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US funding for ME/CFS research moved from MOSS to IFCN (doesn't seem good to me)

Discussion in 'Action Alerts and Advocacy' started by shrewsbury, Mar 3, 2010.

  1. shrewsbury

    shrewsbury member

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    Jill McLaughlin posted this to co-cure Feb 22 '10

    [if: This doesn't look good to me. It seems the focus of researchfunded is changing away from focus on the disease or disease process. I don't remember this being an issue at the CFSAC. Seems it should be! Also, further down it says only 15% of the peer-reviewers have published in the field.]

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    IFCN - Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience Scientific Areas of Integrated Review Groups (IRGs)

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    http://cms.csr.nih.gov/PeerReviewMeetings/CSRIRGDescriptionNew/IFCNIRG/

    Home > Peer Review Meetings > Review Group Descriptions > IFCN - Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience
    Scientific Areas of Integrated Review Groups (IRGs)

    For a listing of the Scientific Review Officer and membership roster for each study section, click on the study section roster under the study section name within an IRG listed below or go to the study section index (study sections listed alphabetically) and click on the specified roster next to the name of the study section.

    Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience IRG [IFCN]
    Last updated on 24th November, 2008

    The ten study sections comprising the Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience [IFCN] IRG review applications within a very wide range of neuroscience research aimed at furthering our understanding of how the nervous system is organized and functions at an integrative, systems level. Specific areas reviewed by the IFCN IRG include: studies of the neural basis of emotional and motivational behavior; regulation of function, at the systems level, by neuroendocrine and neuroimmune influences; the analysis of system function under varying behavioral states, such as sleep and hibernation; the basis of biological rhythms; the maintenance of homeostasis; chemosensation, hearing, balance, touch, somatosensation, and visual perception; motor systems and sensorimotor integration; the integration of multisensory information; the neurobiological basis of learning, memory and other cognitive processes; computational and theoretical models of cognitive processes; mechanisms underlying neural coding of complex stimuli (e.g., pattern recognition, spatial transformations, speech perception); and attention and its effects on information processing in the nervous system. Research proposed in applications reviewed by study sections in the IFCN IRG may have relevance to disorders or disease processes, but the emphasis would be on the effect of the process on the structure or function of the system under investigation, rather than on the disease process itself.

    In addition to this IRG, the Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Neuroscience [MDCN] and Brain Disorders and Clinical Neuroscience [BDCN] IRGs within CSR focus on the review of neuroscience-related applications, and the Biobehavioral and Behavioral Processes [BBBP] IRG also has some shared interests with the IFCN IRG. Please see the descriptions and shared interest statements of these IRGs for a complete description of their review venues.

    The following study sections are included in the IFCN IRG:

    Auditory System Study Section [AUD]
    Biological Rhythms and Sleep Study Section [BRS]
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Fibromyalgia Syndrome Special Emphasis Panel [CFS SEP]
    Cognitive Neuroscience Study Section [COG]
    Central Visual Processing Study Section [CVP]
    Neurobiology of Learning and Memory Study Section [LAM]
    Neurotoxicology and Alcohol Study Section [NAL]
    Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior Study Section [NMB]
    Neuroendocrinology, Neuroimmunology and Behavior Study Section [NNB]
    Somatosensory and Chemosensory Systems Study Section [SCS]
    Sensorimotor Integration Study Section [SMI]


    For the neurosciences, the fellowship [F01, F02A, F02B, F03A, and F03B] and small business (SBIR/STTR) [Clinical Neurophysiology, Devices, Auditory Devices and Neuroprosthesis, Pharmacology and Diagnostics for Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Neural Systems, Visual Systems, and Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience] study sections have been co-localized in the Emerging Technologies and Training in Neurosciences IRG (ETTN) effective April 2008.

    Home | Contact CSR | Staff Directory | Site Map | FOIA | Disclaimer & Privacy Statements | Accessibility Statement
    Last updated: March 21, 2009
    _______________________________________________________________________________
    http://cms.csr.nih.gov/PeerReviewMeetings/CSRIRGDescriptionNew/IFCNIRG/CFSSEP.htm

    Home > Peer Review Meetings > Review Group Descriptions > IFCN - Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Fibromyalgia Syndrome Special Emphasis Panel [CFS SEP]

    [CFS Roster]

    The Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Fibromyalgia Syndrome [CFS SEP] continuing Special Emphasis Panel [SEP] reviews applications in the multiple disciplines applied to studies of the causes, manifestations and treatments of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, the Fibromyalgia Syndrome and other chronic polysystemic morbidity syndromes.

    Specific areas covered by CFS:

    Etiopathogenesis and diagnosis

    Ameliorative and therapeutic interventions

    Health Services

    Disciplines involved/evaluated, include aspects of Allergology, Alternative Medicine, Behavioral Sciences, Chiropractic Medicine, Diagnostic Laboratory Sciences, Epidemiology, Homeopathic Medicine, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine, Medicinal Chemistry, Microbiology, Neurology, Occupational Therapy, Osteopathic Medicine, Pharmacology, Physical Therapy, Psychiatry, Psychology, Psychopharmacology, Rheumatology, and Virology

    CFS has the following shared interests outside the IFCN IRG:

    Since the etiology of CFS, FMS and the related conditions remains undefined, the applications reviewed by this group range over the wide array of disciplines listed above, and individually are frequently multidisciplinary. Since there is the potential for overlap with many other study sections, the principal determining factor for referral to this panel should be the major emphasis of the application being on the study of one of the chronic polysystemic morbidity syndromes identified in this group.


