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Visual Representations: ME/CFS/CFIDS/SEID/Etc.

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by Asa, Jun 22, 2015.

  1. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Please just say if there's a thread like this elsewhere--I looked but didn't find one. I thought it might be interesting to create/collect a visual history of how ME/CFS (in all its various labels) has been presented. So, here's an initial contribution: (Please share dates and please archive links, for example https://archive.org/web/.)

    (Edit & note: My thoughts were of actual visual (photos, drawings) images, but maybe written descriptions of what ME/CFS "looks like" could be included too? Would eventually too be nice to know where photos originated -- actual person with ME/CFS, or a stock image of someone who is "tired", etc. Any duplicate images?)

    Stockholm University KTS (CFS) Paper 2006.PNG

    https://web.archive.org/web/2015062...tal.org/smash/get/diva2:196979/FULLTEXT01.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
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  2. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Medscape: "20 More Rare and Unusual Psychiatric Syndromes" / Christoph U. Correll, MD; Bret S. Stetka, MD / July 10, 2014

    Text with photo: "Shenjing Shuairuo (Neuresthenia) Region Culture: China
    Shenjing shuairuo is a broad Chinese folk diagnosis characterized by fatigue, poor concentration, irritability, pain, and a variety of somatic complaints. Traditionally, it likely included a range of mental health disorders and accompanying somatic symptoms, which would meet today's DSM-IV criteria for a mood or anxiety disorder.[1,13] Across all cultures, it is not uncommon that mood disorders are expressed as somatizing -- rather than mental -- symptoms, partly to avoid the stigma often associated with mental disorders. This would fit with somatoform disorders such as conversion disorder or somatization disorder. The description of shenjing shuairuo would also fit chronic fatigue syndrome, which remains poorly understood. Image from Thinkstock"

    http://www.medscape.com/features/slideshow/culture-synd#15
     

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    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
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  3. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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  4. Battery Muncher

    Battery Muncher Senior Member

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    Very interesting idea for a thread!

    I don't have anything to contribute right now, but I'll keep it in mind.
     
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  5. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Suzanne O’Sullivan It’s All in your Head cover art: Cracked egg / bad egg: http://web.archive.org/web/20150624132539/http://www.amazon.co.uk/Its-All-Your-Head-Imaginary/dp/0701189266


    Elaine Showalter Hystories cover art: TV snow?: http://web.archive.org/save/http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hystories-Hysterical-Epidemics-Modern-Media/dp/0231104596

    Unidentified collage: http://web.archive.org/web/20150623173054/http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hystories-Hysterical-Epidemics-Modern-Culture/dp/0330354779

    Columbia University Press (CUP), generic: http://web.archive.org/web/20150623164055/http://cup.columbia.edu/book/hystories/9780231104593

    Hystories.PNG
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2015
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  6. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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  7. AaroninOregon

    AaroninOregon noob

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    Hippietown
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  8. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    http://web.archive.org/web/20140916155150/http://www.cdc.gov/Features/cfsawarenessday/ (Note laundry photo and peacefully sleeping woman)

    http://web.archive.org/web/20141006232415/http://www.cdc.gov/features/cfsawarenessday (Note laundry photo removed / ribbon added)

    http://web.archive.org/web/20141008132150/http://www.cdc.gov/features/cfsawarenessday/ (Note laundry photo reinstated / ribbon removed)

    http://web.archive.org/web/20150512072152/http://www.cdc.gov/features/cfsawarenessday/ (Note laundry photo and peacefully sleeping woman removed) / smiling patient with smiling doctor photo added, plus ribbon again)
     
  9. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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  10. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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  11. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    http://www.cdc.gov/media/subtopic/images.htm

    http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/home.asp

    A search in PHIL for "chronic fatigue syndrome" yields an old black and white photo of a man looking into a microscope. A search for "fatigue" yields images of microbes, rashes, diseased male/female genitalia, mouth ulcers (?), a woman standing in a driveway, petri dishes, and mice -- but no images of anything good or bad that could possibly represent ME/CFS or even chronic fatigue.

    I haven't looked at NLM yet, but the link is https://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/ihm/
     
  12. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    @Effi - Perfect - Thank you!
     
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  13. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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  14. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    I remember those - beautiful! Maybe my thoughts though were more about how the media represents us, government agencies, patients themselves, advocacy groups, etc. if that makes sense... what does a person with ME look like or how are they portrayed? :) Thank you for keeping images in mind and helping collect them here.
     
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  15. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Added thought - maybe just "humans" doesn't fully work either...since there's the cracked egg cover and a static tv cover... But maybe the light photo would work if it were on a book cover? I guess it was featured on Phoenix Rising's home page though and that's a sort of cover... I don't know! Maybe it does fit! :)
     
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  16. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    ME/CFS patients tend not too look ill, and even the severe case who are totally bedbound don't necessarily look bad, they just look as if they are in bed.

    So I am not sure what kind of visual images might illustrate a ME/CFS history. Possibly pictures of the places where ME/CFS outbreaks occurred.
     
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  17. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    Maybe I should have said I'm interested in the perception of ME patients -- which can include human or non-human imagery. The photos that people with ME -- or people who genuinely know something about ME -- choose to accompany an article/book/etc. on ME are often quite different than photos chosen by government and private media.

    Theoretically, if all the photos/images (and/or written physical descriptions of people with ME) which accompanied magazine/newspaper/online articles/posters/government info/books/lectures etc.on ME could be assembled (and arranged chronologically? by decades? by "camps"? across countries? by publication circulation numbers? by gender? by physical environment? by facial expression? by person vs inanimate object?), what would we see? When people write/talk about ME, what visual imagery do they choose to accompany their text/lecture?

    What images have been flashed at the collective these past decades when the word(s) ME/CFS/"ME/CFS"/CFIDS/PVFS/etc. appear?

    Hope that makes a bit more sense. I guess the idea isn't fully formed for me yet... :) Thanks for thinking about it though. If articles and such have used photos of places where outbreaks occurred, then I believe that fits.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015
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  18. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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  19. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    Just a loose thought that came up when I thought about the written words used to describe this illness over time: how would a word cloud of these words look like? (i.e. words that are used most look bigger). And how would it change over time, as the view on the illness changes?

    e.g.
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. Asa

    Asa Senior Member

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    I love it!! (Makes me think of the symbolism of storm clouds too. And seeing the words made me remember / think of blackout poetry too. That might (one day - someday) be fun/interesting to do with some of the medical texts - see what lexical surprises there might be.) The cloud visual's really good though (in my humble opinion). :)
     
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