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Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) Effects?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by joejack102, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. joejack102

    joejack102

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    Has anyone here taken Vitamin B2 Riboflavin? If so, how much did you take? What did you notice?

    Any side effects from high doses (e.g. 100mg)?
     
  2. rodgergrummidge

    rodgergrummidge

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    Yes, there have been many PR discussions about B2 and its potential in CFS

    Riboflavin is a water-soluble B vitamin (B2) that serves as a flavoprotein (FAD) precursor that is necessary for the activity of many enzymatic reactions involving fatty acid oxidation and the Krebs cycle. B2 has proven to be an important supplement for some people with mitochondrial diseases/disorders in which there are defects in either the Krebs cycle or oxidative phosphorylation.

    I am unaware of any contraindications or toxicities but others on PR may have more experience with B2 supplements. Several studies suggest that relatively high dosages up to 400 mg/d are well tolerated but dietitians should be able to advise of the exact dose ranges to use. The main side effects I am aware of are that very high doses may cause anorexia and/or nausea. Excess B2 is excreted in urine which turns very yellow.

    B2 is essential for essential for the activity of many enzymes including oxidases, reductases and dehydrogenases, many of which are responsible for energy production in the mitochondria. Thus, B2 deficiency or conditions where enzymes are unable to use B2 result in defects in mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids and branched chain amino acids. In some of these cases, B2 supplementation may be helpful.

    Iron metabolism is also affected by riboflavin deficiency. Riboflavin deficiency can result in decreased heme formation in red blood cells resulting in anemia.

    Folate metabolism is also affected by riboflavin deficiency. Decreased B2 levels can lead to inhibited MTHFR activity which decreases methylation, resulting in an increased risk of DNA damage.

    Glutathione reductase also requires B2. Riboflavin deficiency results in decreased FAD levels which leads to a reduction of glutathione reductase activity leading to reduced glutathione and so lower antioxidant levels.

    Given its low toxicity profile and importance in energy generation, oxidative stress and methylation, B2 is a vitamin supplement that has been tried by many with CFS including myself. For me, I didnt notice any clear benefit.

    But I would be very interested in the comments of anyone who has found benefit from B2, the doses used and the source of where they bought the supplement.

    hopefully this helps

    Rodger
     
  3. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    I take 290mg of Thorne Research riboflavin-5-phosphate daily for reasons mentioned above. I tested very low in it. I take a lot of B12 and B6 and the B2 is a cofactor.
     
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  4. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    I took riboflavine 400 mg in the morning but saw no special effect,
    however mito specialists recommend to cut the dose 50 mg morning + 50 mg evening.

    i will test this one next time, thank you :thumbsup:
     
  5. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    Look up - B2 I love you!
     
  6. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed

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    pattismith likes this.
  7. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

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    Even small amounts of B2 show up in my urine within two hours. Larger amounts lead to more frequent urination as my body tries to expel it. I'm wondering if this implies that I have problems utilizing it, or if I just don't need it.
     
  8. Oberon

    Oberon Senior Member

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    PatJ likes this.

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