A New Decade of ME Research: The 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry presents the first in a series of articles on the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London ...
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Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by hixxy, Dec 6, 2017 at 3:05 PM.

  1. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    Australia
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29202780
    https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-017-1350-1
     
  2. Gijs

    Gijs Senior Member

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    So Montoya is wrong (?). TGF b must be replicated in adults too, but i think TGF B and cytokines are not usefull for markers in ME patiënts at all!
     
  3. Londinium

    Londinium Senior Member

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    Given the selection criteria, I'm not sure there's much we can conclude from this study at all.
     
  4. Murph

    Murph :)

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    I thought that when I started reading it, but they subgrouped for Canadian criteria and still came up empty.

    >Subgrouping according to the Fukuda and Canada 2003 criteria of CFS did not reveal differential results.
     
  5. Philipp

    Philipp

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    Are plasma levels the most relevant thing to look at here? I vaguely remember Prof Edwards commenting that tgf-b is used to somehow mark cells for a longer period of time (if I understood correctly), so depending on how this stuff works (I have no clue obviously), maybe there are bouts of transiently high levels followed by a regression to the mean which would be difficult to capture unless it is known when to look as well as where? Or the plasma tgf-b is used up at roughly the same speed as it is produced so levels stay constant, but turnover may be higher if more cells are 'painted' with it?

    It is interesting anyway that cortisol & (nor-)epinephrine are mentioned in this context since those do come up time and again.
     

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