    IFCN - Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience
    Auditory System Study Section [AUD]

    Biological Rhythms and Sleep Study Section [BRS]

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Fibromyalgia Syndrome Special Emphasis Panel [CFS SEP]

    Cognitive Neuroscience Study Section [COG]

    Central Visual Processing Study Section [CVP]

    Neurobiology of Learning and Memory Study Section [LAM]

    Neurotoxicology and Alcohol Study Section [NAL]

    Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior Study Section [NMB]

    Neuroendocrinology, Neuroimmunology and Behavior Study Section [NNB]

    Somatosensory and Chemosensory Systems Study Section [SCS]

    Sensorimotor Integration Study Section [SMI]

    Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience IRG [IFCN]

    Home | Contact CSR | Staff Directory | Site Map | FOIA | Disclaimer & Privacy Statements | Accessibility Statement
    Last updated: March 21, 2009
  2. Hope123

    Hope123 Senior Member

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    Island Finn, I do not know the ins and outs of NIH funding -- it is a complex topic but from what I have gathered, it's an issue not just for CFS but for many other conditions. A lot of grant announcements are very general and not aimed at a particular condition as NIH funds a lot of basic science work. They want work that will effect more than the immediate area of the condition. It's frustrating to researchers at times but part of the art of obtaining grants is knowing how to find and fit your work into a specific call for proposal. The problem with CFS is that we are under the Women's Health office which can be concerning because it's such a broad area. Other topics, like how heart disease affects women, are also placed under Women's Health but the difference is that it also fits under the National Heart Lung Blood Institute.

    For those interested, this e-book is available free (actual book you need to pay):

    http://www.iom.edu/Reports/1998/Sci...Priority-Setting-and-Public-Input-at-NIH.aspx
  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    This is what I sent Jill at the time for what it's worth (too tired, etc to re-phrase)

    Hi Jill,

    This is interesting.

    In the UK, the MRC came up with a research strategy in 2003 which said studying the aetiology and pathophysiology wasn't necessary.
    This was based on the idea that rehabilitation therapies of one sort or another could be the answer without knowing the cause of the problem.

    This is what the CBT School of Thought (aka Wessely/Sharpe/White/Chalder School of Thought) like.

    Bye,

    Tom
  4. justinreilly

    justinreilly Stop the IoM & P2P! Adopt CCC!

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    NYC (& RI)
    The specific sub-group it's in, CFS SEP (special emphasis panel) seems fine. It says they are going to look at it from a multi-organ systems viewpoint, which is good. There are a range of specialties involved which is nice, but they include psychiatry, psychology and psychopharmachology but not endocrinology.
    It does say they will look at the "etiopathogenesis and diagnosis" as well as treatments and health services so this seems fine. I hope it's just an oversight that it said they won't accept grant proposals regarding actual diseases or disease processes. The word 'functional' in the group title makes me uneasy since 'CFS' gets thrown into 'functional somatic syndromes' by many doctors which is the 'general medicine' analog to psychiatry's 'somatization.' I couldn't find a definition of functional neuroscience. Wikipedia referred a link from "functional neuroscience' to 'neurophysiology' so that seems like basically a systems approach to neurology which is good.
  5. justinreilly

    justinreilly Stop the IoM & P2P! Adopt CCC!

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    NYC (& RI)
    I sent an email to grantsinfo@nih.gov:

    "I have ME/CFIDS. I noticed that recently the CFS SEP (special emphasis panel) got put in the Integrative, Functional, and Cognitive Neuroscience IRG [IFCN].

    Your website says:

    "Research proposed in applications reviewed by study sections in the IFCN IRG may have relevance to disorders or disease processes, but the emphasis would be on the effect of the process on the structure or function of the system under investigation, rather than on the disease process itself."

    http://cms.csr.nih.gov/PeerReviewMeetings/CSRIRGDescriptionNew/IFCNIRG/

    I hope this is not true for the "CFS SEP" as this would be unacceptable. Research into the disease and disease process is desperately needed.

    Please confirm that this is not the case and change the website. Or put me in contact with an admistrator with whom I can discuss this matter. Thanks for your time.

    Sincerely,
    Justin Reilly, esq."
  6. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Functional is a word similar to "Medically Unexplained"

    (Sample reference)

    from:
    Free full text: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/325/7378/1449
    What should we say to patients with symptoms unexplained by disease? The "number needed to offend".

    Stone J, Wojcik W, Durrance D, Carson A, Lewis S, MacKenzie L, Warlow CP, Sharpe M.

    BMJ. 2002 Dec 21;325(7378):1449-50.

    University Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU. jstone@skull.dcn.ed.ac.uk

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    Some of these authors are very "hardline" psychobabblers. For example, they like the concept hysteria. And when somebody (Slater?) criticised an example of hysteria (person turned out to have vCJD - human "mad cow disease" - they said the person could have vCJD and hysteria!

    Anyway just warning people.
    In the UK anyway, there are a lot of neurologists who are quite "intolerant" of some patients who attend their clinics and like to engage in psychobabble regarding such patients.
  7. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    There has been a CFS SEP for many years.
  8. shrewsbury

    shrewsbury member

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    yay Justin! Very well done.

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