg. a bone fracture, kidney stone or cardiovascular event). Because vitamin D accumulates to high levels in tissues, returning to normal 'safe' vitamin D levels can take some time after discontinuing the supplement.

    Perhaps confirm with your doc or pharmacist which doses of Vit D you might require. Any doubts, vit D levels can easily be measured in the blood.

    Rodger
     
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  7. eric_gladiator

    eric_gladiator Senior Member

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  8. keenly

    keenly Senior Member

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    Sun not supplements
     
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  9. pamojja

    pamojja Senior Member

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    If you don't aim at therapeutic 25(OH)D serum levels, then yes. I only once discontinued D3 supplements because I went for 6 weeks at a tropical beach, where I stayed 2 times about 2 hours everyday in the sun. Came back and my 25(OH)D meassured 27 ng/ml only. At home in Central Europe I don't get as much sun during a whole year as during these 6 weeks on the beach. Therefore for me it's clearly: Sun and supplements.

    However, when aiming at therapeutic levels always also check them regularly. Illness can deplete it fast, conversely it can build up over time and less supplementation might be needed at one point for equal levels.
     
  10. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    @rodgergrummidge it is always best to monitor vitamin D levels. Mine has repeatedly dropped to unacceptable levels if I'm NOT taking 10,000IUs a day. This seems to be due to my genetics. (My mother's shin bones have a pronounced curve due to rickets - the Cleveland Clinic put her on 50,000IUs.)

    Toxicity can be an issue for some folks, but for the most part 600IUs is laughably inadequate. I've made a point of asking people what their vitamin D levels are around here in Seattle, and no one's is over 25 without supplementation of at least 4,000IUs a day.
     
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  11. rodgergrummidge

    rodgergrummidge

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    Its great you are closely monitoring your Vitamin D @Learner1 It sounds like your case (with a genetic issue in your family) would be the exception and may require 10000IU/day to maintain >30ng/ml 25(OH)D in your blood. But for most, the long-term dosage of +10000IU/day could lead to serious health problems.

    Below is a summary from a New England Journal of Med article on treating Vitamin D deficiencies (N Engl J Med. 2007;357(3):266–281).

    Many experts would recommend correcting vitamin D deficiency with 50,000 IU capsule of vitamin D2 weekly for 8 weeks, followed by either 50,000 IU of vitamin D2 every 2 to 4 weeks or by 1000 IU to 2000 IU of vitamin D3 daily. The dose required to achieve and maintain >30ng/ml of 25(OH)D depends on the starting level, with roughly 100 IU of additional daily oral vitamin D3 required to raise the serum 25(OH)D level by 1ng/ml. Keep in mind that it takes approximately 3 months to achieve a steady state once supplementation is started, so 25(OH)D should be closely monitored and adjusted every 3 months until serum levels enter the normal range. Individual responses can vary and known risk factors for deficiency should be taken into account.
     
  12. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    From
    https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/how-much-vitamin-d-is-needed-to-achieve-optimal-levels/

     
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