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VDR and microbes, how does GcMAF affect the VDR?

Discussion in 'GcMAF' started by xrunner, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. xrunner

    xrunner Senior Member

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    Surrey
    I recently saw a presentation of Trevor Marshall where he explains his theory that a number of microbes, like EBV, CMV, TB, Borrelia etc. cause the VDR to malfunction (see link, slide minute 11 -12). This suppresses the innate immune system from working properly and ultimately causing disease.

    I know GcMAF reactivates the innate immune system. I know there's a link between GcMAF and VDR but I can't understand it. Is GcMAF another, a proven way, of reversing the effects Marshall talks about?

    I'd appreciate if anybody could explain how GcMAF affects the VDR. Tx

    http://vimeo.com/32641708
     
  2. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    I have no idea how GcMAF affects the VDR but what I can say for sure is that GcMAF has the same effect on me as vitamin D itself. It ramps up my Th2 response to everything, I get swollen eyelids and suffer from a strong increase of allergies and intolerances.
     
  3. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    Many of us on GcMAF were told to take anti-histamines. There is some connection with histamine, but I don't remember what it is. Some doctors suggest taking over the counter meds that will block at least 3 of the histamine receptors.

    Sushi
     
  4. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    That's very interesting, Sushi. The H1 receptor is no problem (normal antihistamines), H2 is also no problem (Cimetidine) but what do you take for H3 or H4?
     
  5. pilgrim

    pilgrim

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    I don't think anybody knows yet how gcmaf really works...

    This is from Prof R website:

    "We recently demonstrated that the F and b alleles
    of the polymorphic VDR gene were associated with the highest
    response (in terms of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)
    formation and proliferation) to 100pg of GcMAF per millilitre in human
    peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In subjects harbouring FF
    and bb genotypes, GcMAF maintained cell viability for about 98 hours
    after drawing whereas unstimulated cells were no longer viable after
    48 hours, as if, in those subjects, GcMAF had rescued monocytes
    from apoptosis.37 It is worth noting that the VDR alleles termed F and
    b are also associated with the highest sensitivity to vitamin D and its
    analogues; an interconnection of vitamin D and GcMAF signalling
    pathways can thus be hypothesised."


    "However, we do not know as yet
    whether GcMAF exerts its effects through direct interaction with the
    VDR or whether VDR polymorphisms influence the response to
    GcMAF in an indirect manner.
    As a matter of fact, VDR polymorphisms
    indirectly influence a variety of conditions, from cancer38 to acquired
    immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)39 and CKD.15 Further studies will
    elucidate whether VDR polymorphisms are also associated with the
    known polymorphisms of VDBP, the precursor of GcMAF,40 or with
    polymorphisms of the gene coding for the GcMAF receptor."
     
  6. khiquita

    khiquita

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    GcMAF VitD

    "VDR genetics do not seem to play a role in predicting response as earlier thought according to one practitioner that I have spoken with. That said, Vitamin D levels do correlate with the positive response rate of GcMAF. Thus, Vitamin D supplementation may be required in order to optimize outcome." Better Health Guy Scott http://www.betterhealthguy.com/joomla/blog/247
     

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