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Vinegar for low stomach acid

Discussion in 'The Gut: De Meirleir & Maes; H2S; Leaky Gut' started by madietodd, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. madietodd

    madietodd Senior Member

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    Does anybody here use apple cider vinegar (organic, unfiltered, raw) for low stomach acid, rather than Betaine HCl? Obviously it's a lot cheaper than the pills, and as long as it's well diluted, I don't see a downside.

    Unless, or course, it doesn't work!

    According to my searches, the 'formula' is 1 teaspoon in a glass of water immediately before eating. One site said to sip vinegar water throughout the day, but I don't see the benefit in that.

    Ideas?
  2. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    It didn't work for me. Tried different methods and vinegar. The vinegar never has the same good effects on stomach function that the Betaine HCL has.
  3. lnester7

    lnester7 Seven

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    Can one have low acid and still have Acid reflux???
  4. Ocean

    Ocean Senior Member

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    They say that yes you can.

    As for people like me with a hiatal hernia I've heard both that it's good to take betaine and that you shouldn't take it if you have a hiatal hernia. Anyone know or have personal experience with that?
  5. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    Yes, although it's probably not acid reflux, it's just reflux. In both cases, your esophagus still gets damaged. Increasing acid levels will probably encourage the sphincter to do its job better. However, make sure you don't have gastritis or are infected with Helicobacter pylori. Otherwise, if you increase acid in these cases, you may be setting yourself up for ulceration.
  6. SJB944

    SJB944 Senior Member

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    I'm finding lemon juice to be useful. Have used betaine HCI but am concerned about TMG.

    Vineger is not so good if you have yeast issues, or fermenting gut or so I've found.

    Sent from my GT-P1000T using Tapatalk 2
  7. Patrick*

    Patrick* Formerly PWCalvin

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    I was going to say the same thing. We have to distinguish regular vinegar from apple cider vinegar--they are totally different things. Apple cider is supposedly very effective at combating yeast/candida, and is often prescribed as a treatment, while regular vinegar actually feeds the yeast.
  8. hixxy

    hixxy Woof woof

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    I found Braggs ACV quite effective, but it just plain burnt my mouth and esophagus too much on the way down.
  9. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    You can buy liquid, dilute HCL from Allergy Research--no Betaine. Here is a link though there are probably cheaper places to order it: http://www.wildearthmarket.com/nutr...ormulas/hydrochloric-acid-1-500-arg75720.html

    Sushi
  10. madietodd

    madietodd Senior Member

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    Yes, my vinegar is Braggs; I actually like the taste, when I dilute it enough. With honey, it's a folk remedy for colds and cough.

    I have no way of knowing if any of this is working, except that I'm burping a bit, for the first time I can remember. When I tried the baking soda burp test, I never burped at all.
  11. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, all.

    The pH of acetic acid solutions, as in vinegar, is not quite as acidic as that of citric acid solutions, as found in lemon juice, so I don't think it would be as effective, but would still be in the right pH range.

    The stomach pH can get down to pH1 and or less, but usually runs between pH 1 and 3. Pepsin, the enzyme that breaks down protein in the stomach, operates best between pH 1.8 and 3.5, and it is inactivated above pH 3.5. Lemon juice has a pH of about 2.2, and vinegar has a pH of about 2.4.

    Best regards,

    Rich
  12. madietodd

    madietodd Senior Member

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    Do any of you remember those awful chemistry questions, with two containers of solutions? "In container A we have a 10% solution, and in container B we have a 35% solution. How much from container B must be added to A to make a 55% solution?"

    So that's where I went with this great information about stomach acid. What difference could it possibly make to add a teaspoon of lemon juice or vinegar to the entire contents of my stomach? Especially given that I'm immediately pouring in food and liquid?
  13. richvank

    richvank Senior Member

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    Hi, Madie.

    There is an additional thing that goes on with these so-called "weak acids." As they are diluted, they ionize more and thus produce additional hydrogen ions, so that it isn't a simple mixture problem. Here's a discussion of that: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid_strength

    Best regards,

    Rich
  14. madietodd

    madietodd Senior Member

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    I am going to pretend that I understood that article, and have already put it to good use solving my low stomach acid.
    Athene likes this.
  15. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    Well, it basically means that hydrochloric acid is the real thing and that everything else is for sissies! :)

    Seriously, whatever the delivery vehicle, HCl is powerful stuff and should not be taken if people don't know whether they have gastritis or are infected with H. pylori.
  16. kiti

    kiti

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    Thanks for sharing the info. Very Useful. Now I'm interested in the properties of vinegar.
  17. Foggy

    Foggy

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    I have a sliding hiatus hernia and acid reflux and its terrible! And taking vinegar is sheer hell. Having surgery next month to get it fixed and hopefully come off my very powerful PPI's.

    Count yourself lucky that you have low acid levels.

    PS. If you're worried and your dr recommends you have 24hr pH monitoring of your stomach/oesaphagus - DON'T HAVE IT! Trust me - its inhumane and bloody awful.
  18. madietodd

    madietodd Senior Member

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    Thanks for the warning, foggy!

    I hope your surgery goes well.
  19. Foggy

    Foggy

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    Okee kokee.
  20. CJB

    CJB Senior Member

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    I visited a naturopath last fall who prescribed about a teaspoon of Braggs organic acv before every meal. She carries a dropper bottle with her and uses it straight before meals, but said I could also dilute it in water. I sadly have only remembered to do it a couple of times, so I can't say if it helped or not, but hopefully now that I've seen this thread I'll try again. I worry about the acid on my teeth, so I would probably dilute it with water. It tasted pleasant to me.

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