Agents for Change: The 10th Invest in ME International ME Conference, 2015 - Part 1
The 10th Invest in ME International ME Conference (IIMEC10) was held, as usual, in the Lecture Theatre at 1 Birdcage Walk in Westminster on May 29th, 2015.
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tremor worse when standing

Discussion in 'Problems Standing: Orthostatic Intolerance; POTS' started by Shell, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. Shell

    Shell Senior Member

    I'm awaiting tests for hyper POTs. It's a looong process. I have a tremor that's there most of the time (although I do have days or hours when it isn't there).
    I've noticed that the tremor is far worse when I've been standing for any length of time. It means I drop stuff more often (but that could be the peripheral neuropathy - the ends of my fingers are dead).
    Is this a dopermine thing?
    Anyone else get this?
  2. Tito

    Tito Senior Member

    I get that too. I always assumed it was due to lower blood pressure whilst standing up, but I could be wrong as I have neurological problems too.
  3. maryb

    maryb iherb code TAK122

    I get the tremor in my legs - my GP said it was anxiety:rolleyes: and offered me a/depressants - I ran and rarely go back.
    Hope you get sorted soon with your test.
    taniaaust1 and Valentijn like this.
  4. peggy-sue


    Standing isn't an easy thing for your body to do. It's complicated and a lot of muscle work

    It takes about 360 different muscles working against each other to achieve it - and you have to take balancing into account too.

    When you're standing still, your leg muscles aren't creating the "muscular pump" which comes from the muscles squeezing the veins and getting the blood back up (against gravity) from your feet - which is the furthest it gets away from your heart and so your heart has to work really hard to push the blood back up without this big extra help.

    Do not try to stand still - shuffle about a bit. This gets the muscular pump working and you don't have to struggle nearly so much with balance, because you're shifting your centre of gravity around the whole time.
    taniaaust1, Valentijn and merylg like this.
  5. Shell

    Shell Senior Member

    Thanks folks. Tito - my BP belts upwards when I'm upright, but can drop out suddenly so it could be BP.
    maryb Ye gods and little fishes! What is with medics and their default "It's anxiety, here's some antidepressents" position?!
    peggy-sue I guess it is the OI thing. My oldest daughter complains that I rock when I'm standing and as I am gravitationally challenged she thinks I'm about to keel over - but maybe it's my body trying to find it's centre of gravity.

    The reason I wondered if it was a dopermine issue is based on Patrick Wood's research that shows patients with a dx of fibromyalgia (which I had along with ME ) had low dopermine. It would make it a sort of psuedo-Parkinson's tremor. It's also worse when I'm sat very upright for any length of time.- usually in the wheelchair.
    The twitching and jerking gets worse then too.

    Oh well...KBO
  6. Ruthie24

    Ruthie24 Senior Member

    New Mexico, USA
    @shell- I get this tremor, especially worse when standing, too. A low dose beta blocker has been very helpful for me personally. Tried weaning off it recently to see if it would help my fatigue. Stayed off for awhile but the tremor was SOOO much worse, as were many other symptoms, so am gladly back on it again.

    I was almost wondering if, when I was off the beta blocker, I was dumping a lot more norepi because my BP's were quite a bit higher when standing, although pulse pressures were very narrow, HRs were much higher, along with the jittery, dropping everything tremors.

    Good question about the dopamine though too. My OI symptoms are also helped a lot by low dose bupropion which is a dopamimine/norepi med.
  7. taniaaust1


    Sth Australia
    Tremors from standing could be due to the OI or just due to the ME exertion of just standing seeing your ME is quite bad. I can get tremors from standing..but nowdays I just seem to mostly just go down without much warning.

    Its common for us to subconsciously be rocking.. which helps us keep blood to our head.

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