1. Patients launch a $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
No Longer Naive in the Ways of The Beast
After having lived for years with ME/CFS, Jody Smith learned there's more to this beast of an illness than she realized, and that what might help one person may not help others ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Vagus Nerve Stimulator

Discussion in 'Autonomic, Cardiovascular, and Respiratory' started by Emootje, Dec 26, 2013.

  1. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes:
    94
    The Netherlands
    I am having hues improvement by stimulating my vagus nerve by breathing slow and deep.
    Now I want more stimulation. Do you think this thing could be helpful?

  2. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

    Messages:
    816
    Likes:
    726
    I have an implanted vagus nerve stimulator (VNS by Cyberonics), which is normally used in cases of partial-onset epilepsy. In my case it was considered a possible alternative for "treatment-resistant depression". I believe it only benefits those patients with dysautonomia, which is why there are equivocal results from studies concentrating on "depression". There have been a number of times when I had unexplained (vasovagal?) syncope (fainting).

    It appears to shift the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which helps to compensate for an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This does not correct damage to the autonomic nervous system but may reduce symptoms which interfere with normal health. (If it makes a difference in your ability to sleep it can be life-saving.) Research indicates VNS reduces production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which fits in with a number of models of ME/CFS as a neuroinflammatory disorder. The cause of the inflammation remains elusive.
    WoolPippi and Emootje like this.
  3. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

    Messages:
    6,135
    Likes:
    4,721
    Albuquerque
    @Emootje

    I have been interested in this technology too as my autonomic doctor mentioned it. I think it is something to research very carefully as all outcomes are not good. I know one person who had more difficulties after having this put in.

    Best wishes on this and keep us posted.

    Sushi
    Emootje likes this.
  4. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes:
    94
    The Netherlands
    Thanks anciendaze, very interesting. Just wondering, do you consider yourself a patient with an overactive sympathetic nervous system (high heart rate, cold hands, excessive sweating, pale)?...and did your mood change after the vagus nerve stimulator?
  5. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

    Messages:
    816
    Likes:
    726
    Yes, I do think my sympathetic nervous system is overactive, likely because of diffuse damage. My heart rate goes up when I am upright, though this may not qualify as POTS. (If I make it to a doctor's office my heart rate will be well above basal rate.) If I stay upright too long my hands turn cold and pale. I also have brain fog under these conditions. If it is hot I tend to sweat, though not excessively by comparison with others. The difference is in the effect -- I am very sensitive to dehydration or loss of salt. This points to hypovolemia and your findings about ANP. I also have a problem with urinary frequency, which could be a disturbance in secretion of vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone). Most of these things do not interest endocrinologists because they stop short of the official thresholds for endocrine disorders. Likewise, dysautonomia, tinnitus and a mild case of "burning feet" do not interest neurologists.

    My doctor says my mood improved. I think the difference came from fewer episodes like those described above, plus better sleep.

    I strongly suspect I fit in the subgroup with diastolic dysfunction and reduced cardiac output. I have not pursued this because of concern for what cardiologists who don't recognize this syndrome are likely to do about it. I've seen patients medicated to reduce heart rate who then became bed-bound.
    Sidereal and Emootje like this.
  6. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes:
    94
    The Netherlands
    Apparently VNS not the answer for everybody. Thanks again, anciendaze.
  7. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes:
    94
    The Netherlands
    Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation reduces serum high mobility group box 1 levels and improves survival in murine sepsis

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE:
    Electrical vagus nerve stimulation inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and prevents shock during lethal systemic inflammation through an alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR)-dependent pathway to the spleen, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Pharmacologic alpha7nAChR agonists inhibit production of the critical proinflammatory mediator high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and rescue mice from lethal polymicrobial sepsis. Here we developed a method of transcutaneous mechanical vagus nerve stimulation and then investigated whether this therapy can protect mice against sepsis lethality.

    DESIGN:
    Prospective, randomized study.

    SETTING:
    Institute-based research laboratory.

    SUBJECTS:
    Male BALB/c mice.

    INTERVENTIONS:
    Mice received lipopolysaccharide to induce lethal endotoxemia or underwent cecal ligation and puncture to induce polymicrobial sepsis. Mice were then randomized to receive electrical, transcutaneous, or sham vagus nerve stimulation and were followed for survival or euthanized at predetermined time points for cytokine analysis.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:
    Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation dose-dependently reduced systemic tumor necrosis factor levels during lethal endotoxemia. Treatment with transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation inhibited HMGB1 levels and improved survival in mice with polymicrobial sepsis, even when administered 24 hrs after the onset of disease.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation is an efficacious treatment for mice with lethal endotoxemia or polymicrobial sepsis.
  8. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

    Messages:
    931
    Likes:
    389
    If you can put the device of when it becomes to much it would be less risky.

    Wonder it will get deep enough to stimulate the nervus vagus in humans.
    Emootje likes this.
  9. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes:
    94
    The Netherlands
  10. MARGARITA COLOMBO

    MARGARITA COLOMBO TAOWAY

    Messages:
    25
    Likes:
    9
    Now I want more stimulation. Do you think this thing could be helpful?

    Sudarshan Kriya breathing system does that, The Art Of Living Foundation teaches it worldwide, surely you can find a representative close to you. You can also check out the Vanaglore University search related to vagus nerve and breathing-sudarshan. I am sorry if my spelling is not good.
    Emootje likes this.
  11. Emootje

    Emootje Senior Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes:
    94
    The Netherlands
    Thanks Margarita, I tried the Sudarshar Kriya breathing a couple of times and I always get myalgia after pumping my belly. Maybe I need to practice more....
  12. MARGARITA COLOMBO

    MARGARITA COLOMBO TAOWAY

    Messages:
    25
    Likes:
    9
    I think it is good that you have noticed your personal reactions, maybe it is much stimulation for you abdominal área, but anyway you can allways talk with your instructor, they usually have a lot of experience with many people and can give you some advice.
    Good luck!

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page