A Little Poisoning Along the Road to ME/CFS
Looking at my symptoms, many of which are far less these days and some are gone, it would be easy to figure that I'd just been dealing with some heavy-duty menopausal issues.
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tuberculosis

Discussion in 'Active Clinical Studies' started by peteroostende, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. peteroostende

    peteroostende

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    Belgium , Ostend
    hello,

    I am new on the forum.

    I have a question of the relation between cfs/me and tuberculosis.:eek:

    I have been working since 1991 in the prison-services as prison-wardener. In 2000 I've diagnosed with tuberculosis following a test .
    The test was done after an female prisoner died of an 'open'-tb. Some male prisoner were diagnosed with open-tb.
    Due to this outbreak the prison-services ordered that all the people in that prison should be tested. Following this test I was diagnosed with TB . I had to take during nine months an antibiotic.
    It was also decided after that the tb was workrelated.

    Is it possible that cfs/me is "activated" by tb.:confused:

    sorry for my english.:ashamed:
     
  2. Athene

    Athene ihateticks.me

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    Italy
    Welcome to the forum, Peter.

    I am sorry to hear this. What a terrible experience!

    A lot of us have had their CFS activated by some other severe infection, so I don't see why TB would not be one of the triggers. I would think that TB could leave very bad damage to the body. Have you had any tests to see what type of long terms effects it has had on you? That might be useful as a starting point to work out the best way forward.
     
  3. susileela

    susileela

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    TB is a lung infection caused by bacteria (Mycobacterim tuberculosis). It can affect other parts of the body, but usually results in a chronic cough that can be associated with bloody sputum. About one-third of the world's population has been infected with TB, although most are not active forms of the disease. If left untreated, an active form of the disease can lead to death. It is mostly spread to others by respiratory droplets.
     
  4. samuelson90

    samuelson90

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    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria whose scientific name is Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It was first isolated in 1882 by a German physician named Robert Koch who received the Nobel Prize for this discovery. TB most commonly affects the lungs but also can involve almost any organ of the body. Many years ago, this disease was referred to as "consumption" because without effective treatment, these patients often would waste away. Today, of course, tuberculosis usually can be treated successfully with antibiotics.

    There is also a group of organisms referred to as atypical tuberculosis. These involve other types of bacteria that are in the Mycobacterium family. Often, these organisms do not cause disease and are referred to as "colonizers" because they simply live alongside other bacteria in our bodies without causing damage. At times, these bacteria can cause an infection that is sometimes clinically like typical tuberculosis. When these atypical mycobacteria cause infection, they are often very difficult to cure. Often, drug therapy for these organisms must be administered for one and a half to two years and requires multiple medications.


    How does a person get TB?

    A person can become infected with tuberculosis bacteria when he or she inhales minute particles of infected sputum from the air. The bacteria get into the air when someone who has a tuberculosis lung infection coughs, sneezes, shouts, or spits (which is common in some cultures). People who are nearby can then possibly breathe the bacteria into their lungs. You don't get TB by just touching the clothes or shaking the hands of someone who is infected. Tuberculosis is spread (transmitted) primarily from person to person by breathing infected air during close contact.

    There is a form of atypical tuberculosis, however, that is transmitted by drinking unpasteurized milk. Related bacteria, called Mycobacterium bovis, cause this form of TB. Previously, this type of bacteria was a major cause of TB in children, but it rarely causes TB now since most milk is pasteurized (undergoes a heating process that kills the bacteria).
    samuelson90
     
  5. madijen

    madijen

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    Several years ago I was dx with Mycobacterium Avium Intracelluare and Mycbacterium Fortuitum and was on 3 antibiotics for 22 months. This effected my lungs. I was off the antibiotics for a year and then back on them for 12 months. I have been off the antibiotics for a year but know that it's still there as my coughing has worsened and at some point will go back to the infectious disease dr. These mycobacterium are found in the air, water, and soil but are not contagious. They can do extensive damage to the lungs where people have had parts of a lung removed. Some have died. I've had CFS for over 2O years which probably attributed to my getting this.
     
  6. chitra

    chitra

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    May want to check Colorado and New York history .Two of the biggest history spots .Took my uncle after the second W.W. But the best history will be Colorado 1860s through 1950s.Colo Spgs. I lived in a house that use to be a T.B. hospital.
    .......................................................
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